Starting pitchers in season workout


#1

Hey guys I wanted you to take a look at this
http://bit.ly/aBJ779
and let me know what you think. It’s a general workout for in season starting pitchers. Can anyone share w/ me what they think about this or possibly tell me what you like to do/coach in between starts?


#2

Far too much long distance running. Our athletes do none unless it’s for metabolic non-baseball related purposes. And even then, it’s sparse. Eric Cressey and others echo this sentiment.


#3

What do you do instead of the long distance running? How much running do you do? How to you go about breaking up the lactic acid after a start?


#4

Lactic acid does not build up in the body. Lactate does. But either way, the idea that this substance causes muscle damage or soreness is a myth. We actually do not know for sure what causes delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), but we’re confident that eccentric phases of movements is what causes it.

Google “lactic acid myths” for many articles on this.

Our pitchers occasionally jog and do mobility exercises after throwing for improved blood flow to well-vascularized muscle tissues. Not because of some lactic acid myth.

Otherwise, they don’t do much running at all.


#5

Also, this workout advocates too much flat ground throwing and too little on the mound pitching. How can a pitcher work on the accuracy of his entire arsenal if he is not putting in time on the mound? This workout is suggesting to throw about 30 pitches at 75% intensity once per week? Good luck perfecting your control! How about throwing a full bullpen or two in between starts?


#6

[quote]Our pitchers occasionally jog and do mobility exercises after throwing for improved blood flow to well-vascularized muscle tissues. Not because of some lactic acid myth.

Otherwise, they don’t do much running at all.[/quote]

Kyle,

I agree about the lactate/ lactic acid issue- very misunderstood. I have read your sample workouts regarding power, strength, etc. However with your aversion to running how do you suggest an athlete develop the endurance compomnent necessary to pitch for extended periods?


#7

Baseball is a game not a game of endurance but multiple short burst of intense output. For endurance, try kettlebell swing (10 sets of 10 with 2-3 minute rest in between) or 10-15 100 yard dashes. Some people would want to cut the rest periods short but I prefer to allow near complete recovery so you can perform the exercise at 100% intensity.

Kettlerbell Swings (don’t do the flips at the end)

http://www.bing.com/videos/watch/video/24kg-kettlebell-swings-hardstyle/e229c2fb7782db551089e229c2fb7782db551089-179652723356?q=kettlebell%20swings&FROM=LKVR5&GT1=LKVR5&FORM=LKVR5


#8

[quote=“JP”][quote]Our pitchers occasionally jog and do mobility exercises after throwing for improved blood flow to well-vascularized muscle tissues. Not because of some lactic acid myth.

Otherwise, they don’t do much running at all.[/quote]

Kyle,

I agree about the lactate/ lactic acid issue- very misunderstood. I have read your sample workouts regarding power, strength, etc. However with your aversion to running how do you suggest an athlete develop the endurance compomnent necessary to pitch for extended periods?[/quote]

Endurance is specific to the task. Running long distances to engage the aerobic energy system poorly transfers to pitching. Short interval training over longer periods of time with frequent rest makes more sense. You don’t run across the plate often, you exert maximum effort for 1-2 seconds every 5-20 seconds.

So we do KB/DB swings, sled pushes, sprints, metabolic conditioning workouts, and so forth.