Standing Tall


#1

I just want to know what standing Tall really means and if it is a good thing or not. Please, if anyone can help me with this, I would really apprecitate it.[/b][/GVideo]


#2

At the start of your delivery, you just want to be comfortable, upright and relaxed. As you drop your leg following leg lift, there will of course be some contraction of the body as you start to aggressively and athletically stride toward the plate – but you don’t want to collapse on the back leg and lose power.


#3

Staying tall I believe means that you try and keep as much of your body height as possible all the way through you mechanics. The taller you stay, the more angle to the plate you get and therefore the more downward plane the pitch has and therefore harder to hit. The flatter the pitch the easier it is to make solid contact.


#4

Truth Buwhite. I have my son pitching more in a downward plane. Now most kids are grounding out. Flat fastballs get tracked then hammered.


#5

Higher release point/downward plane vs. lower release point/out front:

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/writers/tom_verducci/04/12/fastballs.trackman/index.html?xid=cnnbin&hpt=Sbin


#6

[quote=“Roger”]Higher release point/downward plane vs. lower release point/out front:

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/writers/tom_verducci/04/12/fastballs.trackman/index.html?xid=cnnbin&hpt=Sbin[/quote]
Roger,

What you are saying is that there is a tradeoff between throwing with a higher release point to achieve a harder-to-hit downward plane, and throwing with a lower but out-front and closer-to-the-plate release point to achieve a harder-to-hit higher effective velocity?

If so, which do you think should be taught to youth (9-12) pitchers? Or is this something that should be addressed when they are older?


#7

I definately think stride length can be addressed early, there are multiple benefits to throwing closer:

  1. shorter distance = less reaction time

  2. shorter distance = more accuracy since the ball doesn’t travel as much


#8

[quote=“south paw”][quote=“Roger”]Higher release point/downward plane vs. lower release point/out front:

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/writers/tom_verducci/04/12/fastballs.trackman/index.html?xid=cnnbin&hpt=Sbin[/quote]
Roger,

What you are saying is that there is a tradeoff between throwing with a higher release point to achieve a harder-to-hit downward plane, and throwing with a lower but out-front and closer-to-the-plate release point to achieve a harder-to-hit higher effective velocity?

If so, which do you think should be taught to youth (9-12) pitchers? Or is this something that should be addressed when they are older?[/quote]
Yes, I think there is a trade-off and, according to that video, they have shown the benefits of the out front release point outweigh the higher release point. Of course, the out front release point is what House and the NPA have been teaching for years. But you need to understand that the tradeoff isn’t so simple - there are other factors. Release point doesn’t just move up or down - it also moves forward or backward. This is because the hand moves in an arc around the shoulder. So, as the release point moves forward, it also moves down. And as it moves up, it also moves back.

One concern with trying to create a high release point is that pitchers often tilt their posture to the glove side. This tilting can lead to early shoulder rotation and that can lead to increased stress on the arm.

The video explains how a release point that’s out front results in a higher spin rate which increases movement. I’ve seen this myself with the pitchers I work with. But what they don’t explain is that by moving the release point closer to home plate, you also move the point at which the ball breaks closer to home plate. This creates later movement - a good thing.

Hopefully, you can start to see there are multiple benefits of an out front release point. The higher strikeout rates and lower opposing batting averages as documented in that video are the real meat of the matter. This is why I teach keeping the head upright, maintaining a stable posture into release, and letting the arm slot fall where it may.

One point of clarification…

The term “effective velocity” is used differently in that video than what is used by House, the NPA, and Perry Husband wo came up with the “effective velocity” concept. Specifically, they use it to refer to what the NPA calls “perceived velocity”. Percieved velocity is basically velocity taking into account distance from release point to home plate and its effect on batter reaction time. Effective velocity takes into account pitch location and it’s effect on batter reaction time.


#9

12 yr old 5 ft short squatty powerful legs that run in the family. he squats hard on his back leg. stride lenght exactly his height. throws 62 57 58 in a game. picthes all day 5.1 innings 9 strike outs great ball strike ratio. I think you pitch to your strength he doesnt have long arms hides the ball well strides well there is something behind this true speed and precieved speed. he just doesnt get hit hard often. can pitch 75 80 pitches doesnt seem to tire