The Freak's Pelvis

Tim’s pelvis still facing 3rd base after front foot opened and post leg internally rotated.

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A better look

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Zoom ahead to lower velo Tim

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The hips internally and externally rotate.
Your left foot points too your left shoulder and right foot to right shoulder (external rotation)
Your toes point directly towards each other (internal rotation)

How fast your pelvis rotates = velocity.

Timmy had his pelvis held back in the first two examples longer which created faster pelvis rotation that traveled up the lumbar spine into the thoracic and so on.

The third example shows an early pelvis rotation.

More to come

I have huge accuracy problems when using his type of styles

Plaz, it’s not surprising that you would have trouble simulating this pitcher’s movements.

Here’s the way I try and explain movement by any pitcher:
Try and write a sentence, any sentence. Say, write down - Mary had a little lamb… for example.
I know, I know it’s stupid – just do it. Then ask a couple of your buddies to do the same. When comparing the handwriting, are they all the same or different? They’re all different, of course.

And there in is the basic secret to professional coaching – looking at every individual as such, an individual. There is no way that you or anyone like you will start, pause, move, progress, release then stop as you do. Oh, when looking at two or more pitchers side by side in video, or even in real time, they may look absolutely identical, but they’re not – if you know where and what to look for. Little things separate each pitcher in sometimes subtle ways, that in total, make each of you unique.

How is this so important when receiving coaching and progressing yourself? There are what we call “triggers” that initiate each of the three basic stages of every pitcher’s progression as he pitches. Those three stages are the setup phase, the stride phase and the release/deceleration phase. These “triggers” are the body’s deliberate moves to setup the next phase, and so on, repeating until the end product.

Now pitcher’s like Lincecum take his phases to the extreme, and I use the word extreme only because of the comparison to other pitcher in the professional game. Possibly in the amateur game also, but I wouldn’t know about that.

Your body has natural tendencies that tell you things that go a long way with what you can and cannot do – at a certain point in your life. Listen and guide yourself accordingly. With professional coaching, you can enhance those assets to a certain level – but again, your body will only allow you to go so far. Not listening to your body’s sensing mechanisms will only result in pain and injuries. Recently I was watching a senior’s baseball game for men over 50. Let me tell you, somebody wasn’t home when the memo came out from the body saying– take it easy scooter I’m 50 years old, not 15!

Coach B., you have just said the same thing Lantz Wheeler was talking about on Baseball Think Tank! “My mechanics are not the same as your mechanics.” Right. No two pitchers will have the same mechanics. Each one is different. You could take a whole row of pitchers, and every one will do something different—and that’s how it should be; who wants a whole row of cookie-cutter pitchers? If you ever watched the Rockettes in a Radio City Music Hall spectacular, you’ll notice that even though they seem to perform their maneuvers and moves, their high kicks and so on alike, they do not—each one does it a bit differently. And so it is here. What Tim Lincecum does with his windup and delivery is perfectly fine for Tim Lincecum, but it wouldn’t suit someone like C.C. Sabathia or Justin Verlander. :baseballpitcher:

.

You know what … strictly for professional coaching reasons… I’m going to ask my Bride if I can’t go to Radio City Music Hall and watch the Rockettes and try and see if I can pick out those differences… yeah that’s it, those differences…

If I’m not back on the site within … oh … five or six months… I’ll probably be on the DL list … or … whenever the body cast comes off… whichever comes first… :eek: