Spring mechanics help

http://www.ubersense.com/video/view/nhhPxj6A

Here are my mechanics this spring, let me know if you guys see anywhere I can add velocity. Thanks!

So I can assume from the lack of replies that they’re perfect? 8)

I’d like to see a home and 2nd base side view for more detail.

I don’t think Ill have the opportunity to get front or back video soon, is there anything you can pick out from the side? Ill see if I can get front and back as soon as the chance arises, we’re under 6 inches of snow in Central Pa right now :x

I would like to see you in better fielding position when you finish the pitch. Just something that would be beneficial. Also, the reason I asked about the back/front is it would give better idea about if you drift one way or another. Personally I think you are doing pretty good. You have good separation, clean mechanics, and good drive.

Thanks, I have been working on drifting slightly to my glove side which leads me to land about six inches to the glove side of a straight line to home. I just can’t figure out why I can’t at least get consistently over the 80 mph hump.

How tall/weight? Strength numbers?

Im 6’1 150, what all strength numbers?

Back Squat?
Bench? (Though not necessary)
DL?
Clean (Though not necessary)

Also, 6’1" and 150 is very small. I’m 6’ and 195 lbs (very healthy). Gaining good lean mass is difficult but is also associated with increased velocity.
Eric Cressey has written several articles on it:

Yea, I’ve been trying to put weight on, it’s just extremely difficult for me. Back squat is generally around 170 I’d say, I don’t know about the deadlift though.

The goal for you should be to gain weight then, and gaining weight actually is quite simple. Eat a TON. Go to MyPlate Calorie Counter | livestrong and track your calories. Make sure to make an account and put yourself in caloric excess. You will gain weight.

While doing this you need to be lifting. That back squat number is very low, as strength increases, so will velocity. Same with healthy weight that you gain.

Don’t focus so much on the numbers, but on consistently getting stronger and trying to be better each session.

Goal 1 of working out is to prevent injury

Everything else is a side effect, strength, mass, etc.

So basically what I"m saying is that you should want to get stronger, but be smart about it because it is very easy to get hurt while lifting, especially if you try to jump up in weight.

From the side view, everything looks solid. If you get a chance to post front view, there are a number of things to look at relating to velocity gain and loss.

Strength in the lower half helps provide a stable base to throw from and in the stress areas of the arm is important to be strong to protect arm health. Core fitness again also important for torque and flexion and balance, etc.

I’m one of those weirdos who doesn’t think bulking up relates to velocity in a direct sense. It helps if you have more mass to generate inertia, I guess sort of like how a large boulder has more potential energy rolling down hill than a smaller boulder does. Whatever you add in mass, you must also be able to accelerate quickly with great finishing speed for it to benefit you at all.

I guess I’m more of an overall athletic conditioning believer than a pump-you-up guy. It seems, the faster you move, the less of your physical strength you can apply to the movement. I know Mills noted some study or other that supported that theory.

[quote=“CoachPaul”]From the side view, everything looks solid. If you get a chance to post front view, there are a number of things to look at relating to velocity gain and loss.

Strength in the lower half helps provide a stable base to throw from and in the stress areas of the arm is important to be strong to protect arm health. Core fitness again also important for torque and flexion and balance, etc.

I’m one of those weirdos who doesn’t think bulking up relates to velocity in a direct sense. It helps if you have more mass to generate inertia, I guess sort of like how a large boulder has more potential energy rolling down hill than a smaller boulder does. Whatever you add in mass, you must also be able to accelerate quickly with great finishing speed for it to benefit you at all.

I guess I’m more of an overall athletic conditioning believer than a pump-you-up guy. It seems, the faster you move, the less of your physical strength you can apply to the movement. I know Mills noted some study or other that supported that theory.[/quote]

What you’re talking about is what I like to call dynamic strength. Dynamic strength would be being able to do 30 straight pullups and static strength would be something like squatting 400lbs .

I don’t think anyone should be completely one or the other. But you are correct in saying that if you add weight it needs to move fast.

Maintaining body speed and intent while putting on lean muscle mass, I believe will increase velocity. But if you put on mass and it slows you down, it will have a none or negative effect.