Steven ellis--what was your velo durin high school

how hard did you throw your sophmore, junior, and senior years of high school. Im just curious as to what you and other pro pitchers threw for velo in high school.

also, what did you throw as a professional?

hs freshman – 76-78 mph
hs sophomore – 78-83 mph
hs junior – 84-88 mph
hs senior – 86-88 mph

college freshman – 87-89 mph
college sophomore – 90-91 mph
college junior – 93-95 mph
college senior – 89-93 mph (mechanics issues caused drop in velocity, fixed in pro ball)

1st year pro ball – 93 mph
2nd/3rd year pro ball – 94-96 mph

What happened? I mean why did you stop?

shoulder surgery. after rehabbing for all of 2003 at the Cubs complex in Mesa, Ariz., my velocity was back up to 92-93 mph, but my recovery following a pitching performance was two and three days. Waay too long, especially since I was a closer.

Instead of getting a second surgery to clean things out, I retired, got married, and started this forum :slight_smile:

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You just were content with three years?

Me, maybe it’s because I’m a little teen dreaming of the majors… I would just work as hard as I can to rehab and keep persisting.

Not insisting that you didn’t feel like working, it’s obviously you’re personal choice!

That must’ve been weird though, hanging it up for good? :cry:

BTW, did they pinpoint any reason for you’re shoulder problems?

(Watch, we finally find a vid of Steve and his mechs are more awkward than Darren Dreifort :lol: )

[quote=“Bakersdozen”]You just were content with three years?

Me, maybe it’s because I’m a little teen dreaming of the majors… I would just work as hard as I can to rehab and keep persisting.

Not insisting that you didn’t feel like working, it’s obviously you’re personal choice!

That must’ve been weird though, hanging it up for good? :cry:

BTW, did they pinpoint any reason for you’re shoulder problems?

(Watch, we finally find a vid of Steve and his mechs are more awkward than Darren Dreifort :lol: )[/quote]

Burnt out on the rehab, actually, and didn’t want to do another stint starting from scratch again.

Surgery was a result of overuse – closing out four or five games a week … week after week … by late 2002, my arm had had enough. And what was supposed to be a simple surgery that “just cleaned things up,” instead tightened the hell out of my arm so that I just wasn’t recovering right during my rehab appearances. It was taking FOREVER to recover after games despite the fact that my velocity was good.

So in the off-season between 2003 and 2004, about a week before I was to fly to Chicago for a second surgery, I called up the Director of Player Development for the Cubs and told him I was done.

No regrets, though. :smiley:

Did you play in A,AA,AAA?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steven_Ellis_(baseball)

Follow the links in the References section for everything you ever wanted to know about my career. Was on the AA roster during my rehab in 2003.

steve, physically were you a early or late bloomer in high school

Both, actually.

I was the No. 2 pitcher on the varsity team as a freshman in high school. Went 6-0 on a team that finished 3rd in the New York State High School Baseball tournament.

My junior year in high school, I moved from Upstate NY to St. Louis and led my high school team to a 2nd place finish in the Missouri State High School Baseball tournament.

I’s say I was an early and a late bloomer because although I threw very hard in high school, played varsity very young, and earned a full baseball scholarship to pitch at division 1 Bradley University in Peoria, Ill., I didn’t actually hit 90 mph consistently until my sophomore year in college.

Then …

Had a HUGE year my junior year in college and was drafted by the Oakland A’s. (Thanks to the workout program I did in the off-season that you’ll now find in TUFFCUFF
http://www.tuffcuff.com
, which is based in part of the Cubs workout and in part on a workout I learned at the International
performance Institute in Florida.)

Had a hiccup with my mechanics my senior year in college, but was still drafted by the Cubs.

Dominated my first two seasons of pro ball with 120 k’s in 80 innings, but then wore down … and the rest is mentioned in the posts above …

its too bad, the cubs could use a dominant closer in their big leagues now
:frowning: i hate being a cubs fan

Yeah, I actually heard a Cubs fan say that he’d recommend the Cubs to someone as much as he’d recommend a hard smack habit. :shock:

Hi Steve—I read through this whole thread and found it highly illuminating. Sorry you had to call it quits so early—I’ll bet that if they knew what they know now about fixing the arm problems you might have gone on for several more years, but those were good years, weren’t they? Thanks for sharing. 8)

Wait Steve, since you had to call it quits early i want to ask you 2 questions.

  1. Did you ever make it to the Bigs like passed AAA?
  2. Was it worth all the time and training you put into making a career but having it end early?

The first question could easily found out by doing a simple google search. Not sure about second answer because I’m not Steven. i would say yes its worth it. I would be happy just to be a professional ball player for one day because not many people can say that they were pro ball players.

I can answer that second question for him, and I guarantee it’s a resounding “yes”

  1. AA roster during 2003, while rehabbing.

  2. Of course it was. Having the opportunity to play pro ball has opened a ton of doors outside of baseball. Something all you guys will certainly appreciate once you get into the “real world” and start working :slight_smile:

An interesting note about Steve’s last sentence that the casual reader might just pass over without thinking deeper into it.

Steven posted, “… it opened a lot of doors…”

Steven Ellis is a prime example of hard work, focus, and being ready for opportunity when it’s there. I know for a fact, that men like Steven Ellis don’t sit and wait for the scouts to come - - knocking. He took the risks of being out there, getting things right and getting things wrong, sacrificing time and sometimes friends – just to grab his fair share of what he wanted out of life. And going pro wasn’t the start – nor – was it the finish. Like all men that grow and develop a skill or craft, he was persistent and kept things in perspective. His demeanor spoke volumes about not only himself, but his family, coaches, and above all his character.

I’m sure there isn’t a recruiter, scout, coaching and personal reference that didn’t say “I’m proud to know this man!”

So, when a door opened that had opportunity stamped on it – Steven Ellis had no problem saying …” whatever it is…. I’m ready… and I’ve been ready from day one.”

Coaches have a pride factor that gets them talking about players … and they like to talk often. It’s what we do. And on that note – It’s a small world, believe me, and it gets small every time your take a walk through it.

Coach B.