Swimming?


#1

A few pitchers on my team are saying that swimming makes their shoulders feel good, but I just cannot understand that. It seems illogical to think that using your shoulder more would make it feel better. After throwing, I run or bike to get rid of the lactic acid. But they are replacing that cardio with the swimming. Thoughts?


#2

Swimming and pitching don’t mix. Swimming is a joint loosening activity for the shoulder because to swim (some strokes more than others), the shoulder has to go through hyper-extension.

This comes from Tom House and the NPA.


#3

[quote]Swimming and pitching don’t mix[/quote].

For some reason…I think personal experience over years, I’ve always felt like this was the case. I’ve seen guys who usually threw complete games who were flat worn out by the 3rd or 4th inning or ended up sore armed after goofing around in a pool the day or night before a game. Obviously my observations aren’t scientific but way too many times over 4 decades to be coincidence, so it’s always been my policy to keep my pitchers away from the pool if I could…or at least get them to curtail activity while in the pool/lake/ocean/puddle.


#4

[quote=“Roger”]Swimming and pitching don’t mix. Swimming is a joint loosening activity for the shoulder because to swim (some strokes more than others), the shoulder has to go through hyper-extension.

This comes from Tom House and the NPA.[/quote]

Can you define hyperextension as it relates to the shoulder in swimming?


#5

I may have the term wrong - it might have been “hyper-flexion”. I’m currently at an NPA Coaches Certification and my ears have heard a lot in the last couple of days. Tomorrow is the last day. If I get a chance, I’ll ask for clarification.


#6

I may have the term wrong - it might have been “hyper-flexion”. I’m currently at an NPA Coaches Certification and my ears have heard a lot in the last couple of days. Tomorrow is the last day. If I get a chance, I’ll ask for clarification.[/quote]

Awesome. I’d love to hear anything you have on this topic. Thanks a lot, Roger.


#7

I personally think swimming ruined our pitching staff.

I have no scientific proof to back this up either but we swam real hardcore one semester and we dropped a few guys to shoulder injuries, including myself.

Could be a coincidence though.


#8

I’m not a big fan of swimming either, I guess maybe in moderation it may not be as bad but I prefer sprints, and jump roping after I pitch. I try to avoid most cardio but I like jump roping because it’s also good for footwork and you can do it almost anywhere.


#9

Ok, I asked House for another explanation and here is what he said…

Swimming forces the shoulder joint to be “hyper-mobile”. In terms of the stability/mobility chain, the shoulder joint is a mobile joint. Forcing the joint to go hyper-mobile can cause a loosening of the joint which is a serious problem for a pitcher.

The stability/mobility chain was identified by the Titleist Performance Institute (TPI). Yes, that’s the golf company. The NPA collaborates with TPI quite a bit.