The coach has a plan


#1

I’ve been around the game now for 40 years, and it seems that there are two camps. One camp designates who the starters are and puts together a rotation of sorts - at the youth level these have to be very flexible of course - and the other camp waits until game day to tell the kids who’s playing where.

Now I don’t have a problem with the latter for position players. Most of them understand who is the starter, who is the backup, and are typically prepared to play on short notice as that’s the nature of the beast. But I’m of the opinion that pitchers need to know when they’re scheduled to pitch in order to get their work in (bullpens, long toss, etc.) without over-taxing their arms. What do you folks think about this? Should a u14 coach make the players aware of who is starting the next game (or two), or should he play it close to the vest? And should I, as the father of a pitcher, be apprised of when my son is going to pitch, or should I just be pleasantly surprised come game day?

Another related issue is that when the kinfolk know what day the son/grandson/cousin whatever is pitching, they can make arrangements to come watch. Is this asking too much at this level?

Hose


#2

A “Good” coach, allows his players to prepare.
My son is inflicted with a coach who at the varsity level lets no one know who is pitching and all but ignores any consideration for, bullpen, working pitcher development, anything but the old “go out there and throw”. His total lack of parental consideration is breath taking. My wife and I determined that if in fact we’d allow our kid to go to 4 years of this sort of garbage, that we’d have to “transcend” the moron so he would have opportunity beyond High School, we’ve done it by having him work with a “real” pitching coach, maintaining good relations with several college programs in the area by participating with them in the clinics/camps they offer and of course facillitating successful performance by our son (The crappy coach, to his defense has commented to our son that he believes that he (our boy) is/will be the best pitcher the school ever produced). So Hose…It’s a crap shoot, just remember that you/your son are in charge of your own destiny, if you need to walk, get educated about what it takes and move forward with boldness and confidence, these years where your son is, are speeding up, you’ll blink and it’ll be his Sr. year looking at the future. Specifically in league/travel ball you are the customer so vote with your wallet.


#3

Totally agree, but that’s a high school/college/pro approach. I understand the challenges youth coaches deal with.

If it were my team, I’d let the kids/parents/etc., know ahead of time – and explain “why” I was doing it … to start to get kids to prepare mentally and physically for the game, to teach kids to get proper rest, to make sure they’re hydrated, well fed, and totally focused on their job.

But this is completely up to the coach.


#4

Thanks for the input. For all I know, the coach might be telling the kids when they are due to pitch, and my son just doesn’t relay the info. He is 14 years old after all lol

Before you say it, let me say that I do discuss these things with my son and his coach, but recently I’ve decided that I need to back off and let my son play the game for himself without my constant “coaching” - so this adds to my quandary. From a parent’s viewpoint, I would like to be able to tell the kinfolk when my son is pitching so they can make arrangements…I’ve never been “just” a parent before, always involved in the coaching, so this doesn’t come easy or naturally for me :wink: - but I don’t want to step on the coaches toes or limit his ability to work with my son since my kid has improved immeasurably under his coach’s tutelage.

So, bottom line is I’m trying to be a parent instead of a coach. It’s a difficult transition for me.

:wink:


#5

[quote=“hoseman18”]…I’ve never been “just” a parent before, always involved in the coaching, so this doesn’t come easy or naturally for me :wink: - but I don’t want to step on the coaches toes or limit his ability to work with my son since my kid has improved immeasurably under his coach’s tutelage.

So, bottom line is I’m trying to be a parent instead of a coach. It’s a difficult transition for me.

:wink:[/quote]

I feel for you hoseman…I will be in the same boat as you next season when he enters high school. I too have coached him since he was 7 so it will be difficult. Maybe you could try telling him that you miss being involved like you used to and would love to talk about his progress on occasion. He might surprise you!!! Good luck


#6

It’s very frustrating not knowing when your pitching.
I’m at the high school level, and we don’t find out until an hour before game time, and relievers find out, the inning before they’re coming in.

Our practices aren’t especially productive, so it’s extremely frustrating because you really can’t even do stuff on your own without knowing if your going to have to pitch or not in the next day or two.