Still Want Baseball in My Life


#1

I know this is a lot so I’ll say now my question is in the bottom paragraph fellas lol.

My name is Dan I’m a 19 year old righty. I recently after playing ball this summer am feeling a bit down. This was the final year I could play in the league I have been in since high school because of my age. I do have where I live 18 and up leagues and will more than likely play in that league. However, I feel like I have let some talent go to waste in myself. I have great knowledge of baseball I can talk baseball all day and as I have been told often am a true student of the game. I never pushed myself to work at becoming a great player I always played for fun and feel like I have let some raw talent go to waste.

Now my question is how would I go about being able to coach maybe in the future? I know my time is up to really be noticed and I also know what I have now isn’t good enough to get me noticed it would take a lot of time that I just don’t have to get myself to where I would need to be to play college or anything. But I would love to have baseball in my life still and I really think I could benefit kids in high school or something with my knowledge as an assistant coach or something.


#2

That’s the part " … I never pushed myself…", that’s gonna be the one thing to overcome. Unfortunately, characteristics overlap in this life and what was, can be, what will be. As time goes on, time is the one thing that we can’t buy back.

If you want to have this game in your life bad enough, you’ll find a way. You’ll let it be know in the circles that your frequent that you want to coach, be assistant, be a “gofer” … go for this and go for that. You’ll probably assist some real beauties, everything from total control-freaks to those that have absolutely nothing in common with the game.

You’ll first end up, … keeping your mouth shut, going with the flow, being the butt of jokes, blamed for just about anything that comes down the pike, and so on. It’ll test you metal, that’s for sure.

But, someday somebody will ask you … “ excuse me, would you be interested in being our head coach?” You’ll jump at the chance and you’ll then earn the richly deserved title of Skipper. Be patient.

You’ll then understand the key role in being a Head Coach by … keeping your mouth shut, going with the flow, being the butt of jokes, blamed for just about anything that comes down the pike, and so on. It’ll test you metal, that’s for sure.

So, use your imagination, your contacts, who-you-know, friends and relatives, folks at church, and so on. My best wishes for baseball in your future.

Coach B.


#3

[quote=“magicbumm328”]
Now my question is how would I go about being able to coach maybe in the future? I know my time is up to really be noticed and I also know what I have now isn’t good enough to get me noticed it would take a lot of time that I just don’t have to get myself to where I would need to be to play college or anything. But I would love to have baseball in my life still and I really think I could benefit kids in high school or something with my knowledge as an assistant coach or something.[/quote]

Did you play high school ball? If you did you could contact your high school coach and tell him you want to be the Freshmen or JV coach and there is a chance he will let you. Also there is a great thing about baseball… anyone can play! no matter the skill level or age, there is a league for you… you just need to find it! If your serious about baseball try to focus this offseason/winter on getting ready for baseball next season and then get out there and do your thing!


#4

I played baseball for more than two decades. Yes, I played for fun—but I took it seriously enough that I used major league strategies to win. I had hooked up at age fourteen with a very good team that might well have been called semipro if everyone had gotten paid; our manager was a former semipro infielder (second base) with good baseball savvy, and we played major league rules all the way, which pleased me very much. I also had an incredible pitching coach—an active major-league pitcher who was a key member of the Yankees’ Big Three rotation—who saw where I was coming from; he took me in hand, worked with me and helped me become a better pitcher than I had been. I had to stop playing when I was in my mid-thirties because my work schedule caught up with me and I lost my free weekends; now, at age 75, I have all those good memories of my playing days when I was a very good snake-jazzer with a murderous slider and a great knuckle-curve and the requisite control and command of these and other breaking pitches, and now I’m able to pass along what I learned and still remember after all those decades. So, yes, baseball is and always has been a key part of my life. :smiley:


#5

Its crazy though. I stopped pushing myself because I became so mental over things that literally once a season I would forget how to throw the ball and couldn’t even play catch with someone. But, this summer and fall I just have felt so care free for once in my life playing ball and I have played the best I have probably ever played. I am playing now in the fall and every game I have pitched the umpire has asked me where do I go or why am I not playing for the community college I attend. I have had a couple players on the team there tell me I should play as well and most of the team is guys I grew up playing against my entire life, I know I could play at a high level but I am focused on school and getting a 4 year degree and I am an A student and baseball has always been a part of that learning I do as well, but recently I have been thinking you know “what if” what if I do play and got even better. I have had the best season of my life this fall and am throwing the best I ever had. I don’t know what life has in store for me with baseball, but you all are right I dont see how I will ever let it completely out of my life no matter if I can coach or find ways to play or even just be able to pass my knowledge on to someone else.