Stride too long


#1

I’ve got a real nice prospect on my varsity pitching staff who strides a little too long and isn’t able to get his head out over his front foot far enough (or his release out in front of his body) as a result. Any suggestions? Drills? Mechanical adjustments you’d make? I’m posting here, because I believe it’s a very helpful topic for everyone to share and discuss…


#2

hard to tell without video, but i was overstriding a little bit and just worked on getting the front foot down a little earlier to keep channeling the momentum from my back leg to front leg


#3

To me, a stride that is too long is the result of an earlier issue in the delivery. He’s probably falling to home plate with a stiff back leg rather than dropping before he drives. The weight comes forward too soon and he’s reaching with the front leg. If he sits down on his back leg before the weight comes forward, then it will hit the ground sooner, and the stride will be shorter.

just a guess, anyway!


#4

Steve, I have a lot of respect for you and now I have even more with asking for advice from the peanut gallery.

I know that my son has a big stride for his height and my feeling is that the closer to home you can get, the easier it is to locate and the faster the ball can get on the hitter. With that in mind, my son’s pitching coach has him work the bucket drill, here it is, he videoed this for someone else working on a different issue, but his coach uses it for being able to pull your weight fully off the rubber and onto the front foot. The night he recorded this he didn’t take a huge stride but sometimes he works him to get a really big stride and still get over the bucket. I like the idea of “Pulling” your weight over the front foot with your glove side.

If you would like to have him do it again with that in mind then I am sure he wont mind.


#5

the only problem i have with that drill is it would appear to be tough to integrate that movement into motion let alone into a sync’d delivery… i used to do it countless times but i still have a strange issue with my back foot coming off the ground…


#6

improper unsupervised towel drills made my stride to long.


#7

Stride too long, I really haven’t hear very much of pitchers having a stride that was too long?


#8

Postural instability and early shoulder rotation can prevent a pitcher from getting out over the front foot.


#9

I’m with Roger on this one, I think is to work him through some of the old “form” drills, he will see where he’s losing balance and self adjust. Slowing him down in the drills only. He’ll have to get his timing back in a sack but shouldn’t be too difficult. One good graphic way to demonstrate how inefficient it is to overstride is to mark his stride and then attempt to get him to throw statically from it, he’ll see his balance is whacked.


#10

Sorry for such a brief post. My point was that before shortening a pitcher’s stride, make sure there’s not some other problem that might be preventing him from taking advantage of that long stride. Posture issues will pull a pitcher offline from the target and prevent him from getting his center of gravity over the front foot. So will early shoulder rotation which, of course, can be caused by posture issues and glove issues. A lack of momentum will also contribute to not getting out over the front foot.

Now, if a pitcher is reaching with the front foot or lunging or using some other inappropriate technique then, of course, tell them to knock it off. But not to shorten the stride, rather to eliminate the bogus technique and replace it with a proper technique.