Throwing arm reaching too far behind back?


#1

My son has gotten into a habit of getting his throwing arm back quite a bit toward 1st base(he is right-handed). I don’t know a lot about pitching mechanics, but this looks like it would put a lot of strain on his shoulder. Is this as nad for him as it looks and if so, does anyone have a drill that can cure this?

Thanks

Mike


#2

Got video?

By the way, I know what “nads” are but not in the context of your post. :mrgreen:


#3

Roger

I am trying to come up with video. When I do, I will post it.

I think this may hurt his arm, but if it affects his nads, we have bigger problems. I think I meant ‘bad’.

Mike


#4

Now that’s funny! :lol:

It’s hard to say if your son’s backswing might cause harm. It’s common for pitchers to extend beyond straight back (i.e. more than 180 degrees). Tom House, in his book, The Pitching Edge, lists a number of top MLB pitchers and their backswing angle and they are all greater than 180 degrees. On the other hand, there may be a point beyond which is dangerous.

Is it just his arm extending back that far or is he is reverse-rotating the shoulders as well?


#5

Roger

He does not seem to be reverse rotating his shoulders. It is just his arm.
I have seen a few successful pitchers do this. I am just wondering if this is putting undue stress on his arm.

Mike


#6

I can only speculate.

On one hand, the accelerator muscles and the other front-side connective tissues need to be loaded up prior to shoulder rotation. “Loaded up” just means stretched so there is no slack. A person who has more flexibility than another will have to abduct the arm further to achieve that load than will the person with less flexibility.

Now, looseness in the shoulder joint is another thing. I suppose joint looseness could be confused with flexibility although I’d like to think that joint looseness might be accompanied by pain. But I’m not a doctor so I don’t really know for sure.

It is my opinion that any time the joints are operating at the edge of their range of motion, they are more vulnerable to injury. This is the case when the arm is abducted back and then the shoulders rotate forward. The one thing that I know to suggest paying attention to is to make sure he’s not opening up the shoulders early as that does place more stress on the arm.