The towel drill


#1

Does anyone have a video of the towel drill. I have heard alot of this drill but never found a video to totally explain it. Also does it really have an affect in mechanics or anything


#2

The towel drill allows you to practice your mechanics daily and get in lots of reps without overworking your arm. It also gives you a feedback mechanism to guage yourself.

If you search these forums for the keywords “towel” and “drill” and my user id (“Roger”), you’ll find a number of posts containing my own descriptions of how to do the drill as well as others’ opinions of the drill.


#3

thank u very much for the help


#4

this drill is danderous and is one of the leading causes of injures. please email me at jay21328@aol.com so i can tell you y its not good at all.


#5

[quote=“Jay21328”]THIS DRILL IS DANDEROUS AND IS ONE OF THE LEADING CAUSES OF INJURES. PLEASE EMAIL ME AT JAY21328@AOL.COM SO I CAN TELL YOU Y ITS NOT GOOD AT ALL.[/quote]y dont u just be a man and tell us on here, u afraid we’ll say ur wrong??? :lol:


#6

the one reason with the towel drill is it makes you throw with your arm and not your body. arm hyperexstends. and that causes the UCL Ulmner Ligimeant to go in the danger zone.


#7

[quote=“Jay21328”]…and that causes the UCL Ulmner Ligimeant to go in the danger zone.[/quote]Not that I’m a big fan of the towel drill but you’d have more credibility if you did 2 things.

#1. Spell it right. I’ve never heard of the “Ulmner Ligimeant”.

#2. Give us some references to scientifically supportable studies that support your claim.


#8

Dick Mills the pitching coach for barry zito explains y? look on pitching.com


#9

Dick was pitching coach for Barry Zito for only so long. It’s been a while.

I’m quite familiar with Dick and his teachings/writings. I know why Dick doesn’t like this drill and I’ve never heard him say anything about the UCL and how it causes the arm to hyperextend. His issue with the drill is that he feels it teaches a skill that is not transferrable to real pitching.

I’d be careful of what you attribute to other people. You need to make sure it’s true.


#10

Actually I’m pretty sure Zito was a House guy for a lot longer than Mills may have had him. He does enjoy taking credit for Zito’s success though.


#11

Which specific joint hyperextends? Why does the towel drill supposedly cause this? What does it mean for the UCL to “go into the danger zone”?


#12

Zito’s been to everybody in the world including my son’s throwing coach who Zito still works with and they all take credit.

I’m not a big fan of the towel drill but I don’t see how it is going to damage the UCL unless you really go out of the way to hurt yourself.


#13

Zito’s been to everybody in the world including my son’s throwing coach who Zito still works with and they all take credit.

I’m not a big fan of the towel drill but I don’t see how it is going to damage the UCL unless you really go out of the way to hurt yourself.


#14

[quote=“CADad”]Zito’s been to everybody in the world including my son’s throwing coach who Zito still works with and they all take credit.

I’m not a big fan of the towel drill but I don’t see how it is going to damage the UCL unless you really go out of the way to hurt yourself.[/quote]towel drill i dont think helps


#15

I agree.

You’re more likely to hurt your UCL practicing if you’re trying to throw something heavy like a penny ball.


#16

Actually, most players will be more likely to hurt the UCL throwing a lighter ball such as a tennis ball, simply because they can get the arm moving faster as they transition from external to internal rotation and thereby put more load on the UCL. The heavier ball tends to slow the arm down and the dynamic load is less.

If a player has enough arm strength to throw the heavier ball just as fast or almost as fast as the lighter ball then the load on the UCL will be larger, otherwise the light ball is more dangerous.

Overload training tends to be less dangerous than underload training when it comes to throwing a baseball, although that takes into consideration more than the UCL. When the arm gets moving faster with the lighter ball the arm has to be decelerated from a higher velocity and the ball is gone so the ball weight has no impact at that point. Underload training tends to be more beneficial for most when it comes to gaining velocity. Risk / reward.

Probably the most risky thing to do, with no discernable added value relative to throwing an overweight ball, is to use one of those weighted gloves while throwing as the weight is still there during the deceleration phase.

The underweight issue is why people tend to worry about the towel drill but I can’t see anyone putting as much effort into the towel drill as they do into actually throwing a pitch and it becomes very difficult to achieve full external rotation without some weight in the hand. That’s why I say you’d have to be trying to hurt yourself to damage the UCL while doing the towel drill. There is probably some hyperextension danger while doing the towel drill if done too aggressively especially if the player tries to make the towel “pop”.