Tim Lincecum Mechanics

I need explanations as to how Tim Lincecum gets the extra distance in his stride while staying closed and then turning his hips to get his hip shoulder separation…i think i remember hearing something about him using his front leg to reach out for the extra distance but i need some clarity on this to help this pitcher friend of mine who is 5’7’’ and trying to gain velocity while already having the rest of his mechanics solid.

Thanks

It’s kind of a pain that Tim Lincicum had to come around and be a 5’10 165 lb pitcher who throws mid 90s because now everyone thinks if they throw like him they will throw harder.

I truly believe that Tim Lincicum is a freak of nature. The way he was built genetically and how he was raised throwing is how he throws hard being an undersized righty.

He is an idol to all undersized rightys but at the same time he gives false hope.

I think the move you are referring to is known as the “stepover.” If you look at a clip of lincecum you’ll notice that his glove side foot seems to step over an imaginary object right before he lands. This gives him that extra stride length and hence his increased hip and shoulder separation.

Maineball is right though, take into account that lincecum is a freak of nature along the same lines of roy oswalt. They have tremendously quick arms and are very explosive. One aspect of lincecum’s physiology that people don’t mention or underestimate is his groin flexibility. This allows him to take a long stride while keeping his hips closed.

I do believe however that there are aspects of their deliveries that we can all learn from such as the stepover. You may never throw 98 but you may gain a couple mph’s.

I do realize what you’re saying about the lincecum craze that has arised since he has come up but basically he is the shortest pitcher that i have as an example and i used others like nolan ryan and josh beckett to explain to my friend the explosiveness and arm action that he was looking for but now we’ve hit a wall and this step over move may very well be the key to what he needs to gain mph

How old is your friend? Are they done growing? If this isn’t the case my advice would be to throw and keep throwing. Longtossing does wonders for MPH as you’re growing.

My friend is a senior in high school and yes he’s done growing he may get another half inch but no more his parents are both really short and although he does play good outfield he loves pitching so i dont wanna end his time at that and he does have good stuff to get to the next level i just am trying to find a way to really improve his velocity and aside from a few minor adjustments the step over is most likely what i need to use on him.

Flexibility.

CHeers;

O

haha very short and to the point “flexibility” of the groin and back/core i assume would be the primary concern yes that’s a good point to and he’s been working on that.

Tim Lincecum is NOT a freak! He is a pitcher who learned at a young age how to build and transfer energy powerfully and effectively through his body.

They said the same defeatist remarks about Roger Bannister when he broke the 4 minute mile. He was a white Englishmen who loved to run. With a little bit of knowledge of physics and some hard work he did the impossible.

The “Stepover” theory is wrong. Just like when you see a car traveling down the street and the hub caps look like they are spinning the opposite way.

Tim’s front leg is flying out to the plate but that is only the effect of the back leg. If I wanted you to jump a bike off of a ramp you wouldn’t propel the ramp under the bike. You would propel the bike over the ramp.

It is called Triple Extension. This is the full extension of the ankle, knee, and hip flexor. It isn’t just about Triple extension it is about the timing of the triple extension.

Read my article about this philosophy:
Olympic Lifting Increases Pitching Velocity
http://acepitcher.com/article1.html

I agree with you somewhat in that there is an “extension” of the back leg to push your weight towards home plate but beyond that phase lincecum does reach out to gain more distance by using his front leg. In addition, if he were to “jump” he would have no velocity because he would have no foundation: try jumping from one leg to the other and see how slow the ball comes out i promise you. So i agree with you half way but i will explore the step over and see where it may improve my friend…
ps. I agree Lincecum is not a freak he is just a revolutionary mechanical being

Watch how Lincecum gets his front hip moving toward the target before his lift leg comes down. His centre of gravity is ahead of this leg motion and the swinging outward of it assists with momentum generation. Then watch the timing of his arm action. It’s very late and he builds up speed rapidly. Paul Nyman has a good description of this on his SETPRO site. I can’t seem to find that spot again on his site but the following link has some interesting discussion about Lincecum. The thread eventually requires paid registration but the discussion you can see is interesting.

http://www.setpro.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8811

[quote=“Hauser33”]Tim Lincecum is NOT a freak! He is a pitcher who learned at a young age how to build and transfer energy powerfully and effectively through his body.

