This one's tricky.. espeically if no one's paying attention


#1

There’s a hit-n-run play on, so the runner on first takes off like a shot as soon as the pitcher starts to deliver.

At the crack of the bat, the SS fields the ball clean - the batter runner starts to give up on making it to first … but, the SS throws the ball to second but never really has a chance to gun down R1.

The second baseman, seeing the batter runner stalled, makes a wild throw to first - but it rockets over the first baseman’s head and goes into dead territory … before the batter runner can touch first base.

Place R1 and the batter runner - per Official Baseball Rules. (MLB)

Coach B.


#2

I’d put R1 scores and BR on 2nd.


#3

This is the same for MLB and high school. Pustulio is correct. R1 gets home and BR gets 2nd.

7.05 Each runner including the batter-runner may, without liability to be put out, advance—

(g) Two bases when, with no spectators on the playing field, a thrown ball goes into the stands, or into a bench (whether or not the ball rebounds into the field), or over or under or through a field fence, or on a slanting part of the screen above the backstop, or remains in the meshes of a wire screen protecting spectators. The ball is dead. When such wild throw is the first play by an infielder, the umpire, in awarding such bases, shall be governed by the position of the runners at the time the ball was pitched; in all other cases the umpire shall be governed by the position of the runners at the time the wild throw was made;

Runners are always awarded two bases on an overthrow from a fielder (one from the pitcher). The question is two bases from where? It is from the time of the pitch when it is the first play by an infielder and it is from the time of the throw otherwise. Since this was the second play by an infielder, it is two bases from the time of the throw. R1 was on second, so he gets home and the BR was not yet to first, so he gets second.


#4

… the SS before the batter runner can touch first base.

Check out … 7.05 APPROVE RULING … see if things look a little different?

…The term “when the wild throw was made” means when the throw actually left the player’s hand and not when the thrown ball hit the ground, passes a receiving fielder or goes out of play into the stands.
The position of the batter-runner at the time the wild throw left the thrower’s hand is the key in deciding the award of bases. The decision as to whether the batter-runner has reached first base before the throw is a judgment call.

Coach B.


#5

Well, let’s see now … you’re the fielding team … both you and the other club have slug it out for … oh… twelve innings, and the score is all tied up.
It’s the play of the inning with two outs.

Would you walk off the field - calling the game a loss, after watching R1 walk himself all the way to home plate on the assumption of some rule in baseball about awarding two bases? Or, would you challenge R1’s travel to home plate with an appeal?

Coach B.


#6

Coach Baker,

I am pretty sure that the note you quoted is pertaining only to the first play by an infielder. It is clarifying the fact that when the throw is the first by an infielder, awards are made from the time of the pitch, not the time of the throw UNLESS all runners (including the batter-runner) have already advanced at least one base at the time of the throw. If all runners have already advanced one base, then the awards are from the time of the throw, rather than the time of the pitch. But all of this refers only to the first play by an infielder.

In your situation, since the play was not the first, bases are awarded from the time of the throw. I would have to accept the 12th inning defeat based on the rules. It would be hard to swallow, though. :cry: