Talk about work ethic


#1

Read this article -

Interesting point is -

Collins is still only about 165 pounds, but his fastball travels 92-95 miles an hour, about 10 more than in high school. He worked out with Cressey all winter from after breakfast until dinner every Monday through Saturday.

“If they were open Sunday,” Collins said, “I would be there too, but they’re not.”

Talk about driven - I struggle to spend an hour at the gym - he was there 6 days a week -

Where there is a will there is a way!


#2

[quote=“kidmullen”]Read this article -

Interesting point is -

Collins is still only about 165 pounds, but his fastball travels 92-95 miles an hour, about 10 more than in high school. He worked out with Cressey all winter from after breakfast until dinner every Monday through Saturday.

“If they were open Sunday,” Collins said, “I would be there too, but they’re not.”

Talk about driven - I struggle to spend an hour at the gym - he was there 6 days a week -

Where there is a will there is a way![/quote]

Collins is a hard worker and a tough guy. He’s going to find his way into the big leagues soon.


#3

As a guy who owns a baseball training facility (and is in it five times per week), let me tell you how hard it is to find people who are dedicated and want to work out on a regular basis. I have one guy who is 100% dedicated, and he’s a field athlete (shot put, discus). One college pitcher who is relatively dedicated, but not like the field athlete. And a 13 year old who is very dedicated but a little too young and skeletally immature to push too hard (though he throws pretty hard - 63-64 mph and he just turned 13).

All you want as a coach are people who show up and do the hard work. Turns out that it’s pretty rare. :frowning:


#4

[quote=“kyleb”]As a guy who owns a baseball training facility (and is in it five times per week), let me tell you how hard it is to find people who are dedicated and want to work out on a regular basis. I have one guy who is 100% dedicated, and he’s a field athlete (shot put, discus). One college pitcher who is relatively dedicated, but not like the field athlete. And a 13 year old who is very dedicated but a little too young and skeletally immature to push too hard (though he throws pretty hard - 63-64 mph and he just turned 13).

All you want as a coach are people who show up and do the hard work. Turns out that it’s pretty rare. :([/quote]
Sometimes I fear though that it is all too often neglected. In high school and here in college, I feel like I consistently work harder then the majority of the guys to develop where I am at, yet I don’t get any more attention that they do.


#5

[quote=“CSOleson”][quote=“kyleb”]As a guy who owns a baseball training facility (and is in it five times per week), let me tell you how hard it is to find people who are dedicated and want to work out on a regular basis. I have one guy who is 100% dedicated, and he’s a field athlete (shot put, discus). One college pitcher who is relatively dedicated, but not like the field athlete. And a 13 year old who is very dedicated but a little too young and skeletally immature to push too hard (though he throws pretty hard - 63-64 mph and he just turned 13).

All you want as a coach are people who show up and do the hard work. Turns out that it’s pretty rare. :([/quote]
Sometimes I fear though that it is all too often neglected. In high school and here in college, I feel like I consistently work harder then the majority of the guys to develop where I am at, yet I don’t get any more attention that they do.[/quote]

Sadly, this usually more true than false.

Work ethic isn’t about what you get from people who know you’re doing the work - it’s about putting in tons of work on your own in hopes that it pays off some day. And being okay with it if it doesn’t.

It’s that last part that gets most people.


#6

I like the part about gaining 10 mph over his high school velocity - he is now throwing in the low 90s. This shows that he had it inside of him - it just took some effort to get to it and get it out to where everyone else could see it.

As JD post - sometimes " you just have to believe something that isn’t true" - Old Lions


#7

I forget what the movie was—but I remember this one scene where the manager was chewing out his players for what he called “lollygagging”. He yelled at them for lollygagging their way down the first-base lilne—lollygagging their way around the infield—and he said, "Do you know what you are? You’re LOLLYGAGGERS!"
And there was the time, when Yogi Berra was learning how to catch and all, that one time at bat he did just that—he lollygagged down the first-base lline and was easily retired. When he got back to the dugout, Joe DiMaggio got after him. He asked if Yogi was feeling all right, and when Yogi said he was, DiMag snapped at him, “Then why the —didn’t you run out that hit?” Yogi probably felt like the kid caught in the cookie jar—but from then on he hustled all the way.
It’s really tough when a coach has to deal with players who are not exactly doing the work, to put it politely. He can tell them how to do something—he can show them how to do something—but he can’t do it for them. They have to get right down to brass tacks and do the hard work themselves if they are to get anywhere. It’s like driving a car, or cooking a gourmet meal—they have to do it.
I remember the day I asked Ed Lopat a question about the slider. His response was to take me aside and show me how to throw a good one; the rest was up to me, and I worked at it. Sure, I got the hang of it in about ten minutes, but I knew that this was not an easy pitch to master, and I worked at it for some eight months before I felt comfortable enough with it to use it in a game. The thing was, when I asked the question Lopat knew at once that I was serious, that I really wanted to know about that pitch, and that I was willing to work at it. As a result, we developed a wonderful pitching relationship that lasted for the rest of his tenure with the Yankees, and he had no reservations about teaching me some very advanced stuff he felt I needed to know—because I was willing to work at it and perfect it as best I knew how.
And that’s what “work ethic” is all about. :slight_smile: 8)


