Stride


#1

A lot of people tell me I stride very very far. Is there such thing as over striding ? So striding too far. Also when I stride I tend to move my lift leg to much to the right (im a righty.) So is there any way to fix that? Also would striding too much and to the right have anything to do with the elbow problems ive had ?


#2

If you are taking away from your hip rotation, then you are striding too far, but until then don’t change anything. And when you say landing to the right, do you mean throwing across your body? That could contribute to elbow problems, but generally it shows up more in the shoulder than anything. Video would help


#3

Ya throwing across my body. My landing football (lift leg) doesnt land in a straight line. It lands more to the right. My shoulder is just sore after games. But i used to have elbow problems and i went for therpy they just had me do workouts nothing mechanical. So im trying to figure out what wrong mechanicly, if theres i dont no.


#4

Tom House recommends a stride equal to your height. You may not achieve that right away, but your stride should be at least 80% of your height. Landing too closed will produce more stress on the shoulder and limit the number of effective pitches you can throw; however, landing open produces extreme stress on the elbow. When you land to the right, what position is your lead foot landing? If it is too closed (more than 45 degrees it will block off your hip rotation and cause you to pitch high and inside.

Soreness (not to be comfused with pain) in the shoulder muscles is normal after pitching to “muscle failure.” But it should not last longer than 2 maybe 3 days with proper rest and recovery training(R&R). If it does, then you need to see a doctor. Remember, you are doing a workout with a 5 oz. weight. Soreness or pain in the elbow is never normal.

How is your pitching? Are you throwing strikes consistently? How many pitches can you throw before you start lossing effectiveness? If you are pitching effectively then I wouldn’t open up my stride. Increasing the strength in your abs and hip muscles will help and you should be doing a light rotator cuff work out with elastic tubing the day after you pitch, but never the day before. This will help increase the strength of the muscles that control the RC and increase your stamina while reducing the stress on the RC and more importantly the labrum. Tear the labrum and your pitching career is most likely over. You should also be sprinting and jogging the day after and always drink a lot of water. Lactic acid is the by product when the body converts O2 and glucose to energy and it is this acid that creates the soreness in the muscles. The aerobic activity and water will help flush the lactic acid from the muscles and the water will help rebuild muscle tissue. Any work out tears down muscle tissue and the body needs time and proper nutrients to rebuild and the proteins that make up muscle tissue are made of carbon, nitrogen, and mostly water. So to recover properly and quickly and to get stronger as the season progresses instead of weaker, you need to eat right and drink a lot of water all the time pre-game and post game. If you are seroius about pitching then do not drink carbonated beverages the day before or after a game.

You can do 1 of 2 things: 1) Adjust your stride so you are not as closed, 2) Strengthen your abs and hip muscles


#5

There is such a thing as overstriding. However, I wouldn’t mess with you unless you were having problems.

I don’t think elbow problems are related to overstriding. Instead, they are more likely related to things like showing the ball to CF/2B.


#6

I’ve not heard House recommend a stride equal to one’s height. Instead, I’ve heard him recommend a stride that is as long as possible while still being able to maintain good posture and balance. I believe I did hear him state that pitchers ought to be able to achieve a stride that is 90% one their height but he doesn’t really recommend a hard number (or percentage).


#7

In Tom House’s book “The Art and Science of Pitching” he puts stride length at 90 to 105% of ht.

Some verification about the dragline.

If the toe of your posting leg is at the center point of the rubber and your delivery is solid, the dragline initially should be straight towards the center of home plate? or would there be a slight veer left or right depending what hand you throw with? And your arm angle? (Lower arm angle the more the line veers? or is the dragline ideallly the same regardless of arm angle?) And if all goes well, the foot comes up at release so the dragline ends, obvioulsy, and it should be straight?


#8

Boston,
Over striding and landing closed can both be major problems. Over striding can limit hip usage and add stress to the body. Landing closed will also limit the hips ability to fire and will put stress on the arm as you try to re-direct your momentum toward the plate. A lot of that stress is placed directly on the elbow. Lead the hip and stay over the rubber.


