Sore Bicep

I have an 11 YO left handed son who is a pitcher. From what I read on this site and from what others tell me, my son has a fairly good mechanics. He has been very successful in his short pitching career of just about 3 years. I monitor his pitch count regularly and make sure he throws no more than 70/75 pitches a week. I do not include all the others throws during practice as he is an outfielder as well. Recently he has developed some minor bicep pain as he reaches or approaches his max pitch count for the week, never had this before. He ices afterwards and It last maybe a day or so and he generally has no problems afterwards until the next time he throws his pitch count. Is this normal muscle fatigue or is he throwing too much, not enough or what?

Pain in the bicep can be due to mechanical issues. But there are other issues to consider as well…

Has your son been playing year-round or has he shut down for a period of time each year? If the latter, for how long does he shut down?

Of those 70-75 pitches he throws each week, are they all thrown in a single game or split across more than one game each week? If the latter, how much rest does he get between games?

Does he throw breaking balls?

If you can post some video of your son pitching, we can look for mechanical issues.

He should probably take a week or two off to heel. Also ice a lot and stretch the arm regulary.

[quote=“Roger”]Pain in the bicep can be due to mechanical issues. But there are other issues to consider as well…

Has your son been playing year-round or has he shut down for a period of time each year? If the latter, for how long does he shut down?

Of those 70-75 pitches he throws each week, are they all thrown in a single game or split across more than one game each week? If the latter, how much rest does he get between games?

Does he throw breaking balls?

If you can post some video of your son pitching, we can look for mechanical issues.[/quote]

Roger thanks for the reply. He started throwing regularly in mid Feb. although he did long toss and batting practice just about year round twice a week. He last pitch at the end of Oct. and didn’t start the 70/75 pitches until Feb. He pitches in a controled indoor invironment and throws 70/75 pitches within a half hour workout. NO breaking balls what so ever, only 2 and 4 seam fastball and circle change. He has this work out every monday so he has some rest in between however he has regular practices as well. I try and inform the coach on Tuesdays to limit his outfield throws. By his next practice on thursday/friday he is feeling fine. The soreness only last about 12/24 hours and really dosen’t bother him too much, I just want to be on top of it and make sure its nothing major.

One thing i would like to mention is he takes batting practice often, at least 3 times a week not including what he does at practice. At these sessions he gets about 150 swings, he bats right handed and pitches left, I read somewhere that could be an issue as it works the same shoulder. Is that true?

I will try and take some video this weekend and post it up. Thanks in advance for all your help.

[quote=“twpbaseball”]
Roger thanks for the reply. He started throwing regularly in mid Feb. although he did long toss and batting practice just about year round twice a week. He last pitch at the end of Oct. and didn’t start the 70/75 pitches until Feb. He pitches in a controled indoor invironment and throws 70/75 pitches within a half hour workout.[/quote]
70-75 pitches in a half-hour bullpen setting is, I think, a bit much. Think about it. 70-75 pitches might be what he throws over the course of a game. But, most likely, that game takes a couple hours and he gets to rest every other half-inning while his team bats. FWIW, Tom House recommends bullpens of about 40-45 pitches.

If I’m reading this right, your son throws a bullpen on Monday and then has regular practices on Tuesday and Thursday. You mentioned limiting outfield throws in the Tuesday practices - can I assume he does no pitching in the Tuesday practices? If not, then that’s an obvious problem.

My understanding is that swinging a bat is a joint loosening activity for the front shoulder as the follow-through opens up the front side of the shoulder. So, yes, players who pitch left or right handed and bat right or left handed are at greater risk for injury than those who pitch and bat with the same “handedness”. But the concern here would be the shoulder and your son is having pain in the bicep. I guess I should ask where in the bicep the pain is located.

Sounds good.

One thing I would like to mention is that of periodization which is basically shutting down for a period of time. The American Sport Medicine Institute (ASMI) has issued recommendations on this. Go
http://www.asmi.org/asmiweb/youthpitchcounts.htm][b]here[/b
and click on the link for “2006 USA Baseball Guidelines”. Some folks say that pitchers should shut down their pitching for a certain period each year but that they should continue throwing. The ASMI, however, recommends no throwing at all. I think the difference has to do with age. I feel that year round throwing (throwing - not pitching!) may be ok for older kids but not for young kids. Too often people make blanket claims or recommendations without qualifying them appropriately.

There is also a link there for “2007 ASMI Presentation to Little League”. Click on that link and then on the link for Section 3 which is a presentation by Dr. James Andrews. The presentation is very informative and I highly recommend watching it.

