Tom House's books: Picture Perfect Pitcher & Pitching Ed


#1

Hey guys, right now I’m reading The Louisville Slugger Complete Book of Pitching, from Doug Myers and Mark Gola. I’m liking it. Although I would like a little bit more of pictures on it.

It covers all the mechanics phases, and has one chapter for each type of pitch, fastball, change up, breaking balls (curve, slider, splitter…). Also it has some drills and workouts for pitchers and it has something on the mental part of pitching.

What do you guys think of it?

Also, I’m thinking of purchasing one of these 2 pitching books from Tom House:

The Pitching Edge (which I have a VHS of it, so I don’t know if purchasing the book would be the best deal) or The Picture Perfect Pitcher (which I read some reviews saying that it is great in pitching mechanics).
I’m thinking of buying the second one, since my main concern right now is mechanics, and I would like a book with lots of information about the mechanics.

Anyone here read any of these 2 above? If so, tell me what should I buy.
Thanks.


#2

I have both of these books and really wasn’t that impressed by either one.


#3

I’ll counter balance Chris on this one, though his opinion is his own and worthy.
Our pitching/hitting coach uses the Pitching Edge as a learning tool, for illustrations.
He is kind of of the same mind as me, which is that books only go so far in the learning process and as a tool are useful but can muddle you into thoretical convolutions which can get you away from the point at hand…getting better. Sorta the perpetual discussion of “Guruisms” which we have throughout this site, they are fun but when the rubber hits the road sort of a distraction. My Marshall beat you Mills but trumps your House nyahnyah. :lol:


#4

I found the books to be too theoretical and not practical (and when they were practical, I disagreed with the practice). I felt like the good, practical stuff was being saved for the videos and what was in the books was generally theoretical mumbo-jumbo. For example, postural stabilization is an interesting idea but how do you improve it? Also, the towel drill is a practical tool, but I disagree with the logic behind it.


#5

Chris…bless you, you make my point too clear.
You have good points for your argument, and I also cast a pox on mumbojumbo…
Helping those who want to perform at a higher level doing this strange thing of chunking a hunk-o-horsehide off a hill is a laudable goal for all who attempt it.
Ain’t it great to have a place to air the opinions and different perspectives?

I still say, “Learn the enemy”, I’ve personally have learned more by listening to Ted Williams tell folks how to hit, then a stack of How to pitch books…so there you have my opine.


#6

Just wondering…what is the logic behind the towel drill that you disagree with and why?


#7

Just wondering…what is the logic behind the towel drill that you disagree with and why?[/quote]

My concern is that, in an effort to release the ball as close to the plate as possible (to create apparent velocity), you might…

  1. Lower the release point.
  2. Interfere with the body’s ability to efficiently generate force (it’s easier to rotate the torso when the torso is upright than when it is tilted forward).

Mark Prior is a big believer in the towel drill and also has had a series of injury problems.

My concern is that the two could be related.


#8

I would not recommend either of the Tom House books you mentioned as they are no longer the most up to date. Instead, I’d recommend “The Art and Science of Pitching”. This is the latest book from House and is the most up to date. House is constantly updating his information so you want his latest book.


#9

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”][quote=“Lefty”]
Just wondering…what is the logic behind the towel drill that you disagree with and why?[/quote]
My concern is that, in an effort to release the ball as close to the plate as possible (to create apparent velocity), you might…

  1. Lower the release point.
  2. Interfere with the body’s ability to efficiently generate force (it’s easier to rotate the torso when the torso is upright than when it is tilted forward).[/quote]

Chris, how can you be against tilting the torso forward yet say it’s ok to tilt the shoulders to the side (which most likely tilts the torso to the side) in order to have a high release point? I agree with your statement that force (on the ball) is maximumally generated when the shoulders rotate around an upright spine. But your past arguments about it being ok to tilt the shoulders to the side contradicts your comment about not tilting the torso forward.

Regardless, the notion of getting the release point closer to home plate does not imply tilting the torso forward. In fact, Tom House preaches the contrary. Specifically, he preaches dragging the back foot until after the ball is released as that helps keep the torso upright.

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]Mark Prior is a big believer in the towel drill and also has had a series of injury problems.

My concern is that the two could be related.[/quote]

For others reading this thread, there is no established cause and effect there. I was informed that Prior’s injuries stem from some overuse due to a previous coach of his. The whole idea behind using a towel is that the towel is much lighter than a baseball and puts far less stress on the body.