Teach Your Son To Throw, Just Not This Way!

I wanted to update you guys on a new post. I thought you might enjoy it!

GREAT article. I can’t even count the amount of times I have read an article that mentioned one part of throwing a baseball, then said it was the MOST important.

Nice stuff thinktank

This is exactly what Eddie Lopat was getting at many years ago. He said that every pitcher has a natural motion, that his arm slot is unique and individual for him, and this is where so many coaches slip up (and fall in the mud in the process). What he would do is take note of that arm action—arm slot—whatever one wants to call it—and work with that pitcher to help him/her make the most of it.
As has been mentioned various times, I was a natural, true, honest-to-gosh sidearmer, having discovered that fact when I was about eleven. I always threw that way. I wasn’t fast, but I could throw hard, and that took loads of pressure off the arm and shoulder, especially when I learned about, practiced, and made use of what I called “The Secret”—just how the Yankees’ Big Three were doing it. And when I discovered the crossfire—I just fell head-over-heels (or should it be the other way around?) in love with it. A little later on, when I met Mr. Lopat and started working with him, he helped me refine that delivery, and you should have heard the batters scream blue murder and the whole compendium of class-A felonies!
Thinktank hit it right on the nose when he talked about how not to coach. If Lopat were still with us he would have written THE book on just that subject—how not to coach, at whatever level of the game. In so many ways he was well ahead of everyone else in these matters of the mound—just ask those still-living members of the Cleveland Indians who had to face him. Ask me—I became a better pitcher than I had been before.
And now, to breakfast. 8) :slight_smile:

Great article. I’ve seen coaches tell their pitchers for years “Get to the power L”. Not realizing a lot has to do with how you get there.

Thanks fellas.

It’s an area that I think is a serious issue to the development of young pitcher, and pitchers in general. In pitching, Everything affects Everything. It’s never about one point or area, it’s how you get to that point.

The L drill is something I chose because everyone is familiar with the drill. However, I’m seeing other pitching guys that are making the deceleration drills, the new L drills.

The idea of everyone being told to do the same thing is ridiculous. As many of you know, I am an opponent of the "new age"thought on deceleration and the idea that the focus should be placed on the arm and pronation.

There is always a cause/effect relationship with every movement in the delivery. It’s never about where you get, it’s how you get there.

[quote=“Baseballthinktank.com”]
There is always a cause/effect relationship with every movement in the delivery. It’s never about where you get, it’s how you get there.[/quote]

Which is somewhat ironic, since baseball is replete with “results” guys.

Sure, a lot of pitchers young and old are talking about results—but how in heaven’s name do you get results? You don’t just sit there and wait for them to come to you, or absorb them like a sponge. You have to get out there and work at it. You have to start somewhere. You have to take a step, and then another step, and another, and put the pieces together as you go.
How else do you learn to throw a ball? By throwing the ball, that’s how. You play catch, and while doing so you have the opportunity to explore what can be done with the ball. In these early stages you don’t need a coach, just a catcher, a mitt, and a good arm, and you put those elements together. That was how guys like Bob Feller did it. The rest came later. Eddie Lopat had started out as a first baseman, and to hear him tell it he could field all right but he couldn’t throw to second—and then he met a manager who saw something in him and told him that with the right coaching he would become a very good pitcher. This was in the minors. The upshot was that he spent twelve years in the majors, four with the White Sox, 7 1/2 with the Yankees, then finishing up with the Orioles…And he worked at it.

[quote=“kylejamers”][quote=“Baseballthinktank.com”]
There is always a cause/effect relationship with every movement in the delivery. It’s never about where you get, it’s how you get there.[/quote]

Which is somewhat ironic, since baseball is replete with “results” guys.[/quote]

Good point…

Was just discussing this the other day. The "where you get"is what I’m referring to as positions in human movement. Not the goal or intent of the goal.

If you’re referring to “results” that’s different. What you will find with results and athletes is that they all get results a different way.

No, you were right - I meant, guys that look for 92+, a certain number of walks, time served, whatever their “marker” is. Baseball is full of “that” guy.

I think he is great for the game, just not great for kids trying to emulate him.

You gotta say the guy can really bring it, he is really exciting to watch!

Pathways!

 Pathways pave the road to results. I would love to hear stories of kids who look at the time spent perfecting that plus fastball and saying, "that's the path I'm taking".