Thrusting chest forward

when i watch videos of mlb pitchers alot of them have an arc in their back like they are thrusting forward their chest while they are squared to the plate. is this what they do? does this just happen or is it something that you should try to do?

It’s a result of scap loading.

according to setpro, that arch is the scaps/shoulder/pechs getting ready to unload.

IMO the “thrust” comes from a combination of “scap loading”, seperation, and intent. Separation being the torque created through keeping your shoulders closed while the hips open. To me, much of the previously mentioned “scap loading” loading comes from intent. Ron Wolforth preaches that you can’t throw hard without the intent to throw hard. I think that, in large part, if the intent is there, you will naturally load your scaps. I would be careful when focusing on scap loading because, when done wrong, it can create timing issues. IMO if you concentrate on scap loading with your chest and not your back it should help make it a smoother load.

Yeah someone else knows SetPro stuff!!!I think I like this guy!!!Great post!!!Welcome to the forums!!!

when in the delivery should you start to scap load?

I believe that scap loading should happen as a result of doing other things well.

Also, noone has mentioned it yet but there is also an element of the delivery whereby the low back holds the upper torso upright in a momentary isometric load. During this load, there is an arch in the low back. Right about the time the arm starts forward, the low back releases and the trunk flexes forward.

In laymen terms, “Scap Loading” occurs when the lower half has committed and the upper half has not.

The focus should be on building momentum with the lift leg and hips, while the shoulders and head anchor over back leg.

The timing of separation occurs when the hips and lift leg can not go any farther down the hill, your front foot has landed, your hips have committed to the target and your scaps are pinched. Now we transfer the momentum as quick as possible.

[quote=“■■■■■■■■■■■.net”]In laymen terms, “Scap Loading” occurs when the lower half has committed and the upper half has not.

The focus should be on building momentum with the lift leg and hips, while the shoulders and head anchor over back leg.

[/quote]
Building momentum with the lower half? Absolutely. But I’m not sure about "anchoring the head and shoulders over the back leg. In that picture, the pitcher seems to be reaching with the front foot. It’s not clear he really generated momentum with his hips. Comments?

I think Buccholz is “reaching” to maintain dynamic balance. As for “anchoring the head and shoulders over the back leg”, I believe ■■■■■■■■■■■ mean it in terms of “feel” not a literal “look”.

As for momentum, it’s a still pic, and I can’t say either way because I don’t want to sound like O’Leary.

I know it’s off-topic, but its 10-0 Boston in that game. Orioles suck.

I think Buccholz is “reaching” to maintain dynamic balance. As for “anchoring the head and shoulders over the back leg”, I believe ■■■■■■■■■■■ mean it in terms of “feel” not a literal “look”.

As for momentum, it’s a still pic, and I can’t say either way because I don’t want to sound like O’Leary.[/quote]
I think you’re both saying the same thing different ways. To me the key in that photo is simply that his weight is still back. It is very similar to hitting. The “load” phase in hitting is all about getting your body stacked over your back foot, meaning you could draw a straight line from the head, through the back shoulder, down through the back knee, and all the way to the foot. In this photo, Bucholz is “anchored” over his back foot simply meaning that his weight isn’t leaking forward. Keeping your weight back will almost always look like “reaching” with your plant foot. Really, not a lot has happened at this point other than the fact that he has put his body in optimal position for the “explosion” towards the plate.

Off topic: Have you guys read the SI article on Lincecum? Probably one of my favorite articles ever. Here’s the link:

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2008/writers/tom_verducci/07/01/lincecum0707/index.html

The chest thrust forward is actually a result of great thoracic extension and rotation. The thoracic spine needs to have good extension and rotation to be able to throw at high velocities. If you look at your harder throwers like zumaya, verlander, wagner they get great extension. Its not at the lumbar spine either. Great thoracic extension and rotation will keep your shoulder healthy as well.

You can’t have thoracic extension without drooped shoulders. Drooped shoulders are caused by protracted shoulder blades. Scap loading would be retracting the shoulder blades via the rhomboids.

Thoracic extension is caused by the lower trapezius and erector spinae. In other words, muscles of the back. Focusing on the muscles of the back promotes thoracic extension, as well as scapular retraction.

Below is protraction on the left and retraction on the right.