Soreness


#1

Just a quick question, what is the best way to work out soreness in the arm?


#2

Sean,

Are you icing? Pitching can cause small muscle tears and inflammation in the arm which can cause soreness. Ice will help keep the inflammation down and begin the recovery process.

Also, are you running after you pitch? While there is debate as to whether you should do a long slow run or sprints after an outing, either one will increase blood flow throughout the body which will help deliver much needed nutrients to the affected arm to help the repair process. It’s a great way to “flush” the lactic acid from your system that has built up because of all the throwing.

These are just two ways you can consider, but it’s a good start in figuring out your body’s best solution to recovery.


#3

While doing those things should help, I suggest reading the 3 following articles before thinking lactic acid is a “bad” thing. :wink:

http://www.infosports.com/scorekeeper/images/lactic1.pdf
http://www.infosports.com/scorekeeper/images/lactic2.pdf
http://www.infosports.com/scorekeeper/images/lactic3.pdf


#4

scorekeeper,

Thanks for the links. All three are good reads and generally tell us that lactic acid is used as fuel and do not cause the soreness that is experienced after intense exercise (for our purposes, throwing). I guess the more appropriate way to state my case would have been to omit that sentence. Or, refer to icing and running as great ways to recover more quickly from DOMS (delayed-onset muscle soreness).

Thanks!


#5

[quote=“Full Windup”]scorekeeper,

Thanks for the links. All three are good reads and generally tell us that lactic acid is used as fuel and do not cause the soreness that is experienced after intense exercise (for our purposes, throwing). I guess the more appropriate way to state my case would have been to omit that sentence. Or, refer to icing and running as great ways to recover more quickly from DOMS (delayed-onset muscle soreness). [/quote]

I’m glad you took my post as it was intended, and not as being insulting in any way! For a long time, like so many others, I believed what I’d heard about lactic acid and soreness. Someone passed those articles on to me and I’m just doin’ the same thing. Its all in the spirit of helping each other get at the truth. :wink:


#6

[quote=“scorekeeper”]

I’m glad you took my post as it was intended, and not as being insulting in any way! [/quote]

Once again, thanks for the info. I did not join this forum to only give my thoughts and opinions, but to learn from others as well. So, I will continue to do my best to see discussions from all sides. The fact that you provided sources made it that much easier to see your point.

As for Sean, let us know if any of this information helps you in recovering from your arm soreness, as that was the initial question of this particular thread.


#7

Alright thank guys for the help, I think I have been just busy that way I couldnt get in my post throwing run.


#8

Are you running after you throw, gets the blood moving really well and promotes healing right away. :smiley:


#9

I know a lot of people advocate running and/or doing tubing exercises following a start or throwing 80-100 pitches to assist in the recovery process. I did it all throughout my career. But in pro ball and college, we’d just ice (if needed, or not if we didn’t) and hit the showers. The recovery work began the next day.

Do what you want … what works for one may not be best for someone else. But I just hit the showers and attacked it the next day with tubing, light throwing and a long run…


#10

By the way, Steven…that’s the tag line of the year!


#11

Thats what I was advised to do, run the next day after a start unless im in a back to back day tournament.


#12

What Steven and others suggested is good advice and that advice will serve you well.

One of the most important words in all of the above posting, is the word - RECOVERY.

Your pitching experience has a cycle to it - all designed to help you in managable segments. “Prep” work, can be thought of as physical conditioning, diet and nutrition, pre-game appearance/bullpen duty, and so forth. Then your actual “appearance”, involves inning per inning management - and your dugout sitting with keeping covered and warm, hydration, “walk-around/pre-inning stretch” just before you leave the dugout and take the field. Then your after appearance of taking care of your entire body - showers, rub downs, low impact drills, nutrition, etc.

So I would suggest that planning ahead of time to be well rested, nutrition, plenty of hydration, and in the kind of physical condition that warrants your day’s/night’s work load, will reduce much of your -RECOVERY experiences.

On the other hand, I will say this, I’ve seen the pitching surfaces that a lot of amateur pitchers have to deal with, and soreness has got to be a big time issue regardless of what “prep” plan is being used. The lack of care and attention to pitching surfaces - mounds and such, must be one of the most neglected aspects in amateur baseball. Soreness and discomfrot to arms, shoulders, lower back, legs, knees and so on HAS TO BE an experience across the board in amateur play, and at all levels.

Coach B.


#13

What I was told about running is to run a pole for every 10 pitches I had and do it right after the game…every game.