Son's pitching mechanics ... where to focus attention?

Hi,

Got lots of great feedback this past Fall. My son is able to get a few minutes of pitching practice each week this Winter (up North here).

Here’s where he’s at. Not sure if he’s progressing … so hard for me to tell.

I see his glove hand isn’t tucking the way it should be - I was thinking of suggesting he tuck it higher up by his chest so he doesn’t lose track of where it is. I’m wondering what I should recommend he work on.

Video this Winter …

Video back in the Fall …

Yeah he could tuck the glove, I’m not sure how important it is to make sure he has perfect mechanics, but at least ones that will make sure he doesn’t get hurt.

I’d be hard for me to say what to learn at that age, better off with some of the dad’s here and what they think.

Well you can definetly tell he has progressed. In the fall video he doesn’t have side movement towards the plate almost at all. In the recent video you can see he’s gaining momentum by starting butt-first movement to the plate after the leg rise. Very nice.
And his arm action doesn’t look so violent anymore which I think is a sign that the arm movement is safer for the arm too…

About what to work on I’d say hip/shoulder separation. But well, it’s maybe too early to get focused on that at that age, but anyway…
He seems to rotate his hips and shoulders almost at the same time, which prevents him from efficiently transferring the momentum he is gaining with his lower body to the arm and all the way to the wrist.

What you’d want is to keep the shoulders closed as long as possible while the hips do the rotation. So basically now his shoulders are starting to rotate too early. Try making him keep them sideways to the plate a little bit longer.

I agree - noticeable improvement. Good momenum. My only suggestions are to have him stabilize his glove in front of his chest instead of letting it drop. I’d also want to see him keep his eyes level but I’d wait to see if that happens on its own as a byproduct of stabilizing the glove.

Your kid looks like a stud. Good proggress thru the fall. Id say the main focus should be to keep baseball fun and staying healthy. Play a game i used to call world series. Have him pretend hes in the bottom of the 9th in the world series playing against your favorite teams rival and he has to throw strikes in order to strike the side out. Try not to throw any balls. I still love that game lol :baseballpitcher:

This young man looks very good and I agree with the rest here in saying that there has been some good progress made. I very much like how he’s leading with his hip earlier and staying closed well. Compare this pitcher to the one on the mound behind him. That boy opens up immediately and then, of course, has to throw “all arm”. Not the case with the pitcher in question. The arm action is more fluid here. No real pauses. I like what I see.

Now, one spot I suggest for, I think, big improvement is his back leg/hip action. In the video from the fall, you’ll notice how his back leg kind of flips out to the side after he throws. This, to me, indicates incomplete hip rotation because of the back leg being a hindrance to it.

The current video is a vast improvement on that but still has some more room for getting better. My suggestion is for him to make sure that the back leg/knee/foot spin so that the knee is facing more downward when done. The foot needs to be turned over completely onto its laces. The hip has completed its rotation. Please note that this does NOT mean that he should pull the back knee forward and inward, as has been a teaching cue by many coaches in the past. It’s more of a “spinning” action of the entire assembly, from the hip down to include the knee and back foot.

This just might allow his shoulder rotation to be fuller, or less hindered, by the back side. His follow through may become less truncated as well.

[quote=". a n t o n i o . ."]About what to work on I’d say hip/shoulder separation. But well, it’s maybe too early to get focused on that at that age, but anyway…
He seems to rotate his hips and shoulders almost at the same time, which prevents him from efficiently transferring the momentum he is gaining with his lower body to the arm and all the way to the wrist.[/quote]

This is normal for this age. He’ll grow out of it.

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”][quote=". a n t o n i o . ."]About what to work on I’d say hip/shoulder separation. But well, it’s maybe too early to get focused on that at that age, but anyway…
He seems to rotate his hips and shoulders almost at the same time, which prevents him from efficiently transferring the momentum he is gaining with his lower body to the arm and all the way to the wrist.[/quote]

This is normal for this age. He’ll grow out of it.[/quote]

Agreed. This is simply an immature motor pattern borne out by the fact that biologically young athletes don’t have the functional strength or stability to separate the hips from the shoulders.

Sooner or later he’ll figure it out.

I’m very jealous of your indoor workout facility, BTW. :slight_smile:

Chris and Kyleb
May I suggest that he simply focus on keeping the shoulders closed until landing? Hip/shoulder separation will take care of itself to the extent that his functional strength will allow. Just don’t focus on it right now.

[quote=“dm59”]Chris and Kyleb
May I suggest that he simply focus on keeping the shoulders closed until landing? Hip/shoulder separation will take care of itself to the extent that his functional strength will allow. Just don’t focus on it right now.[/quote]
:allgood:
Better glove-side stabilization should allow him to stay closed longer.

That’s a lot of food for thought. Thanks to everyone for replying. This site is fantastic … we can’t get this kind of pitching advice around where I live.

Now, I’m trying to get my son to establish the glove side control up by his chest - initially we’d tried to closer around his hip - but I’ve noticed that he tends to be careless with it down there.

He’s trying today to keep the shoulder closed (and the hip & shoulder separation). But I find it’s slowing his wind up - maybe this will disappear after he gets comfortable with keeping the shoulder closed??? Is this typical and/or okay if it slows his wind up?

Craig
PS - baseball doesn’t get much attention around here - but we do have some cool domes where some people run baseball camps indoors during the winter.

Focusing on any one particular part of the delivery will often cause the whole to suffer. It’s all part of the learning process.

How old is your son?

Make sure you son his keeping his head even with his body. Because if he pulls his head off to one side that is going to cause him to open up. The body will follow where the head goes. Try walking in a straight line with your head tilted to one side, it wont work as you will begin to walk in that direction. Its the same philosophy for pitching.

He turned 10 at the end of October. Last Summer was his first year pitching.