Stretched and weak scap and shoulder muscles


#1

Is this a common injury? I went to a physical therapist (Marty Stajduhar, ex-Ranger’s strength and conditioning coach as a matter of fact) after I started having minor elbow pains, and he pointed out that the scapular and shoulder muscles on my left side (LHP) are much weaker than on the right. If you look at my shoulder blades, the left one actually sits a bit lower than the right, and I can barely flex the large shoulder muscle above the collarbone (forget the name) on the left side.

He’s given me some exercises to try and strengthen those muscles, mostly tension exercies (pinching the shoulder blades, etc) which seem to be helping.

Anyways, I just wanted to check if anyone else had seen or had this, since I never had. Thanks for reading.

EDIT: I just realized this is in the wrong forum. Sorry. :oops:


#2

[quote=“jtreeder”]Is this a common injury? I went to a physical therapist (Marty Stajduhar, ex-Ranger’s strength and conditioning coach as a matter of fact) after I started having minor elbow pains, and he pointed out that the scapular and shoulder muscles on my left side (LHP) are much weaker than on the right. If you look at my shoulder blades, the left one actually sits a bit lower than the right, and I can barely flex the large shoulder muscle above the collarbone (forget the name) on the left side.

He’s given me some exercises to try and strengthen those muscles, mostly tension exercies (pinching the shoulder blades, etc) which seem to be helping.

Anyways, I just wanted to check if anyone else had seen or had this, since I never had. Thanks for reading.

EDIT: I just realized this is in the wrong forum. Sorry. :oops:[/quote]

jt, dont know if you have seen a sports ortho doc but I would. In very general non specific terms the scapula plays a very important role in pitching a baseball. In relation to the humerus the scapula must work in perfect unison in actions such as throwing a baseball [articulations/rotations of humerus]. All of the musculature that comprises your rotater cuff originate from the scapula. They than insert into the upper arm bone in various locations. Although its much more complex than this alone you can see how a perfect rythym between the two must be accomplished for the scapula and the humerus to work well together due to their connections to each other. Not to mention the actuall shoulder socket [glenoid]. How all these work plays an inherent role as to how the ball of your upper arm bone remains in contact with the glenoid during actions like throwing a baseball. Also, The word “proprioception” would be a good one for you to study. It is important that you understand what this is all about. Good luck!


#3

This is a very common problem. Those muscles are some of the most underworked muscles in the body and problems there can lead to other problems. Those muscles basically stabilize the shoulder blade and the shoulder blade is the base of the shoulder. So if your base isn’t stabilized, how can any of the joint be?


#4

Mike, I hate to ask this question but PLEASE respond! What is your position on “scap loading”? I also realize that the term scap loading may not be specifically correct in its application as to what actually occurs. We all know what the action is thought to do from beating the subject to death for the past several years. I guess what Im trying to say is please dont “get me” on the ideal technical description because I do think the majority knowWHAT we are talking about in terms of whats done. Thanks