The importance of pulling your glove

ive been looking around for a long time on this website and pulling on your glove (which to me is one of the most important things in the delivery) isnt really talked about, almost really forgot about.

Because the majority of us don’t believe in pulling your glove. Swivel and stabilize is the way to go :baseballpitcher:

Here is what I had to say on the topic when critquing another poster’s mechanics:

It looks like you (like 99% of young pitchers) were probably coached to tuck the glove and you do this very aggresively. The problem with this is that when you focus on pulling the glove through that entire side of the body comes with and you wind up pulling off line or “flying open”.

Get into the power position with your glove out in front of your body. Now simply simulate your throwing motion at about %50 effort and instead of thinking “tuck the glove”, think “close the front elbow”. What I mean by that is instead of pulling the front elbow back, try swiveling that elbow down and in. The glove should rotate up and your elbow should be out in front of you. Continue to practice your throwing motion at about 50% until that feels comfortable. Now here’s the key; be sure that when you are throwing at peak effort with this new glove side action that you keep that aggresion that you display in your video. Snap that front elbow closed just as aggresively as you used to pull it back. This should also ensure that your scaps fire together. There is no sense in loading those scaps if you never fire them and closing that elbow should help facilitate that.

Here is what I had to say on the topic when critquing another poster’s mechanics:

It looks like you (like 99% of young pitchers) were probably coached to tuck the glove and you do this very aggresively. The problem with this is that when you focus on pulling the glove through that entire side of the body comes with and you wind up pulling off line or “flying open”.

Get into the power position with your glove out in front of your body. Now simply simulate your throwing motion at about %50 effort and instead of thinking “tuck the glove”, think “close the front elbow”. What I mean by that is instead of pulling the front elbow back, try swiveling that elbow down and in. The glove should rotate up and your elbow should be out in front of you. Continue to practice your throwing motion at about 50% until that feels comfortable. Now here’s the key; be sure that when you are throwing at peak effort with this new glove side action that you keep that aggresion that you display in your video. Snap that front elbow closed just as aggresively as you used to pull it back. This should also ensure that your scaps fire together. There is no sense in loading those scaps if you never fire them and closing that elbow should help facilitate that.[/quote]

i disagree. i have always been taught to tuck the glove and have never had trouble staying closed.
BTW Lincecum tucks his elbow and obviously doesn’t have problems

Absolutely false. If you look at him at release you will notice that the front elbow and glove are still in front of his body. If you know what too look for it is pretty clear that his elbow swivels down and in to the body. It does not pull back.

Please don’t use Lincecum as an example. He’s been in for 1 1/2 seasons. Yes, he’s a great pitcher, but he doesn’t have the longevity to prove that his mechanics aren’t harmful. He’s the last guy I’d want someone to imitate or emulate. That’s one guy you need to give some time to. We’ll know in a few years.

Absolutely false. If you look at him at release you will notice that the front elbow and glove are still in front of his body. If you know what too look for it is pretty clear that his elbow swivels down and in to the body. It does not pull back.[/quote]
i guess i don’t understand completely on the two differences. i do what lincecum does. and i don’t have trouble. to me it seems like he tucks his elbow, but i’ll need to see a vid of someone who you says tucks their elbow to see the difference. if you could get one up that would be nice. just to clarify.

When discussing this topic, we need to avoid using the word “tuck” as it is too vague. HasBeen described a motion whereby the elbow drops down and swings in front of the torso. That could be interpretted as a “tuck”. Pulling the glove back is also often interpretted as a “tuck”. But these are two entirely different things.

By the way, pulling the glove back is asking for trouble.

you can leave the glove out there as suggested, you can bring it into your armpit and chest area as your chest movs toward it (what i think is being refered to as tucked), you can let it move behind you as you throw like clemens, you can let it lower like santana (see his picture in the new sporting news preseason magazine (which is a sure sign the season and the swimsuit issue are just around the corner).

i don’t get real wrapped up in the glove arm unless you are trying to pull it back or slinging it to the point it is causing balance and direction issues. i think what happens with the back leg, torso, hips, and stride are much more important

It’s important to note the timing involved, however. At foot strike Clemens’ glove is still out front. His glove doesn’t really move behind him until after ball release.

Dusty’s not giving you a blank check to go get lazy with your glove. :no:

roger is exactly right. most of this happens after the ball is released.

Shouldn’t you be imposing a somewhat equal and opposite force between your glove side and throwing side? I am kinda confused on some of the posts that do not want an aggressive “tuck” of the glove. I can see how being over-aggressive can throw off your balance and timing, but don’t you need an aggressive tuck to power the shoulders around?

No, because in trying to power the shoulders around with the glove you can reduce the contribution of the core. You can get the shoulders rotating before the hips would pull them around.

While I’m not a fan of a lot of Tom House’s stuff, I do teach players to bring the chest to the glove.

Please don’t teach any kind of “pull”. The core rotates the shoulders. Pulling with the front shoulder causes pitchers to fly open and prevents the scaps from firing.

Proper overhead throwing principles remain consistent from sport to sport.

While pulling the glove back causes it to move the same direction you rotate your shoulders, it doesn’t exert force in a direction that helps your shoulders rotate in the direction you need them to rotate.

Furthermore, pulling the glove often leads to early shoulder rotation which, in turn, can lead to reduced velocity and health issues.

Nice post, Hasbeen!

Thanks. I love those pics. They are a part of a power point that I make my high school age kids sit through. I think it’s super important to help kids understand the body’s role in throwing. It better equips them to make in-game adjustments.

To be clear here. I can cerainly see what you are talking about with Lincecum. However, when he “tucks” his glove he just bends the elbow joint which is fine. I can assure you that when his shoulders begin to rotate, his elbow begins rotating down towards his body. Problems arise when we pull that elbow back.

For what it’s worth, if you have a video I would to see it and give you my opinion of your glove side. In some cases the “tuck the glove” teaching cue does ilicit the proper action. I just think it’s dangerous verbage to use with kids.

Something that I focus on when working on frontside mechanics is thinking about bringing your chest to your glove. It helps me remember to keep my front side stable during rotation. Also, I like what someone said earlier in this post about keeping the glove out front helping with scap loading. That is a big thing that will help with scap loading, also with thinking about bringing your chest to your glove it will help with getting extension on your pitches (extension as in trunk flexion).

yeah I agree I struggled with this for a long time and still do because its such a natural feeling to let your glove open and in turn open your shoulders… you should stop worrying about the glove and what to do with it and instead at foot plant keep the glove stable, dont move it… instead feel your body moving in a rotational downward motion into the glove. and as you release let the glove then do its thing… whatever that might be. Maintaining posture as long as possible and keeping balance is heavily impacted by what you do with your glove because of how it affects your shoulders… by keeping the glove stable and allowing your entire body to rotate to the glove at foot plant you’re motion will be that much more in sync