Supinating the arm through arm motion


#1

A guy from another team told me that I should keep my arm supinated through the arm motion.
I’m calling arm motion the motion that goes right after you get your arm to the “high-cocked position” and get it moving to release the ball.
He said to show the ball towards my ear when it’s passing my head.

What do you think? Should you do this? Should you bring your arm foward supinated? Or should you “show the ball to the target”?


#2

Depends on what pitch you’re throwing. If you’re throwing a curve then supinating the arm before it accelerates forward is correct. Supinating during forward acceleration followed by the change of direction into pronation after release is what injures arms.


#3

i agree with this as far as the fastball goes for the 3/4 arm slot at the least but not overhand. and i do not think that you should show the ball to your ear, to much twisting of the arm while you are in motion will probably lead to arm injury. once you get into the cocked postion, leave it there, do not make any radical adjustments in how your arm is twisted


#4

Sorry, but this is wrong.

What injures the UCL is supinating the forearm as the elbow is rapidly extending. This causes two problems. First, it puts a twisting load on the UCL. Second, it focuses the load on the UCL (rather than letting the load being taken up by the bony structure of the elbow or muscles like the Pronator Teres).


#5

Sorry, but this is wrong.

What injures the UCL is supinating the forearm as the elbow is rapidly extending. This causes two problems. First, it puts a twisting load on the UCL. Second, it focuses the load on the UCL (rather than letting the load being taken up by the bony structure of the elbow or muscles like the Pronator Teres).[/quote]

Chris, I think we’re saying the same thing. My “Supinating during forward acceleration” is the same as your “supinating the forearm as the elbow is rapidly extending”. There is a tremendous amount of force applied to the arm and adding in a twist while all that force is being applied is part of the problem. The other part is the rapid change of direction in rotation of the arm from a supinated position to the pronated position immediately after release.

As I said before, getting the arm into the supinated position BEFORE it starts forward removes the twisting forces DURING the forward acceleration and it eliminates the change in direction of rotation of the arm after release. All rotation is in the pronation direction - there’s just more rotation (180 degrees instead of 90 degrees as with a fastball).