#9

I’ll have to check exactly what the book says tomorrow but he’s probably providing a target range. As I stated previously, I don’t think he recommends a single number. When House pitched, his stride was longer than his height. Nolan Ryan’s stride was also longer than his height. But House certainly doesn’t expect all pitchers to achieve similarly long strides. He is smart enough to know that pitchers are different and that’s why he says your stride should be as long as your functional strength and flexibility allow you to maintain good posture and balance. If you maintain good posture and balance, then that implies you are in a good position to get good hip rotation.

[quote]Some verification about the dragline.

If the toe of your posting leg is at the center point of the rubber and your delivery is solid, the dragline initially should be straight towards the center of home plate? or would there be a slight veer left or right depending what hand you throw with? And your arm angle? (Lower arm angle the more the line veers? or is the dragline ideallly the same regardless of arm angle?) And if all goes well, the foot comes up at release so the dragline ends, obvioulsy, and it should be straight?[/quote]
The direction of the drag line is an indication of the direction in which you direct energy. If you get everything going toward home plate, then your drag line will probably be pretty straight and pointed toward home plate. If you direct some energy to one side or the other, then your drag line may veer off to one side or the other. For example, if your head and shoulders veer off to your glove side, then your drag line might veer off to your throwing arm side. Ideally, you want to direct as much energy as possible toward the target. However, Tom House - at this point in time - is still studying and learning about the drag line and, therefore, does not make any recommendations to change it. The only recommendation he makes regarding the drag line is to position yourself on the rubber so that the drag line ends on the centerline from the rubber to home plate. This facilitates getting squared up to the target at release without inappropriate posture changes.

As for when the drag line ends, House will tell you that most of the best pitchers in the game keep their back foot on the ground until after the ball is released. The back foot staying down relates directly to the head and shoulders staying stacked into release.


#10

This sounds like a contradiction. Maybe I’m not understanding something?


#11

Thanks for the clarification on the drag line.

As for stride length. It’s on page 49 in my edition and to be more precise Tom House says approximately 90-105% of body ht.


#12

[quote=“kvoss”]Thanks for the clarification on the drag line.

As for stride length. It’s on page 49 in my edition and to be more precise Tom House says approximately 90-105% of body ht.[/quote]
Thanks for the reference.

Also take a look at page 22 - second sentence in that big paragraph at the bottom of the page. House says, “Optimizing the stride and momentum requires the highest leg lift and fastest forward movement a pitcher can initiate without adversely affecting balance and posture.” He says some similar things on page 23 in a couple of the bullets.

House also says these things in the documentation we receive when we go through his certification program. Of course, I realize most people don’t have access to that documentation.


#13

Roger,
Projecting the lead hip toward the plate straightens out direction. It also creates a “V” angle between the back thigh and oblique. The “V” shows that a pitcher’s weight is back. That is what I mean by stay over the rubber.


#14

Ok, got it. But I think it might be better to describe that from a posture perspective rather than by staying back over the rubber because “staying back” has ramifications on tempo and momentum. I’m assuming you weren’t trying to discourage those things.


#15

you’re 100% right about the posture part. leading the hip is all about promoting good posture. Staying over the rubber is equally as important as having a good tempo IMO.


#16

I read the other day somewhere that the weight should be over the back ankle. What do you think?


#17

[quote=“slbb5”]Staying over the rubber is equally as important as having a good tempo IMO.[/quote]I guess I’m not getting this straight in my mind. Can you elaborate on the timing issues around this cue of “staying over the rubber”? When and for how long do you do this?


#18

When? For how long? In general, I don’t care for “stay back” types of comments or cues. Getting the head and shoulders out front too soon is also a problem but I usually discuss that in terms of posture - not weight positioning.


#19

I share dm’s confusion. To me, staying over the rubber and having good tempo are incompatible.