They said the same defeatist remarks about Roger Bannister when he broke the 4 minute mile. He was a white Englishmen who loved to run. With a little bit of knowledge of physics and some hard work he did the impossible.

The “Stepover” theory is wrong. Just like when you see a car traveling down the street and the hub caps look like they are spinning the opposite way.

Tim’s front leg is flying out to the plate but that is only the effect of the back leg. If I wanted you to jump a bike off of a ramp you wouldn’t propel the ramp under the bike. You would propel the bike over the ramp.

It is called Triple Extension. This is the full extension of the ankle, knee, and hip flexor. It isn’t just about Triple extension it is about the timing of the triple extension.

Read my article about this philosophy:
Olympic Lifting Increases Pitching Velocity
http://acepitcher.com/article1.html[/quote]

Your triple extension theory is flawed because it is based in linear momentum instead of angular/rotational momentum. The rear legs role is to support the body while it is moving toward the plate and it does not extend by way of a push, it extends by way of dragging. Your triple extension theory actually fits Mike Marshall’s mechanics very well because his mechanics are linear-based.

[quote=“xv84”]Your triple extension theory is flawed because it is based in linear momentum instead of angular/rotational momentum. The rear legs role is to support the body while it is moving toward the plate and it does not extend by way of a push, it extends by way of dragging. Your triple extension theory actually fits Mike Marshall’s mechanics very well because his mechanics are linear-based.[/quote]There’s nothing that says that the Triple Extension idea precludes rotation and makes things completely linear. Just think about Nyman’s “flat bed, merry-go-round, ferris wheel” analogy.

I just feel as that if it were that easy there would be more 5’10 160 pitchers throwing in the 90’s and they arn’t.

I also feel as though these mechanics would put someone of a larger frame even farther over the edge and have them throwing rediculous numbers.

[quote=“Hauser33”]Tim Lincecum is NOT a freak! He is a pitcher who learned at a young age how to build and transfer energy powerfully and effectively through his body.

They said the same defeatist remarks about Roger Bannister when he broke the 4 minute mile. He was a white Englishmen who loved to run. With a little bit of knowledge of physics and some hard work he did the impossible.

The “Stepover” theory is wrong. Just like when you see a car traveling down the street and the hub caps look like they are spinning the opposite way.

Tim’s front leg is flying out to the plate but that is only the effect of the back leg. If I wanted you to jump a bike off of a ramp you wouldn’t propel the ramp under the bike. You would propel the bike over the ramp.

It is called Triple Extension. This is the full extension of the ankle, knee, and hip flexor. It isn’t just about Triple extension it is about the timing of the triple extension.

Read my article about this philosophy:
Olympic Lifting Increases Pitching Velocity
http://acepitcher.com/article1.html[/quote]

I totally agree that Lincecum does a lot of thing very well mechanically that allow him to throw cheese, but he is a freak. How many people, much less one of his stature, have that combination of flexibility, explosion, and overall athleticism? Not many!

[quote=“throwinched”]How many people, much less one of his stature, have that combination of flexibility, explosion, and overall athleticism? Not many![/quote]I’d say there are plenty who CAN. It’s just that he actually put in the work and DID it.

I can’t prove it, but my general feeling is “short” pitchers are never encouraged or instructed as much. They usually become middle infielders or outfielders.

I love the optimism, but Lincecum is 5’10 and 160-170 lbs, and i’ve read that his physique is nothing impressive. He throws 95-100 mph! Now I have no doubt that he puts a lot of work into his craft and that he made it happen for himself, but I think we need to respect the fact that the ability to throw 95-100 is a gift from god that very few have been given. To say there are plenty of people walking around with the ability to throw 95+ is a bit naive. Is it a goal that many aspire to and work hard at? Yes. Do some reach their goal? Yes, but they had to have that gift first and then nurture it. I just don’t buy that there are plenty of people walking around with 95 mph arms…unless you’re in the dominican :stuck_out_tongue:

i totally agree with you throwinch

He’s not super-human, gents. There are plenty of small-ish guys out there who are fantastic athletes, like Lincecum, who could do what he is if they did the same things.