Swimming as part of my workout regimen?

I’d love to get some feedback from you guys regarding swimming. How many of you incorporate pool time into your regular workout routines? I have access to an Olympic sized pool and want to know if I should start getting into the water.

I don’t do it myself, but it seems like a rather good idea actually. If you have access to an Olympic sized pool then why not? Builds strength… Nothing to lose.

I will readily concede I have ZERO knowledge as to how to intelligently work out in the pool. I have no grasp of # of laps, type of strokes, time in the water to start. I’m hoping someone can help fill in some of the blanks.

Yeah that I cant provide sorry. Give it a little and I’m sure someone will help you out.

I don’t have any specifics but swimming is a great isometric exercises and is really great for cardio.

What I like to do is swim almost ‘sprint’ laps, where you swim as quickly as you can from one side to another. Do it, rest for a minute, do it again, rest for a minute, etc. I am terrible at freestyle so I do breaststroke, and by the end of doing that for 30 minutes, I am worn out. It really helps with my scapula rotator area. The best part about swimming is it isn’t stressful on the arm at all.

swimming is in no way an isometric exercise (isometric contraction = no change in muscle length)

also, swimmers have shoulder problems all the time how can you say it isn’t stressful on the arm? (example: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/93213-overview)

what evidence is there that swimming is beneficial for pitchers? Why is the goal of a workout to be “worn out” at the end?

[quote=“LankyLefty”]swimming is in no way an isometric exercise (isometric contraction = no change in muscle length)

also, swimmers have shoulder problems all the time how can you say it isn’t stressful on the arm? (example: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/93213-overview)

what evidence is there that swimming is beneficial for pitchers? Why is the goal of a workout to be “worn out” at the end?[/quote]
Swimming is more of a conditioning exercise, and you are right, it is not isometric.

Also, swimming is shown to be one of the sports with the least amount of injuries, and people with injuries are typically over trained, swimming over 3k yards every other day, etc.

Swimming has both people for an against it, and I was just taught that swimming, if done properly and with proper form, isn’t typically stressful for the joint as a whole, though if over trained will cause tendinitis.

I have reservations about recommending swimming for pitchers or baseball players in general. In small doses it’s certainly not going to be a problem, but swimming long distances or sprinting laps can be detrimental to shoulder integrity.

It really depends on the stroke. I don’t think the breast stroke would be a problem. But other overhand strokes (butterfly, freestyle, backstroke) are generally considered joint loosening activities for the shoulder - not good for pitchers.

I guess it is bad for you and the longer you swim the more likely you are to have problems.

well thats enough info for me to rule out any swimming… I guess if I hit the pools it’ll be for some lower body work and general fun… as always fella’s, appreciate all the input