The GOAL of lifting, sprinting, jumping, or anything else


#1

I have found that people spend a lot of time focusing on things that aren’t related to their goal. I assume that most people’s goal on here is to become the best player possible.

-Anything you do should be done with the intention of reaching that goal.
-There should be logic to whatever you do.
-It should be efficient. No one thing should dominate(except sports specific things like throwing)

The goal of workouts(lifitng, sprinting, etc.) is to:

  1. PREVENT injury.

Everything else(strength, muscles) are side effects.

Keeping that mindset will prevent the ever present risk of overtraining and overtaxing your body.

It has helped me a lot since I have had my knee scoped. Less can be more is that less is more efficient and done with a direct purpose.

Just some food for thought!


#2

Now is certainly the time to re-evaluate goals, so I thought I’d try to vitalize this thread. If jimster wouldn’t mind elaborating on his thoughts here…especially related to the above mentioned exercises, I’m sure we’d get some good information to comment on.

Jimster seems to work really hard at what he does, perhaps he could share with us how he establishes his new personal goals for his exercises. How does he ensure his goals are attainable? Does he set deadlines for the improvement, etc.?

For example, my son has always set repetition goals for his exercises based on his current personal best. Let’s say he can pound out 40 consecutive pushups, maybe his goal is to get to 45 by the end of the month or maybe he wants to see how many he can do before muscle failure.

He started 2 years ago being able to do 15 pull ups. He’s slowly added to that where he can do 23-25 of these before coming off the bar. He has added height and weight to his frame along the way, so he’s doing exceptionally well. At his High School, he challenged a Marine recruiter to a pull up contest and beat him!

He’s working on his vertical leap to the point where he can jump over the living room recliner taking a step and a hop and pulling both of his knees up to his chest.

He has a small notebook beside his nightstand where he records goals for various things then sets about to accomplish them and cross them off the list. He’s always challenging himself without me stepping in to push him.

I’ve always said there is no type of motivation better than self-motivation. If you have to rely upon external motivators then you just don’t put forth your best effort.

I’ve had coaches in my past tell other players, “I don’t want 105% when the chips are down. I want 100% all the time. If you can’t commit to that, then we are wasting each others time.” or “I’m putting forth my best effort to teach and train you. I deserve your best effort to learn and apply what I teach.”

Phrases like these have always stuck with me and I try to lead by example.


#3

[quote=“CoachPaul”]Now is certainly the time to re-evaluate goals, so I thought I’d try to vitalize this thread. If jimster wouldn’t mind elaborating on his thoughts here…especially related to the above mentioned exercises, I’m sure we’d get some good information to comment on.

Jimster seems to work really hard at what he does, perhaps he could share with us how he establishes his new personal goals for his exercises. How does he ensure his goals are attainable? Does he set deadlines for the improvement, etc.?

[/quote]

When I was on a more strict schedule on the the various teams I was on, I would set more specific dates and time frames to meet the goals I set. But now I can be much more flexible with when I want to attain those goals because of the nature of not being on any team now.

The big difference between then and now is that I can give my body rest when it needs it and push it when I can. There are less external factors effecting when I need to do things, so there is less pressure to overreach and stress my body out.

To get back to beginning of my post about the number one goal of working out in general, it comes back to how I look at working out now.

Yes, performance should be looked to be improved through training, but much of the improvement can be made through being able to train more. Having a body that is resistant to injury allows it to be stressed out more.

Doing band work is an example of this. A stronger shoulder muscle allows for more stress to be put on to it.

Conversely, if someone is focusing on just the gains, there is a better chance of overreaching and pushing past aches and pains that should be addressed.

I can’t speak for everyone, but having the mindset that if I don’t address the minor things when they happen, they will only get worse and then I’ll be worse overall.

A little time off now, saves a lot of time later.

Another note about goals, I think it’s important to have long term and short term goals. The goals don’t always have to be more pull-ups or more weight on squat. But they could be simply to do something without pain.

When I had tendinitis in more shoulder this summer, I took time off and when I got back to throwing, my goal was to throw with as little pain as possible. The same went for me knee. When I started to create goals around getting it healthy, and not specifically on building strength, my strength went up and my pain went away.

Being healthy and able to withstand stressors to the body will enable the body to be stressed out more. So you’ll able to lift, throw, spring, or whatever more.