Tired arm?

I’m new to this forum, glad I found it.
My 12 yr old just finished summer league middle of July.
I let him take a break for a few weeks, but now we are in fall ball, first game was last Monday.
During the game and then at practice the following wed. I noticed he has lost his velocity. Coach thinks he has tired arm.
Coach stated that he didn’t have my son throw nearly as many innings this year as in prev. yrs.
I’m thinking we took too many weeks off inbetween summer and fall ball.
What can I do to help my son get back in midseason form? I don’t want to over exert his arm, just help him get back where he was at the end of summer ball.
Thanks.
GH

It’s entirely possible that your son may have taken too much time off. The interval between the end of summer ball and the start of fall ball was very short, and during that time he probably got a bit rusty and lost some of that edge. A week or ten days would have been sufficient, and after that time he should have resumed throwing, easy at first and then picking up speed. But no harm done; he can easily get back to where he was. He could easily take a longer break during the winter months if no baseball is played at that time, but when he gets back into it he should not make the mistake of going full tilt from the get-go. Right now, let him rest a day or two and then do a bullpen session so he can see where he’s at and what needs to be done. 8)

How many innings did he throw this summer?

Thanks for your help… He has a game tonight, I’ll ask the coach how many innings/pitches he threw this summer.
This coach is really good about not allowing the boy’s to be over worked.
He also refuses to allow the pitchers to throw the curve ball, which I agree.
He does allow the 2 seam, the 4 seam and circle change.
GH

On the other hand, how much time off has your son had in the last year? ASMI recommends youth pitchers should get 2-3 contiguous months off each year. I know that’s tough to do at the high school level where they have spring, summer and fall programs (at least, in the warm climate states). Here in the Phoenix area, I usually recommend taking that time off between summer and fall.

Dead arm is a deficit situation that is resolved by reducing the workload - not increasing it.

Just got back from the game.
Coach only pitched him one inning as he said he’d do. My son did better for sure, but still not there yet,altho he was never what I’d call a fast ball pitcher. More of a control pitcher and it seems nothing ever effects him under pressure.
I do feel a little better about things.
This summer he pitched 35 innings and threw almost 600 pitches. I have no clue what the norm would be.
In answer to how long of a break between fall and summer ball is about 2 months. Fall ends in October, and we’re back at it come jan. for practice, altho games don’t start till last of march.
Thanks for all your help, and I hope its just that I let him take too much time off between summer and fall ball.
GH

[quote=“Hoopes”]Just got back from the game.
Coach only pitched him one inning as he said he’d do. My son did better for sure, but still not there yet,altho he was never what I’d call a fast ball pitcher. More of a control pitcher and it seems nothing ever effects him under pressure.
I do feel a little better about things.
This summer he pitched 35 innings and threw almost 600 pitches. I have no clue what the norm would be.
In answer to how long of a break between fall and summer ball is about 2 months. Fall ends in October, and we’re back at it come jan. for practice, altho games don’t start till last of march.
Thanks for all your help, and I hope its just that I let him take too much time off between summer and fall ball.
GH[/quote]

I would focus more on his throwing schedule in between outings. The tiredness could simply be an issue that he is not prepared to pitch. I had a kid recently that complained of the same thing, this was an upper 80’s lefty from AL that suddenly dropped to 80-81.

He had some soreness and was told to shut it down, he had “dead arm”. He said that he began to take more time off and thought by resting the arm it would relieve the soreness. What was happening is that he was never prepared to pitch. The day he went out to pitch was the most intense day of his throwing routine. Ideally, you want the arm to “have been there before”. His wasn’t and therefore, he lacked endurance, strength and just simply wasn’t prepared to pitch.

I believe that too often we focus on pitching, every study, every question is how much is he pitching. As well we should, but too often we forget as Paul Nyman’s claims, you have to throw to pitch, you don’t have to pitch to throw.

I would encourage you and your son to sit down and begin to formulate a throwing routine. Chart your progress and allow him freedom inside the routine. I wouldn’t suggest limitations on the distance, frequency, etc… Allow him to make the decisions based on how he feels. Let him know that soreness is expected, heck its invited. However, he has to learn the difference between hurt and sore. Although, I don’t religiously follow Alan Jaegar, I do like some of his thoughts.

Soreness is part of the equation, however, in baseball there is a nasty stigma attached. Whenever your son plays other sports, I’m sure he gets sore. Spend time each day aggressively attacking the soreness through methods of controlled stress. This can include multiple tools, weighted balls, tubing, med balls, dumb bells, bats, etc… Get creative and again give him freedom.

Many major league pitching coaches—among them Johnny Sain and Leo Mazzone—advocate throwing every day. Not necessarily pitch, but just throw, which will keep the arm loose and flexible. Those guys also take a dim view of overthrowing during a game, as what often happens with pitchers who are dissatisfied with their speed and feel that they have to throw harder in order to ramp up their velocity; I for one have seen a lot of that. It’s those guys who end up with, not just a sore arm, but a dead arm, and they’re the ones who have to shut down.
Between games, I would take one day to rest, and then just play an easy game of catch, followed by a bullpen session so I could see just where my stuff was at. If I found that one of my pitches wasn’t doing what I wanted it to do, I would put it on the shelf for that game and then address that problem in a subsequent bullpen session.
And let me put in my 75 cents’ worth regarding the curve ball. True, a lot of coaches at the lower levels will not permit such shenanigans. But I found that along with my natural sidearm delivery I had a pretty nice little curve that came attached to it, and I decided that I might as well see what I could do with it. I found that I could throw it very effectively with a sharp karate-chop wrist snap, and when I picked up the knuckle-curve I also threw it that way. If a young pitcher (I was 11, 12 at the time) has it naturally, he should be allowed to use it—with discretion, of course. And the circle change is actually a difficult pitch to throw; some pitchers would do better with the backwards “c”—I was one of those.
The important thing is not to overdo it. 8)

[quote]I believe that too often we focus on pitching, every study, every question is how much is he pitching. As well we should, but too often we forget as Paul Nyman’s claims, you have to throw to pitch, you don’t have to pitch to throw.
[/quote]

IMO, this is where a good long toss program, such as Jaeger’s, comes in. Guys get the benefit of throwing the ball without pitching, airing it out. Then the pull down phase brings it all back together, throwing on a line.