#8

work ethic comes down plain and simple to who is hungry and who is not

and the hunger goes from the ability to transfer the work from weightroom/throwing practice to real live preformance… if you preform excellance, everyone will know who you are sooner or later… collins is great example


#9

Why are there always comments like “only 165 lb”. Guess what, that’s pretty proportional healthy weight considering he’s only 5’8". Aroldis chapman is 185 and 6’4" and he throws 105, proportionally that’s even skinnier than this guy. Lincecum is probably 5’10" and he’s reported to be in 160-170 lb range. Total body weight has nothing to do with throwing fast, wiry (but strong) guys can throw just as well if not better than, fat/muscly guys.


#10

Very well put :slight_smile: The fat/muscly guys you stated just have more soft twitch muscle fiber that help them do more weight in the weight room. Although they can do more weight this doesn’t make them a better pitcher on the field vs the lighter/primarily fast twitch guys.


#11

When it comes to preparing for the game, I have little doubt that I leave anything “on the table”. If I may be so bold, I’d be willing to say I out-train 95% of the players I compete against. I have made the statement in these blogs before about my passion for the game and the strict discipline in which I eat & train. I WISH I knew someone in my area (like a Kyle B) who would take me under their wing and assist me in any facet of the game, whether it be training, daily nutritional intake values, etc. I am willing to readily concede that baseball is a game of failures. I am even willing to accept a bad outing or an off day. I am NOT, however…EVER going to lose because I was out-trained or failed to prepare. I am anxiously waiting to see if all this hard work translates to on the field successes and the expected increase in velocity I’m seeking this season. All the best in baseball to you guys as well!!


#12

:slight_smile:

Great attitude to have.

I posted this in the other forum, but I opened up training to anyone who is serious about training. No strict fees. You pay whatever you think the training is worth - I am truly making it available to low-income kids or kids who have unsupportive parents.

Let’s see what kind of response I get.

EDIT:

One of my clients badly sprained his ankle on Saturday. He won’t be able to play a position in the 2011 HS year because of it - but he hopes to pitch. On Sunday, he walked around on it with crutches in pain, hoping to stimulate osteoblasts to the foot and get blood flow to it.

On Monday, he called me and said he wanted to get in the cage to throw weighted balls, medicine balls, and take grounders from his knees. I met him in 30 minutes and we got a workout in, including an upper body workout.

That’s work ethic.

I’ve answered calls at 5:30 AM to go to the facility to throw batting practice. I’ve thrown long toss under the lights while it was pouring rain. I’ve stayed at the facility while my shot put athlete tried to power clean 205#, making 30 separate attempts to do so.

There is no way I am not going to support someone who wants to bust their ass in my gym. The problem is that there are very few kids in this rich area who want it that badly.


#13

[quote=“kyleb”]:slight_smile:

Great attitude to have.

I posted this in the other forum, but I opened up training to anyone who is serious about training. No strict fees. You pay whatever you think the training is worth - I am truly making it available to low-income kids or kids who have unsupportive parents.

Let’s see what kind of response I get.

EDIT:

One of my clients badly sprained his ankle on Saturday. He won’t be able to play a position in the 2011 HS year because of it - but he hopes to pitch. On Sunday, he walked around on it with crutches in pain, hoping to stimulate osteoblasts to the foot and get blood flow to it.

On Monday, he called me and said he wanted to get in the cage to throw weighted balls, medicine balls, and take grounders from his knees. I met him in 30 minutes and we got a workout in, including an upper body workout.

That’s work ethic.

I’ve answered calls at 5:30 AM to go to the facility to throw batting practice. I’ve thrown long toss under the lights while it was pouring rain. I’ve stayed at the facility while my shot put athlete tried to power clean 205#, making 30 separate attempts to do so.

There is no way I am not going to support someone who wants to bust their a** in my gym. The problem is that there are very few kids in this rich area who want it that badly.[/quote]
I wish I was close to you all as well. I think that it is a lot easier to be motivated when you are constantly around others who are as motivated as you. You push each other to the limits, pick one another up when you struggle. That is truly being a great teammate. It is surprising how even at the collegiate level you can see some of the motivation lacking from others.

It would have been nice to have people around that make things available to kids who couldn’t afford much. Sometimes it seems to cost an arm and a leg even just to get in a gym, let alone get training.


