This is really bothering me (video UPDATED #2)


#1

When pitching, should it feal easy on the arm, like the body is rotating and arm is just coming along?
Or should i turn hips,shoulders + swing my arm hard?

I hope u understand, since my english isn’t the best.

On more thing. About arm slot. My arm slot is very low, i release ball at my head level, and if i put my arm more higher at high cocked position, then my elbow is a bit over my back shoulder.
What should i do, maybe lower my front shoulder so my back shoulder gets up a bit?

Thanks!


#2

[quote=“Nikae09”]When pitching, should it feal easy on the arm, like the body is rotating and arm is just coming along?
Or should i turn hips,shoulders + swing my arm hard?

I hope u understand, since my english isn’t the best.

On more thing. About arm slot. My arm slot is very low, i release ball at my head level, and if i put my arm more higher at high cocked position, then my elbow is a bit over my back shoulder.
What should i do, maybe lower my front shoulder so my back shoulder gets up a bit?

Thanks![/quote]you should put as much effort into throwing as you can, as long as your mechanics stay the same and you still have control of your pitches, i dont think throwing is really a swinging motion, although, arm mechanics arent really my strong area of pitching, dm roger or chris usually have good advice on that point


#3

I think your focus should be on what you body is doing rather than what your arm is doing. Turning your hips ahead of your shoulders will cause them to pull your shoulders and thus your arm around.

That’s what people mean when they talk about throwing with your body and not just your arm, and your arm being just along for the ride.


#4

I have a video clip of me pitching, but its too large. Which program can I use to cut out only a part of it?

Its a .mov video that i recorded with my digital camera.


#5

[quote=“Nikae09”]I have a video clip of me pitching, but its too large. Which program can I use to cut out only a part of it?

Its a .mov video that i recorded with my digital camera.[/quote]

QuickTime Pro will let you cut clips down to a shorter length and smaller size.


#6

ok here are the clips of me pitching

Keep in mind that i am total biginner, and that i never pitched before in my life. I tried to use mechanics found on Chris O’learys site…thanks for that man :slight_smile:

and at second one i tried to lift my arm up a bit, to get higher arm slot:

I think i dont have that “whip” of the arm, do I?
Actually this is probablly the worst pitching u ever saw :slight_smile:

Anyways, fell free to critique. I have about 40-45 days to practice before the first game.

note: i dont hit strike zone often. (about 40% are strikes…sometimes less).


#7

Looks like you could use more power in your leg lift and then drive it into leg plant … plus, it looks like you could rotate your shoulder more forcefully, think about pulling your glove back into your left side as you bring your throwing arm around.


#8

In Tom Houses book he says that this is a myth. He says that you are accually supposed to bring your torso to your glove and after the glove is tucked at the armpit it doesnt come back towards the body.


#9

Definitely NOT the worst pitching I have seen. I think your mechanics are fairly decent. You are smooth but you do lack some explosiveness. A higher knee lift along with getting the hips going faster will let you build up more momentum which can be transferred to hip and shoulder rotation and out to the arm.

Also, when you bend your back leg to initiate your stride, you also lean back towards 2B. I’d suggest starting with your knees bent a bit and see if that lets you avoid leaning back. You do want the head and shoulders to stay slightly behind the front hip into foot strike but you don’t want a significant lean.

I don’t think you should worry about your arm slot. And I would NOT try to pull the glove back. You do a good job of keeping the glove up in front. You also maintain good posture and you don’t fly open.


#10

First thanks for replys all.

Second…hmmmm, i tought some leaning back as i stride (to keep my weight back) is good, 'cause i saw it from frame by frame analysis of some mlb pitchers.

In that video, i didnt want to throw hard, cause my brother (cathcer) didnt have catchers gear on him.

Ok, i will rework mechanics as you said, make another video and post it here.

What should i do to improve my control? I just cant throw strikes often! :frowning:


#11

[quote=“Nikae09”]First thanks for replys all.

Second…hmmmm, i tought some leaning back as i stride (to keep my weight back) is good, 'cause i saw it from frame by frame analysis of some mlb pitchers.[/quote]
In hindsight, this is a minor issue. Maybe because you weren’t throwing hard and your tempo wasn’t very fast it created the appearance of leaning back more then you really did.

I didn’t realize that. I assumed that was how hard you normally throw.

Mke sure you are throwing as hard as you would in a game.

