TIm Lincecum

is it true that tim lincecum follows dick mills teachings
on dick mills website, he talks about how lincecum uses his style of momentum pitching

No. Mills just uses him as an example just to get your attention. Lincecum was taught everything by his father. Search for articles on the 'net and you’ll find out yourself.

xv’s right. Mills just says that momentum is the key factor and uses Lincecum as an example of how someone can do that. He never said that Lincecum uses his specific techniques of generating and utilizing momentum.

he uses what is called "the vertigo effect"
it is hard to master because of control problems
he leans back until he is about to fall and uses that momentum to throw the ball

his mechanics have been changed to accomodate being in the MLB

look up vertigo effect on yahoo

i tried to look up vertigo effect and nothing came up that was realated to baseball
can u tell me instead

i may have spelled vertigo wrong anyways
when you go into your stride
you lean back towards 1st base(if your a righty)
you feel your off balence
and it forces yopu to regain balence

just keep leaning back when you stride
but you have to have a long stride for it to work

when you feel that your about to fall backwards throw/pitch the ball
it is very hard to master
thats why you dont see others do it

they even changed lincecum’s mechanics but he still uses it a little
it causes you to whip your upper body and arm

i couldn’t find th article any more eitherbut i saved it to my computer

Triggers windup with big rock step back to 1B, bouncing into light, easy, high leg kick which turns his entire back to hitter in Jim Beattie-, Kevin Brown-style.

Lincecum’s head turns to look at 3B coaching box at conclusion of wind - any less head turn would cramp his neck. Despite this hyper-rotation, his head is directly over his plant foot at the top, providing perfect balance throughout the windup.

Begins the cocking action with a very deep single-leg squat thrust — this deep squat prepares what may be the longest stride (per body length) in the history of pitching.

As Lincecum squats effortlessly, he splays his front leg and splays both arms to give him the famous pinwheel effect. His rear arm extends fully for a moment before beginning acceleration.

To accelerate the baseball, Tim Lincecum leaps so far off the pitching rubber that his front foot may in fact land in front of Randy Johnson’s. At the same time, Lincecum uncoils his upper torso into its huge 235-degree turn. The combination of the forward thrust and the centrifugal action creates an Ichiro-like leveraging.

The first minor complaint is that despite the extreme rotation, Lincecum still over-rotates his upper arm behind his back, which in theory creates danger to the rear rotator cuff and labrum. Many ML pitchers do the same thing, so the complaint is not decisive.

At release, his shoulders are radically angled 10:30-to-4:30 from the catcher’s point of view, giving him a true straight-overhand delivery. This combined with his long arms give Lincecum a release point that is actually higher than average and a nice downhill slope to his fastball.

The second minor complaint is that Lincecum leans back at the waist throughout acceleration. This poses no health concern, but creates an unbalanced “vertigo” effect that costs him command. Randy Johnson achieved his turning point precisely by learning to lean forward a bit, rather than backward, during acceleration. Lincecum could also do this with no danger to his phenomenal leverage.

In deceleration, his front foot is so exceptionally far forward that by the time his center of gravity travels over his foot, his energy is dissipated and he finishes with a very graceful, balanced bounce down the centerline.

His arm clears smoothly and deceleration is picture-perfect.

Centerline - his head stays on the centerline beautifully and after the initial rock, his entire body weight is extremely “true” down the CL with a rare nose-to-leather finish. As noted earlier, the quality of his forward acceleration is unparalleled. From an aiki standpoint his movement down the CL is far better than that of most MLB pitching stars.

Balance - Lincecum’s one important flaw is that he leans slightly backward during acceleration and as he releases the pitch. This is the source of his command problems, as it was Randy Johnson’s earlier in the Big Unit’s career. Lincecum can pitch with the lean and show acceptable control - see the first POTD. Or he can learn to use the same motion with a bit less backward lean and improve his command.

Body Control - has exceptional strength-to-weight ratio, allowing him the luxury of the knee bend and leap, pitch after pitch, without tiring. Acceleration is smooth, effortless, and extremely powerful.

Summary - body and movements remind very much of Ichiro throughout. Light, sure power, extreme body control, with exceptional leveraging.

[quote]when you go into your stride
you lean back towards 1st base(if your a righty)
you feel your off balence
and it forces yopu to regain balence

just keep leaning back when you stride
but you have to have a long stride for it to work

when you feel that your about to fall backwards throw/pitch the ball
it is very hard to master
thats why you dont see others do it

they even changed lincecum’s mechanics but he still uses it a little
it causes you to whip your upper body and arm[/quote]

dono if id say thats right. he keeps more balance while falling to plate, also keeping his shoulders pretty stable during it. he uses back leg to get really low while maintaining balance then the front let sweeps through that low zone hes created and pulls his hips forward quickly so that his shoulders have a lil less time to react which seems to keep them back more. check out hip shoulder seperation, its not thats hes completley offbalance its just that he gains alot of length on the stretch before the leg even comes through zone by droping down with back turned

since being in the MLB
pitching coaches from the giants have changed his mechanics
to prevent arm injuries and help his control

look at his mechanics while he was in college

he used to be able to hit 100 miles per hous plus
but now it rest around 98

still good velocity