Toe Drag

Can someone explain to me a few things about the back foot toe drag?

  1. What are the benefits to the toe drag?
  2. What is bad about not having a toe drag?
  3. How to correct your mechanics to have a toe drag?

I would like to know because this is the one thing that i dont like about my mechanics and have heard that it is a bad thing to have your back foot “pop” up like mine does. Thanks

vid for example :

[quote=“LincySchmidt17”]Can someone explain to me a few things about the back foot toe drag?

  1. What are the benefits to the toe drag?[/quote]
    Toe drag is simply a result of keeping the head and shoulders stacked upright into release. I wouldn’t say there is a benefit to the toe drag itself. But I would say there is benefit to keeping the head and shoulders stacked upright. It means you have stayed inline with the target and have stayed closed to rotate late.

Lifting the back foot can be an indicator that you have a posture that puts your upper half out front too early and/or too far. Or it could be an indicator of a timing problem such as opening up early. These types of issues cause the back foot to lift off the ground. But I wouldn’t go so far as to say it always indicates a problem. Curt Schilling is one whose back foot lifts before ball release. On the other hand, he’s had injuries in recent years so maybe it finally caught up with him. Maybe. I don’t really know the causes of Schillings injuries.

[quote]3. How to correct your mechanics to have a toe drag?

I would like to know because this is the one thing that i dont like about my mechanics and have heard that it is a bad thing to have your back foot “pop” up like mine does. Thanks[/quote]
In general, fix the issues I mentioned above to restore a toe drag. In your case, I think you have a postural change that pulls your back foot off the ground. Specifically, as your shoulders rotate, you tilt your spine to the glove side in what I call a cartwheeling motion. I believe this pulls your back foot off the ground. It also initiates shoulder rotation a bit sooner than it otherwise could be. Eliminate the tilt and rotate your shoulders around an upright spine and you should get the toe drag back. But, more importantly, you’ll be able to delay shoulder rotation which should let you pick up another MPH or two as well as moving your release point closer to home plate (since your body continues to track forward while you’re delaying shoulder rotation).

Your toe does drag I really don’t see any problem with it at all. You are going to have to bring your foot up so you can get into proper fielding position.

I agree with Roger’s assessment.

Some things I would like to add, though. You look fine on the first pitch. Every pitch after, your falling toward the plate. It seems it’s because you are straightening your front leg too much. This is causing you to “pole vault”. You probably aren’t using your glutes, hamstrings, and hip muscles enough in the front leg to decelerate and stop your forward momentum into release. Think about doing a lunge into your front leg.

Hey XV dont u wanna keep ur momentum go through the plate? Or in a more controlled manner?

[quote=“McCovey Cove”]Hey XV dont u wanna keep ur momentum go through the plate?[/quote]No. You want to transfer that momentum up the body to the arm and ball.

How do u do that?

I’m referring to the momentum once the front leg has established a base with which to throw on.

Gotcha man. THanks for the better understanding and the nice visual

When the front foot plants and the front leg braces, it stops the forward motion of the front hip. This causes the back hip to rotate around the front hip and it causes linear momentum down the hill to be converted into rotational momentum. All motion is not stopped (obviously).

I get what ur saying thanks rog

Alright, thanks guys. I think i get it now. I’ll try working on this thru tryouts and the offseason

I really like your mechanics… If you dont mind me asking, how hard do you throw?

thanks! I havent been clocked in awhile but I think I’m up in the 75-80mph range.