What i should of said for clarification is he throws 70/75 throws which include all warm-up and pick off practice all withing that 1/2 hour session.

You are correct, no pitching at all on Tuesday, occasional 25 pitches on Thursday but thats it until Monday again. Now that the season has started I will have to develop a whole new schedule.

The mild pain starts at his bicep and goes across his arm to his tricep.

Thanks for the links and stay tuned for a video this weekend.

What I meant was at which end of the bicep does the pain occur? In other words, near the elbow or the shoulder?

He tells me when he gets the pain it is more towards his tricep

Again in slow motion

from the front view he seems to be striding open which can put more stress on the arm.

i know when i strided (strode? lol) open it caused a lot of pain in bicep/tricep area

so fixing the stride could be of some help in relieving the pain

[quote=“OffSet”]from the front view he seems to be striding open which can put more stress on the arm.

i know when i strided (strode? lol) open it caused a lot of pain in bicep/tricep area

so fixing the stride could be of some help in relieving the pain[/quote]

yeah…
it looks like his arm is playing catchup to his pecs, rather than the ][’;lmovement being a lil more harmoneus towards the plate.

this could def cause a lil whiplash effect on the Brach, def a lil tear maybe.

I actually worked with a physician for a league who recomneded an extended rehab time after pain in the elbow/tricep.
this is the same group that benched under 14 kids if they tried a curve in the game.

Thanks guys, it does appears that he may be slightly open, I was taking that video from an angle but I’ll be sure to check that out. What I noticed was the length of his stride appears that it could be increased. If you look from the side view his knee does not appear to bend as much as some of the clips I seen on here. Not that it is causing the mild pain just an over all mechanics thing. What do you guys think?

his legs probably wont be strong enough to use to their full potential

the leg incorporation will come with age and strength

I’m not sure on the bicep pain from your desciptions. I get the impression the pain is not precisely located but radiates over a large area. All I can recommend is to see a doctor.

As for the mechanics shown in the video, I’d recommend moving him to right (so that his drag line ends on the centerline of the rubber) and getting him to move his hips forward faster - getting his center of mass moving faster should lengthen his stride and create more energy to transfer up through the body.

He also starts to turn his glove arm over too early (and that can lead to early shoulder rotation) but getting to move forward faster may fix this issue so I’d play “wait and see” on this one.

Finally, I’d recommend getting him to keep his head upright through release. If you can stop the video right around release point, you’ll see the posture issue.

Thanks Roger, I undestand what your saying and will have him try those things.

The one question I have is he has always been taught as a lefty to stay on the left side of the mound as to hide the ball from the batter better. Are you saying he should be more centered?

Yes, I am saying he should be more centered. (By centered, I mean his drag line ends on the centerline of the rubber.) By doing so, he will avoid certain postural issues at release.

The old “lefties on the left, righties on the right” teach is, to me, one of those old hand-me-down teaches that sounds good but can actually cause issues. Coaches often teach that because it creates “angle” which supposedly makes things more difficult for batters. I suppose it might hide the ball a little better too. But the issue it creates is one of posture. When you throw a ball hard at a target, your shoulders want to square up to that target. But when you’re off-center, your body tries to get back inline with the target and often it tries to do so by altering posture late in the delivery. Such late posture changes will pull the release point back and raise it up and generally make it inconsistent. Posture issues can also put more stress on the arm.

Gotcha, thanks.

My coaches are always telling me to get back on the left side of the rubber(looking from mound towards home…) and im a righty… and i always want to be center… should I continue to do what i do or listen to my coach?

Greg

[quote=“Greg516”]My coaches are always telling me to get back on the left side of the rubber(looking from mound towards home…) and im a righty… and i always want to be center… should I continue to do what i do or listen to my coach?

Greg[/quote]
If you want to play, you better do what your coach tells you. Or, at least make it look like you’re doing what he says. Maybe he sees something in your mechanics that you are unaware of - like a posture issue. Hopefully he has a good reason for moving you to the left side of the rubber instead of just applying some cookie cutter tactic.

Regarding “being centered”, my comments above were specific to the pitcher shown in the video. That pitcher appeared to have a back foot drag line that extended straight forward. The goal is to get the drag line to end on the centerline of the rubber so, for that pitcher, he should be approximately centered. But, for you, I can’t automatically make the same recommendation. I’d need to see video of you and see what your drag line looks like.

I thought bicep soreness is supposed to just be natural soreness?