Thrower's Ten

The Thrower’s Ten program was recommended to me for my 10 year old.

Really? At 10 years of age?

Is this appropriate? It seems like overkill.

I thought that until puberty sets in, there is little if anything to gain from a strength program, and much to lose, i.e., injury.

:?:

There are ten-year-olds, and there are ten-year-olds. No two are alike, and no two have the same requirements. Now, I have no idea what the “thrower’s ten” program is, but I’ll venture a guess that it’s an arm strength conditioning program, and what may be too much for one kid at that age might be just what another kid needs. It’s a highly individual matter, and the only thing to do is find out exactly what’s involved and have your particular ten-year-old give it a shot and see how he likes it. In any event, don’t try to do too much all at once—ease into it. 8)

[quote=“south paw”]The Thrower’s Ten program was recommended to me for my 10 year old.

Really? At 10 years of age?

Is this appropriate? It seems like overkill.

I thought that until puberty sets in, there is little if anything to gain from a strength program, and much to lose, i.e., injury.

:?:[/quote]

My son did the Thrower’s Ten @ 10 and 11. Light weights and resistance. Purpose is to tone the muscles, not to build bulk. This year basketball is much tougher and physically exhausting, so he’ll be in great shape once spring rolls around. He’s also considered a big boy for his age. He’s 12 and is 5’-9", 160 Lbs.

Hi Zita,

Yes, you are correct. It is a strength and conditioning program. ASMI sells a booklet on it - http://www.asmi.org/asmiweb/throwers10.htm - but I haven’t been able to find any information on the program itself at the ASMI website.

I understand the program involves drills with a rubber band and possibly light weights. However, I have always understood that strength programs (e.g., weight lifting) should not be used until a boy reaches or is past puberty.

Also, my son, who just turned 10, is healthy and throws quite hard for his age - so why would I place him in a strength program? It seems like overkill.

Hopefully others here have experience with the Thrower’s Ten program and its suitability for 10 year olds.

Here is a link to the program:

http://ckm.osu.edu/sitetool/sites/sportsmedicinepublic/documents/Rehabilitation_Protocols_2010/Throwers_Ten_Exercises_2010.pdf

[quote=“south paw”]

Also, my son, who just turned 10, is healthy and throws quite hard for his age - so why would I place him in a strength program? It seems like overkill.

Hopefully others here have experience with the Thrower’s Ten program and its suitability for 10 year olds.[/quote]

You want to keep the muscles in the shoulder toned and strong, especially with a young, hard thrower. It’s not going to keep him from breaking his arm playing bike tag at night:), but it will strengthen the shoulder and keep him from hurting his arm from pitching. Rowing is another good exercise for a young pitcher.

All of our local 12U team pitchers this year had arm problems, and none of them throws as hard as my son. A big part of the problem is overuse, but the other part is they’re still growing and not strong enough to pitch Major league innings. Half of the kids injured their growth plate and should have sat out a quarter and rested.

Did they all do Thrower’s Ten before the arm problems?

My particular concern is the suitability of Thrower’s Ten for prepubescent boys (mine is 10). The medical community (at least in my area) is unanimous that boys should not do ANY weight exercises or training until puberty. However, the Thrower’s Ten program appears entirely weight-based (the rubber band exercises are nothing but a variant of the weight training stations one sees on a gym weight machine).

I wish ASMI, which has provided so much useful information on youth pitching, had information on whether Thrower’s Ten is suitable for prepubescent boys. Maybe it has, I just haven’t been able to find it.

A more general concern is that these days there are so many “latest and greatest” things that are “must do” for youth pitchers and their parents - year round baseball, travel ball, Thrower’s Ten, etc. - but we really have no knowledge what the long term effect of these things will be. In this sense, the kids are basically guinea pigs. Kinda like our our parents were with smoking, and we are today with cell phones. :?

Did they all do Thrower’s Ten before the arm problems?[/quote]

No. But they did play baseball 12 months on multiple teams. One threw over 4000 pitches last year! In comparison, my son threw under 500 and would have been limited to 1100 pitches if he didn’t break his arm.

Because my son throws hard, and it’s the hard throwers that see surgeons, we see a sports orthopedic specialist on a yearly basis to have him evaluated. He recommended daily stretching (done when he’s watching TV), resistant bands and light weights to tome the muscles - not to build bulk, but to strengthen his muscles - floor balls and rowing machine.[/quote]

We’re also not following the crowd with travel ball, elite teams, multiple teams, etc. My son’s desire is to play LL with the little kids, have pitching/batting lessons and play with the neighbors and ride bikes on the weekend. He doesn’t want to chase baseball games when he’s 12. He’ll rejoin his peers on the diamond in HS.

Maybe ask this question here http://asmiforum.proboards.com/index.cgi
My son is 10 yrs old as well and I am not so sure about this program for him either.

Actually, ASMI puts out two booklets. One is a straight conditioning program for pitchers. The other is a rehabilitation program, which includes the “Thrower’s Ten”. Somehow I don’t think your kid needs the rehab program, but the other one might be worth a look. 8)

UPDATE:

Here is some information I found on the ASMI forum that at least appears to say Throwers Ten is not suitable for really young pitchers not in rehabilitation:

[quote]Jeremy Geus, ATC, CSCS
ASMI Affiliate

Nearly forgot, we have used these exercises with athletes at that age [9] for the purpose of rehabilitation but I would be a little concerned about performing that large a volume of resistance activity for a 9 year old.

Read more: http://asmiforum.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=youth&action=display&thread=318#ixzz1g2ob3GD7[/quote]

Just my two cents;

The kids you guys are talking about are 10 years old, correct?
Worrying about strength and conditioning programs for 10 year olds seems to be overkill. These kids need to be just that, KIDS.

At 10 they need to be shielded from overthrowing and overuse. I know we all want what’s best for our kids, but a 10 year old needing a pitcher’s conditioning program is, in my opinion, ridiculous.

I understand preventing injury and staying in shape. How about letting them be kids? Run around, climb trees, play on jungle gyms. They will stay flexible and in shape. Want to prevent injuries? Limit the number of pitches they throw. Limit the number of times they take the mound.

At 10 they need to learn how to pitch. They need to learn solid basics to their mechanics. I guarantee their mechanics will modify and change as they grow and get stronger, so if they learn solid basic mehanics at this younger age it will be easier to maintain their mechanics and modify anything as needed when they hit their growth spurts.

I know right now some are studs and throw really hard for 10, but things change. Some burn out, some don’t progress to the college level. Heck, some don’t progress to the HS level.

My own son was one of those kids that at 10 was not very athletic and didn’t throw particularly hard. He wasn’t selected for the elite teams. What he did do was work on his mechanics with his pitching coach and played on lesser AA teams. Bottom line is he worked hard but still played like a kid. Funny thing happened when he hit 13, 14. He started “growing into his body”. He got naturally stronger, and bigger. he is only 15 now but he’s 6’1" , 180 lbs. Now he is lifting and conditioning for HS ball, but it is his solid mechanics that allow him to throw his fastball at 82-84.

Basics first then conditioning.

Turn 22,

Yes, my son just turned 10. I agree with everything you say. It not only seems like overkill, my gut instinct is that it’s not healthy and likely outright dangerous for a 10 (or 11 or 12) year old.

I was a little taken aback when I heard that 10, 9, and even 8 year olds around here are doing Throwers Ten under the auspices of a local pitching coach.

Parents are insane.

Couldn’t agree more, southpaw.

Like I stated before kids need to be kids. No matter how hard they throw or what elite team a ten year old plays on he should in no way be concerned with programs that are designed for older guys.