#14

Kyle, do you want to “find” some kids that would give their eye teeth for just the opportunity?
It’s a thing I found when umping…you see as part of the “dues” paying you have to go through, they “let” you ump in…shall we say…financially challenged areas (You just cannot believe some of the fields I’ve umped on)…well these kids don’t even have a clue you exist…they literally cannot conceive of someone actually wanting to “help” them (One middle school I very poignently remember had this woman as head coach…what a brilliant light in the darkness for those kids she was…tough, no nonsense…but “her love light shone” brother let me tell you… :smiley: ).
If you can’t find em…contact the umping association in your area, they’ll know where some kids who will work hard and appreciatively will be…you go get em…I 100% garuntee you won’t be sorry you did. Also…find where the migrant workers stay…they have kids that would also just die for a chance…don’t try to “convince” the rich…the ones who are worth the chemicals in their body are already moving on a path, the others are likely to sorry to matter…


#15

When Ed Lopat was being interviewed in depth by a baseball researcher back in 1988 he had something to say about this, and he was uncharacteristically blunt about it. He said, in so many words: “If you want to get better at what you’re doing you have to work at it. You can’t just sit there and wait for it to be handed to you on a platter.” He cited the case of Whitey Ford; Casey Stengel had asked Lopat to take him under his wing and teach him things, and at first Ford—a brash, cocky kid who thought he knew it all—was lollygagging and Lopat was about to give up on him. But then Lopat realized something—Whitey, underneath that brash exterior, was a scared kid who had never been under as much pressure as he was facing in the major leagues. So Steady Eddie altered his approach, and Ford realized that he was going to have to get to work on things; from then on he buckled down and learned and became a legendary ace. 8)


#16

Very motivational article…

I’m exactly 5’8 165 myself, and to see someone who is my stature have success and hope gives me the same hope. If he can do it, why can’t I?

I’m currently throwing 86-88 as a senior in high school. If he could gain a lot of velocity and end up in the low-mid 90s, why can’t I?

Of course, I’ll never know if I don’t put in the work.

Thanks for posting!


#17

Work ethic isn’t about what you get from people who know you’re doing the work - it’s about putting in tons of work on your own in hopes that it pays off some day. And being okay with it if it doesn’t.
It’s that last part that gets most people.[/quote]

Good point kyleb.
And like you said, even if the hard work doesn’t pay off,
you can have the personal satisfaction of knowing that you gave your best. And never, never give up.
You may not reach the Majors, but you will do what you can.


#18

Kyle B: What is your training based off? im from Texas si there anyway you could do it online as far as power workouts for pitchers?


#19

[quote=“kyleb”]:slight_smile:

Great attitude to have.

I posted this in the other forum, but I opened up training to anyone who is serious about training. No strict fees. You pay whatever you think the training is worth - I am truly making it available to low-income kids or kids who have unsupportive parents.

Let’s see what kind of response I get.
[/quote]

Your attitude, if it could somehow be transferred to other trainers/instructors, would turn the Travel Team/Training Facility social network arrogance upside down. What I observe is these training facilities, especially baseball training facilities, are for those who can pay top dollar for their kids to make the High School team, and all others are shown the “KEEP OUT” sign. For the parents who are unable to afford the $50/$60 per hour two to three day a week instruction, plus all of the added cost to be part of an exclusive travel team, they’re left on their own to instruct their child, and are viewed as an outcast. The Caste system is very much a part of American culture. Baseball training facilities are important in social arena, so they seem very aware about letting anyone in who isn’t part of the social/in group of parents. Most parents are turned off by the arrogance shown by these parents and their kids who esteem baseball facilities/travel teams and their prized little Johnny above everything else.

My 11U son will play several games this year with our local travel teams, but will not practice with any of them. And it’s simply economics and social standing. They’ll take him for tournaments, since who wouldn’t want an 11U kid who throws mid to upper 60s and hits in the middle of the lineup with power; but they make sure you know that practicing with the team is off-limits. The attitude is “No-Pay No-Gain.” Parents are paying big $$ for their little Johnny to play, and they don’t want some other kid rising up and taking little Johnnies place in the game, especially if the other kid doesn’t pay full wages. We play alongside these families in LL, and it can become tense. They’re hoping my son diminishes (i.e. no instruction/practice time with the team) while their son improves, so their son can be the noticed. Problem with this thinking is my son wants to work hard to be the best at what he does without feeling better than anyone else.

My son is fortunate to have a father who practices with him and instructs him to be disciplined in his exercises and stretching, but many kids are not that fortunate and are cast to the side of the road. I see them all the time. Talented kids, but without opportunity and direction. And the easiest way to stay on the outside is to give your time and instruction to these other kids to make them a better player and person.

Something I’ve learned during this past year is God has granted us so much, the least we can do is give to those in need. Keep up the good work. You’re on the right path. I love what you’re doing.


#20

We’re looking into this as a future possibility, but nothing in the immediate future will be available as an online product or service. Fortunately, we give away a lot of our content for free, so continue to check our blog for updates!