Things to write in my hat?


#1

I normally write things in my hat so that when im in a tough situation i go to the hat to relax.
What should I write in my hat?
Are there any good mechaical things i should write?


#2

My first year of little league my coach told me to write something in my hat " No matter the situation your in, dig deep inside and prove that you are the best you can be " and Ive been writing it in my hat ever since the 4th grade (now a soph) it’s helped me K 3 people with the bases loaded in the bottom of the 7th and it could possibly help motivate you, highly recommend


#3

There’s plenty of good ones, but here’s a few…

K.I.S.S. - Keep It Simple Stupid - This can help remind you to just keep pitching basic…just throw the ball

O.T.S.S. - Only the Strong Survive - Pretty self-explanitory

Just Believe - No matter how bad the situation might get, belief and confidence in yourself can pull you through anything

Strike 1 - Remind yourself what the most important pitch in baseball is

Next pitch - It’s the only pitch that you can throw and control…any pitches in the past are long gone and you shouldn’t be thinking about any pitches in the future, just focus on the “next pitch”


#4

is there anything for mechaincs checkdown?


#5

When you are on the mound, you really shouldn’t be thinking about mechanics at all. When you are on the mound, it is game time. The more that you think about mechanics, the more of a chance you have to just mentally mess yourself up. If you are going to think about anything mechanical it should be just one mental cue. And you should only go to it when you are all over the place…For me, that cue would be something like “stay closed.” But, like I said, it should be one thing, and it should be very simple. No need to get caught up with mechanics on the mound when you have to worry about throwing strikes and getting outs.


#6

The two basics that I dont write but I always tell myself for when I need to throw better…“hit your balance point” “stay back”


#7

I dont actually write in my hat, but i try to bring life to the team when we’re in a tough spot. I tell the team to have fun its only a game, but more importantly i tell my self


#8

[quote=“alanshadow22”]The two basics that I dont write but I always tell myself for when I need to throw better…“hit your balance point” “stay back”[/quote]I strongly disagree with both of these cues.


#9

May I ask why you totally disagree. These are just checkpoints that I need to fix when I may be struggling. For example I may high and armside for me, staying back and hitting my balance point are the things I need to do. Adding to hitting my balance point, its a way of slowing myself down and keep from rushing. I have found in my own experience that when I focus on hitting my balance point I slow myself down and throw more strikes. I hope I wasn’t trying to make it seem like I was telling anyone else what to do. These are just things I need to do for my own success.


#10

“Hitting your balance point” is something that many recommend. I’m not one of those. I don’t see value in it. There’s a thread on another site (hsbaseballweb.com) about this and you get discussion favouring both sides. My “belief”, and that’s all it is, is that one should not focus on a point like this as it CAN, not definitely will, result in an unproductive pause in the overall motion. I prefer getting the front hip moving toward the target either at or slightly before the knee reaches it’s apex. Many high level, hard throwing MLB pitchers do this. Many go to the balance point also. If the balance point is of value, why not start there?

“Staying back” is a much misunderstood cue also. It CAN be the killer of moving forward, depending on how you view it.

I would say that your intention of not “rushing” is great, but that depends on your definition of rushing. I suggest that it’s possible to move your centre of gravity toward the target relatively quickly without rushing the upper body. It’s a postural issue and Roger can speak to that quite well.


#11

I always repeat “elbow up” in my mind because if my elbow isn’t up my control goes to crap.


#12

Dm,

I see your points and they are well taken. I think that in my specific case these are things that help me. I think in some cases there are many coaches out there who do not know a lick about pitching and some players need to be their own coaches as you and some of the other people on this site who are well informed obviously cannot help everyone of us.

Your point on staying back is completely correct. I agree with what you said I guess when I tell myself to stay back its my way of really not falling forward, because sometimes I tend to really fall forward before I stride out.

