Spike Curve

Does anyone know how to throw a “spike curveball”. Phil Hughes’ curve is sometimes referred to as a “spike curve” or a power curve as well as Josh Fields, the closer at the University of Georgia. Any help is greatly appreciated.

It sounds to me like the knuckle-curve Mike Mussina throws.
What you do is start with the standard curve-ball grip, but then you get your middle finger tucked back and dig your nail into the seam (an excellent incentive not to bite your nails). You throw it just like a fast ball, and that pitch comes in there looking like a fast ball but drops sharply as it gets to the plate. By whatever name you call it, it’s a dandy pitch. 8)

I’ve read about this pitch. From what I’ve heard you hold it like a 4 seam fastball but put your first knuckles of your index and middle fingers on the top seam and throw it like a fastball, it should kill most of the spin and the ball sould drop as it reaches the plate

both wrong
spike curve is another word for knuckle curve
a power curve is faster than a regular curve and less break

you hold it just like a regular curve
but you tuck your index finger
when you release you can pluck your finger for more movement

[/img]

here is one grip

It’s physically impossible to throw a pitch at 75-80 mph when you flick your finger out.

not really

but the finger flick is un necessary
its just gives you more break/spin

ask mussina and phil hughes about it being impossible

Its a great pitch expecially if you throw a knuckle also

Whats it have to do with the knuckleball at all?

Whats it have to do with the knuckleball at all?[/quote]
Yeah, its a misrepresentation in the name of it

[quote=“kelvinp”]not really

but the finger flick is un necessary
its just gives you more break/spin

ask mussina and phil hughes about it being impossible[/quote]

The finger flick does nothing to the ball. It’s just there to hold the ball in your hand. How does flicking the finger put more spin on the ball when it’s not even behind the ball. The fingers under and on the side of the ball at release. The ball simply rolls over the middle finger.

your index finger is automatically gonna flex out when you release
if bending the finger didnt do anything then why do it

i personally throw a knuckle/spike curve and i don’t throw it any different than i did when i threw a conventional curve…the grip just gave me tighter rotation and a later sharper break…i used to choke my old conventional cb, so the spike grip really improved my breaking ball and made it more consistent…to grip it, i just hold a conventional grip and then dig the nail of my index finer into the seam that forms the horseshoe…from there you just throw it like any other curve whether you think of it like karate chopping or throwing over a barrel…it’s definitely worth trying

but your index finger does flex out at release
it doesnt just stay bent

umm…i do know what you’re saying about the index finger, there is a feeling of that, but it’s not really an intentionall “flick” or “extension.” I just try to throw it like a normal curve and my index finger kinda extends automatically. it’s more a result of the grip rather than an intentional movement, in my experience with it.

[quote=“kelvinp”]your index finger is automatically gonna flex out when you release
if bending the finger didnt do anything then why do it[/quote]

I didn’t say it didn’t extend out. I wrote that the flicking/extending it does nothing to give it more spin. It gets extended by the same force that extends your elbow. The same force that “pulls” the ball out of your hand.

Bending the finger and placing it on the ball helps to hold the ball in place while your hand is rapidly accelerating. Try throwing a “beginner’s” curve where you keep the index finger extended and off the ball and see how hard it is to hold on to the ball.