stride

my son is 6-3 and 15,how long should his stride be?a coach told him he could gain speed with a longer stride

Got a clip of your son for us to see?

Speed doesn’t automatically come with a longer stride. But it does tend to come with those things that result in a longer stride. The point here is to focus on those things that result in a longer stride and just use stride length as an indicator of how well those other things are being performed.

Hopefully the coach told him more than that. There is a lot more to it than just a longer stride. If you can post video of your son.

This is a good summation. Some of those things that Roger is referring to is staying closed, accelerating down the mound, an aggressive back leg drive, and creating hip and shoulder separation. These are some of the tendencies of high velocity pitchers who will stride in excess of 90% of their height. Smaller guys like lincecum will be up to 125%.

I believe the stride length is a product of momentum and tempo, it should never be the focus, just a by-product.

[quote=“Baseballthinktank.com”]
I believe the stride length is a product of momentum and tempo, it should never be the focus, just a by-product.[/quote]

That is precisely what it is -

Well put guys.

[quote=“warriorsck”]my son is 6-3 and 15,how long should his stride be?a coach told him he could gain speed with a longer stride[/quote]This is something to be very careful with. The average MLB stride fluctuates and is based purely on the pitcher. There are pitchers like Lincecum who overstride and can handle it, and there are pitchers who stride under what most pitching coaches recommend.

The main thing to do is to analyze what your son’s mechanics look like, what kind of pitcher he is, and what kind of pitcher he wants to be. Typically, a heavy fastball movement pitcher will want to have a shorter stride, so he can get on top of the ball. Power pitchers will usually have a longer stride, however, this isn’t always the case, and the same for movement pitchers.

Take a video from the side, take a look and post it on the forums if you have the resources to do so.

Oh, by the way guys, I am Tanner Lorenz, back under a different name. A friend of mine told me to get back on here so I decided to. Looking forward to hearing for Steven, haven’t really talked to him in a while. First post back, hopefully lot’s to go.

Welcome back Tanner!

Looking forward to talking with you again.

Hey Tanner! Good to see you back on here.

What are you up to these days?

Well put guys. I agree, how you stride is a lot more important than how far you stride.

Stride length is a by-product and it all depends on the pitcher - height, size, flexibility, etc. It’s why pitchers like Justin Verlander and Cliff Lee have managed to do just fine thank you despite having relatively short strides.

One of the problems is that a lot of times kids just hear coaches tell them to get a longer stride but they never really show them how. I actually just wrote an article
http://betterpitching.com/does-a-short-stride-hurt-velocity/
on this subject if interested.

Nice site Phil

Hello everyone,

It has been a little while since I have posted as well. Wanted to say welcome back to Tanner as well.

I am actually planning to work a bit on my stride, I have realized that since I took a 2 year break from baseball that my stride is much different than what it use to be.

I use to have such a long stride that my back knee would scrape the mound. Wrecking my pants very quickly.

Standing pretty short at 5’9", or 5’10" on a good day.

Dan

Hopefully I will get a video up in a short period of time as well, to get some good conclusive feedback on my mechanics.

It is true that every pitcher is different, but I think that a stride that is less than 90% of the height of the pitcher proves to be to short of a stride. when I am giving a lesson and see a pitcher is passive and the trunk rotation is pre- mature the stride is almost always to short. This is due to many mistakes being made way before he strides. For example,

  1. Is off balance when coming to a gathering point.
  2. Hand separation is to early in comparison to his stride leg.
  3. Stride leg is opening up before he lands. Causing trunk rotation to start way to early.

And that’s just a few examples. I agree with Phil R. In when he said " how you stride is a lot more important than how far you stride" this very true but if you do all things correctly before and during your stride you will find that the length when done correctly is 90 to 100% of the pitchers height.

[quote=“Playersedge”]
I agree with Phil R. In when he said " how you stride is a lot more important than how far you stride" this very true but if you do all things correctly before and during your stride you will find that the length when done correctly is 90 to 100% of the pitchers height.[/quote]

All good points Playersedge, and I think we pretty much agree. I guess my main point is that you should really focus more on all of those other things, and the stride length will come. Too many times young pitchers just hear they need to get to 90-100% of their height and they wind up reaching out and opening early with their hips.

I actually did an analysis


for a kid recently that demonstrates this pretty well.