I see what you are saying the balance point also. Again, this is just a self-check method of making sure I am slow and fluid and not rushing through my windup. You are probably right that these are not things every pitcher should tell themselves because you do not want to solely focus on these when you are on the mound. I was just trying to illustrate what I personally need to do sometimes to get back on track. Thanks for your opinion, it is well taken.


#13

Two months ago I suggested that the forward motion begins by gravity as a result of the tilt of the pivot foot. Roger agreed that this was true to some extent. I could be added to the list of those like Roger who can speak to this point.]


#14

I put “consistency” in my hat. I also put “don’t think, just throw” Helps me to stay loose. I know it’s in Bull Durham, but it rings true for me.


#15

“be the best” and i also write my strikeouts in it


#16

While it may work for you, I don’t know if keeping track of strikeouts is something that people should be doing in their hat or even doing it period. Nobody likes a stat watcher and besides that it reinforces some negative thinking when you’re a pitcher.
Problem #1: It motivates you to pitch for a strikeout. You’re thinking should be far from that. Look at someone like Curt Schilling who stated earlier this year that he has matured as a pitcher because he is now pitching “to contact.” The bottom line with this problem is that strikeouts are fascist. Be democratic, spread the ball around. The goal as a pitcher should be “on or out in 3 pitches.” If you can do that by striking the hitter out, then more power to you, but that should not be the goal going into a match-up.
Problem #2: It draws your attention to the strikeout rather than the next pitch. Why focus on pitch number 4 or 5 in an at-bat when the only one that matters at the moment is the next pitch. Pitching is done pitch by pitch, not three or four pitches at a time.
Problem #3: I struggle on seeing how a total number of K’s on your hat can help motivate you. Teammates will see your hat and while they may not say anything to you, they may begin to wonder if you are pitching for yourself or if you are pitching for the team. Are you pitching to get 10 K’s and could care less if your team wins, or are you content with getting the win and having no K’s? You need to pitch to keep your team in the game, rather than keeping track of your K’s. Like I’ve said before, strikeouts are overrated. Give me a rolled-over groundball to the shortstop on the first pitch of the at-bat any day over a 5 pitch K.


#17

While it may work for you, I don’t know if keeping track of strikeouts is something that people should be doing in their hat or even doing it period. Nobody likes a stat watcher and besides that it reinforces some negative thinking when you’re a pitcher.
Problem #1: It motivates you to pitch for a strikeout. You’re thinking should be far from that. Look at someone like Curt Schilling who stated earlier this year that he has matured as a pitcher because he is now pitching “to contact.” The bottom line with this problem is that strikeouts are fascist. Be democratic, spread the ball around. The goal as a pitcher should be “on or out in 3 pitches.” If you can do that by striking the hitter out, then more power to you, but that should not be the goal going into a match-up.
Problem #2: It draws your attention to the strikeout rather than the next pitch. Why focus on pitch number 4 or 5 in an at-bat when the only one that matters at the moment is the next pitch. Pitching is done pitch by pitch, not three or four pitches at a time.
Problem #3: I struggle on seeing how a total number of K’s on your hat can help motivate you. Teammates will see your hat and while they may not say anything to you, they may begin to wonder if you are pitching for yourself or if you are pitching for the team. Are you pitching to get 10 K’s and could care less if your team wins, or are you content with getting the win and having no K’s? You need to pitch to keep your team in the game, rather than keeping track of your K’s. Like I’ve said before, strikeouts are overrated. Give me a rolled-over groundball to the shortstop on the first pitch of the at-bat any day over a 5 pitch K.[/quote]im pretty sure its nothin like that, the whole team does somethin like that, whether it be keeping track of homeruns or rbis, our team dosent really have many palyers that are jealous of each other, we jus go out and pla


#18

I’m glad you brought this up. Some of my teamates write some interesting things in their hats. Mine says 3 things, Relax, Keep GS shoulder locked, and 99! The 99! is a joke with my teamates about a local player who throws 99mph. Everytime a ball makes a good POP sound we all say 99. Even though I only through 88-89.

Dan