The importance of arm speed in sync with the lower half


#1

with guys like oswalt and lincecum generating such long, powerful strides the belief now is the longer the stride the better the mechanics, which isn’t necessarily true. In order to properly utilize a long stide - or stride for that matter- the arm must be in sync/time with the stride. When the stride foot plants, the arm should be vertically in the high cocked position. If you rush - it creates “arm drag”, and pitchers often miss up and in (towards their arm side) Guys like lincecum have very fast arm speed which work in sync/allow them to have strides longer than their body height. Arm speed is critical because - the greater the arm speed- the more you can generate and efficiently convert from the legs to the arm.


#2

[quote=“chew1109”]… powerful strides the belief now is the longer the stride the better the mechanics…[/quote]There aren’t too many who actually say this, not even Dick Mills, believe it or not. He believes it’s an indicator of the magnitude of momentum generated, which really is the point, maybe. We need to really watch out for too much “chunking” of mechanics into pieces and approach it in a holistic manner, which is kind of what you’re doing in this post, to your credit. Yes, the arm must be synched to the stride and foot plant. A long stride is not the goal and is the direct cause of pretty much nothing.

Having the forearm perfectly vertical at foot plant is something Chris O’Leary has focused on but this isn’t an absolute, as he claims. Actually, the high cocked position at foot plant actually very often involves the forearm being somewhat less than vertical. The best in the business often exhibit this.

Let’s be careful of absolutes and continue to think holistically about mechanics, as you do in your post. Good job.


#3

Should it?

In Humeral Torque in Professional Baseball Pitchers by Sabick et al., they disagree with you. The conclusion is that “…pitchers who elbows were more extended at stride foot contact tended to have lower peak humeral torques.”

This would indicate that a flexed elbow at foot strike causes greater humeral torques and increases the chances of humeral fracture (particularly spiral in nature).

However, Correlation of Throwing Mechanics With Elbow Valgus Load in Adult Baseball Pitchers by Aguinaldo/Chambers indicates that increased elbow flexion at ball release reduces elbow valgus torque. This is often (but not always) paired with contralateral trunk tilt, causing the higher “three-quarters” arm slot.

There’s a wealth of information out there that points to what correlates with specific injuries. I highly recommend reading both papers I pointed out. Note that I’m not necessarily disagree with your initial premise, but that you should check it out for yourself.


#4

I’d be more likely to turn that around and say the better the mechanics, the longer the stride.

My question would be when does the throwing arm go into external rotation and does that point coincide with foot plant or does it come after foot plant?


#5

[quote=“kyleb”]In Humeral Torque in Professional Baseball Pitchers by Sabick et al., they disagree with you. The conclusion is that “…pitchers who elbows were more extended at stride foot contact tended to have lower peak humeral torques.”

This would indicate that a flexed elbow at foot strike causes greater humeral torques and increases the chances of humeral fracture (particularly spiral in nature).[/quote]
Kyle, so is their point simply about amount of extension vs. flexion or about the timing of the transition between them?


#6

[quote=“Roger”][quote=“kyleb”]In Humeral Torque in Professional Baseball Pitchers by Sabick et al., they disagree with you. The conclusion is that “…pitchers who elbows were more extended at stride foot contact tended to have lower peak humeral torques.”

This would indicate that a flexed elbow at foot strike causes greater humeral torques and increases the chances of humeral fracture (particularly spiral in nature).[/quote]
Kyle, so is their point simply about amount of extension vs. flexion or about the timing of the transition between them?[/quote]

I believe it is simply about amount of extension/flexion in the elbow at foot contact. I don’t have the paper in front of me at the moment (I’m at work), but I will certainly review it later if you would like to discuss it.


#7

is there anyway you could post the entire article online?


#8

That would likely violate the copyright and publisher’s rights. You can probably access it for free at a local or school library if you ask for journal access.