Tendinitis: need help

Here are my mechanics. i am 15 years old, 5’9" 125 lbs. I’ve been having trouble with tendinitis in my elbow and have been looking for problems in my mechanics. This is just a towel drill but any help would be appreciated.(also if you know how to treat tendinitis, please tell me) Thanks alot

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Go see a Sports Doc and/or Physio Therapist

"Go see a Sports Doc and/or Physio Therapist"
Period.

Can’t tell mechs via towel drill.
Tendonitis is generally a result of lack of conditioning and or over use. Tell us about what you do and how you prepare. The amounts you pitch, what kind of rest you get. Gotta give us a bit more.

for a while i threw pretty much every day, then I stopped throwing once I hurt my elbow. I also condition on tuesday and thursdays. On pitching.com it said to throw as much as possible to build arm strength, so thats what I tried. The tendinitis has been in my elbow for two months now and ive seen a doctor, he said to rest and apply heat.

[quote=“joba62”]for a while i threw pretty much every day, then I stopped throwing once I hurt my elbow. I also condition on tuesday and thursdays. On pitching.com it said to throw as much as possible to build arm strength, so thats what I tried. The tendinitis has been in my elbow for two months now and ive seen a doctor, he said to rest and apply heat.[/quote]u should try to throw everday…throw not pitch…key wording…do 2 bullpens a week and throw in between thats what we do…run a lot too

[quote=“joba62”]On pitching.com it said to throw as much as possible to build arm strength, so thats what I tried.[/quote]I don’t recall Mills ever saying that. He does say to throw a lot but “as much as possible” is more than even he would recommend. Let me know where you read that.

Yes i guess i exagerated on that. He does say to throw a lot.

the only way i know to get over tendonitis is rest. if you are 15, that is the same age as my son and he got tendonitis in his rotator cuff this fall from overuse. we stopped throwing for 8 weeks, focused on aggressive strength and conditioning starting with the shoulder, abs and hips, then eased back into throwing very slowly.

tendonitis hurts but it will heal with rest and progressive throwing. you should also check for range of motion loss which would require stretching to restore normal range of motion. i would not try to throw through it.

Dusty, at what point did your son start up the strength and conditioning? During the 8 weeks of rest or after? If during, at what point during?

we started immediately. he told us to use pain as your guide. an aggressive stretching program, and if you can do the jobe workouts and shoulder/rotator cuff exercises without pain, do them. we started with 2 lb dumbells ans couldn’t make it through the 3 sets. now we are at 3 full sets with 5 lb dumbells and there is no longer a strength imbalance after 8 weeks.

we do core (shoulder/abs/hips) forearms and speed on mon/wed/fri
big muscles at the gym (legs/chest/back) on tues/thur/sat
will start the walter payton hill workout in jan on sat only (don beebie’s house of speed workout dvd)

you can do other stuff but we are advised not to do too much. this is the max we can do comfortably and hit/throw practice with the high school program

takes about 45 min. per night to complete.

even if you have had no injury, the shoulder/ab/hip work is a necessity. builds up the armor.

I guess I’m a little surprised you started immediately. What about that “rest” you mentioned? I can see stretching while resting but the weight training seems contradictory to resting.

we did not throw for 8 weeks and used light weight to make sure we stayed under the pain. the orthopedic had us start the rehab exercises immediately when we saw him and we saw him about 10 days after the injury. the physical therapist/trainer added a more intensive workout after 2 weeks and we’ve been fine ever since. i was kind of surprised too but it worked. we are pain free now and he says it feels stronger than it did. the follow uup diagnosis was biceps tendonitis and secondary mild rotator cuff strain.

the critical component to staying healthy is learning to listen to your arm and stopping when there is pain, and stopping when you reach fatigue levels. i think pushing and throwing beyond fatigue is the #1 damager of young arms. there is a clear difference between game situation pitching and throwing.

i think leo mazzone has the right program. throw daily between starts or appearances but focus on 70% most of the time.

Thanks for sharing your insights, Dusty.

Back on topic, when you stride it seems like you kinda of arc your leg towards the plate, rather than driving straight at it. If that makes sense.

what kind of arc are you talking about

The red represents the path of the stride foot when he starts driving towards the plate.

This slight “arc” as you call it is not necessarily a bad thing. Look at Maddux, Ryan, Rivera, Smoltz, Oswalt. Do they “arc” toward the plate?

if you arc in this manner, it should encourage rotational movement in the hips and trunk. i think it is a good thing.

much better than snakes.

[quote=“joba62”]Here are my mechanics. i am 15 years old, 5’9" 125 lbs. I’ve been having trouble with tendinitis in my elbow and have been looking for problems in my mechanics. This is just a towel drill but any help would be appreciated.(also if you know how to treat tendinitis, please tell me) Thanks alot
[/quote]

I don’t see anything obvious, which makes me wonder if the problem isn’t overuse.

How many months of the year do you play? Do you play travel/tournament ball? How many times per week do you pitch? Do you pitch multiple times in a weekend?

Which way does your ball move? To the glove side or arm side? Do you throw a slider or a cutter?

Also, just to rule out mechanical problems, were you taught to…

  1. Show the ball to CF/2B?
  2. Keep your fingers on top of the ball during your arm swing?