Practice, practice and more practice. Start by getting your mechanics worked out and then get them to be repeatable. Then your control should improve.


#12

Nikae,
I won’t say anything about your mechanics other than I agree with about everything that Roger has written.

As far as control goes he is right that you’ll need to practice, practice, practice.

Here’s an approach you might want to incorporate into your bullpens to help you work on your control. Once you are fully warmed up have your catcher set up with the target a foot off the outside corner at the knees. Throw 4 or 5 pitches to that location. Then have him set up a foot off the inside corner and do the same. Then have your catcher set up on the outside corner at the knees and throw 4 or 5 pitches. Then have him set up on the inside corner and do the same. After that work on your off speed pitches for a bit, then finish up throwing to a couple simulated batters and if your arm still feels strong you might want to then throw up to about 10 pitches for velocity, but be careful with that.

Throwing to simulated batters simply means pretending that you are pitching to a batter with the target being set where it would be in a game and the pitches being called based on the count. Don’t throw only fastballs though, make sure you throw an off speed pitch every third pitch or so at least regardless of the count. That’ll force you to learn to get your off speed pitches over and also will help you learn to switch back and forth between your off speed pitches and your fastball without losing command.

When you start getting a better feel for your location and being able to keep the ball at the knees or lower on a fairly consistent basis then you can also start working in the high inside and high outside pitches.

This isn’t anything I made up, this is something I found published in somebody’s workout plans on the net. Interestingly enough, I recently saw an article where a MLB pitcher, I believe but am not certain, that it was Jeff Suppan talked about doing a similar workout during his bullpens. I’ve been having my pitchers throw this type of bullpen for about 3 years now.


#13

There is huge variation in what professional pitchers actually do.


#14

I don’t think you look bad at all, considering that you’re a beginner. I have certainly seen worse in guys who have pitched a lot more.

For one thing, you seem to do quite a good job of throwing with your body and not just your arm; you rotate your hips well ahead of your shoulders.

The biggest thing that I see is that you are really landing on the heel of your GS foot. I would prefer that you landed more flat-footed.

The whip will come if you try throwing harder.

Just keep working at it. You’re on the right track.


#15

Thanks for all the advices! Tomorrow i’ll get someone to record me pitching as hard as will in the actuall game. I’ll throw to a wall or something since my bro is a bit afraid of fastballs (he actually never played baseball before).

I will post youtube links again.

See you all soon :slight_smile:


#16

What do you recomend pitchers do with there glove side arm. I just finshed read his book which I got for my birthday and was starting to practise this.


#17

I like what House teaches regarding the glove arm (i.e. opposite and equal). It figures into your balance (by keeping your arms/hands equi-distant from your center of gravity) and your timing (by forcing the arm to take some time out front which means it’s not doing something to cause the shoulders to open up early). I feel most people fail to appreciate the timing aspect.

EDIT: Assuming the book you’re referring to is The Art and Science of Pitching, then the other part of the arm equation is the “Swivel and Stabilize” piece. The elbow tucks down in front of the torso and the glove turns over so the palm faces your chest of face. The chest moves to the glove. This provides for a more stable base for the throwing arm to throw against. I also like this. Some people claim that it takes away from velocity but velocity doesn’t come from the glove arm.


#18

Hey all.

I have recorded myself again but i wont post it because the video is too dark :frowning: . I have tryed what u talled me to, I am not landing on my heel again, and it feals werid. It looks like, i am striding, the when I point my toes towards the target i just “fall” on my foot…fall from about 2-3 inches height, so my body goes forward a bit. It goes forward after that anyways (when i strart rotating my shoulders), so is that ok, or???

I finally realized why i dont have that “whip of the arm”. Its because I am pitching FROM high cocked position (when the ball is over the biceps) not THROUGH high cocked positon (as lots of pitcher do).

So i need to start rotating my shoulder just before the ball comes over my biceps, that way i will get more whip of the arm (my forearm will bounce back)?
At least thats what Curt Schilling does…or am i wrong?

I hope u understand me :slight_smile:


#19

Yea I was refering to the Art and Science of Pitching, it’s a really good book, taught me a lot.


#20

There is huge variation in what professional pitchers actually do.[/quote]

Chris, how would you describe the various techniques used by professional pitchers with respect to the glove side?

I’d say that once the glove becomes established over the front side, most guys keep it there and do move the body to the glove. Then the acceleration from the throwing arm forces the glove side arm to come back in to the body.