Starting with toes at an angle and hands breaking early?

Should I be starting with my toes starting at an angle? And or one foot on the rubber and one off, or is it something to experiment with? My coach keeps telling me to start at an angle.

Also what are the advantages of breaking the hands early? I know that Taylor Buchholz and Jamie Moyer do it and they seem to be successful with it. But i tried it, just fooling around, and it kind of messed up my timing, but that’s probably because I never tried it before. Would it be a good idea to try or should I experiment with it and see if I am successful with it?

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Some coaches teach starting at an angle because it leads to minimal movement in the wind-up. My son was taught that way early on that’s the way he still pitches.

Regarding the hand break, you have a “style” that you’re comfortable with and helps you establish a rhythm. If you try to change it, it will feel awkward until you’re done it enough (1000 reps change a habit?). Unless you have a good reason to change the timing of your hand break, don’t mess with it.

[quote=“Roger”]Some coaches teach starting at an angle because it leads to minimal movement in the wind-up. My son was taught that way early on that’s the way he still pitches.

Regarding the hand break, you have a “style” that you’re comfortable with and helps you establish a rhythm. If you try to change it, it will feel awkward until you’re done it enough (1000 reps change a habit?). Unless you have a good reason to change the timing of your hand break, don’t mess with it.[/quote]

I was gonna try to break my hands early becuase all this year I have been changing my mechanics (i dont no why). Now I have been rushing latley, so i was thinking if I break my hands earlier then my arm won’t be lagging behind when pitching. So I have been going back to my old mechs and I am gonna develop them.

In regard to the toes at an angle, would it be a good idea to start with my left foot off the rubber (im a RHP)?

Figure out what is the most comfortable for you.

Note that the further forward your stride foot starts, the less of a “running start” you can use to get your body moving forward. Pitchers who step back and then forward sort of get that running start. (See clip of Nolan Ryan.) Pitchers who start like you’re describing have to resort to other means (weight shifts, internal pushing, etc.) to get moving forward.