Staying back longer


#1

I’ve heard staying back longer helps with power. Is satying back longer striding out farther? What is it exactly?


#2

Staying back longer allows you to release all the energy at the same time with explosive hips and lots of power. Speed is power.


#3

To me, the term “staying back” is misunderstood. Many interpret it as keeping the whole body back while others (including me) interpret it to mean keeping the upper half back while the hips move out first (i.e. leading with the hips).

If you keep your whole body back, you’re going to be slower to the plate and will find it more difficult to create momentum and a long stride.


#4

[quote=“Roger”]To me, the term “staying back” is misunderstood. Many interpret it as keeping the whole body back while others (including me) interpret it to mean keeping the upper half back while the hips move out first (i.e. leading with the hips).

If you keep your whole body back, you’re going to be slower to the plate and will find it more difficult to create momentum and a long stride.[/quote]

Bingo.

Good luck to anyone in trying to throw hard with their whole body back over the rubber. Ain’t go happen.


#5

I have found that with most - not all, pitchers that “stay back” as a deliberate part of their delivery, do so because they are physically immature and weak in the pelvic and abdominal muscles of their body. These pitchers tend to bend excessively at the waist during this “holding back” posture and in reality, are compensating for the weaknesses that I just described.

Watch the youngest players in this sport and you’ll see what I mean.

Coach B.


#6

[quote=“Roger”]To me, the term “staying back” is misunderstood. Many interpret it as keeping the whole body back while others (including me) interpret it to mean keeping the upper half back while the hips move out first (i.e. leading with the hips).

If you keep your whole body back, you’re going to be slower to the plate and will find it more difficult to create momentum and a long stride.[/quote]

Exactly right.

In college, my pitching coach fell in love watching Josh Beckett. He would drive into us to “stay over the rubber” as long as we could like Beckett. What happened, however, is this slowed a lot of us down.

Stu


#7

[quote=“Roger”]To me, the term “staying back” is misunderstood. Many interpret it as keeping the whole body back while others (including me) interpret it to mean keeping the upper half back while the hips move out first (i.e. leading with the hips).

If you keep your whole body back, you’re going to be slower to the plate and will find it more difficult to create momentum and a long stride.[/quote]

Turns into whole body back - whole body forward. Prohibits seperation which is key in throwing and hitting.

Good way to explain it is to pull a rubber band back like you’re going to shoot it across the room. Well we all know how to do it right? For maximum results we create as much seperation as possible then as close to instantaneous release as possible.

Less seperation and/or delaying the release as the seperation decreases and you’re probably not going to have any complaints about being careful not to put someone’s eye out.


#8

As I see it, it’s not really a question of “staying back”—it’s more about getting the whole body into the action, using the legs, the hips and the torso in one continuous motion and releasing the ball at the last possible moment, which you will get if you work fast and don’t lollygag on the mound. I learned this many moons ago from watching the Yankees’ Big Three pitching rotation and seeing just how they did it. And working fast also has an added benefit of being easier on the catcher!
Watch someone like Mark Buehrle. He works fast. He throws strikes—or at least pitches that look like strikes. And when he’s on, he gets those outs. One could do worse than take a page out of his book. 8)


#9

I like working fast, but sometimes I start to think about that too much and then start working too fast and start missing too much. It’s a real balance with me.