So many supplements... What do I do?!?!?!?


#1

OK, I was reading the thread about supplements and I have a lot of questions about supplements and stuff. Below is a list of things that I have gathered so far from reading different sources on this topic…“I don’t know whats right and whats wrong.”

  1. Do not take any, of any kind of supplements.

  2. Take juice plus and just eat all natural without any extra supplements.

  3. Take juice plus, eat all natural and take natural protein powder.

  4. Mix up a hole bunch of stuff that I don’t know how to pronounce and take it.

The questions below are basicly what I already asked in a slightly different format.

Should I be taking supplements?

If I should take supplements, which ones?

What are the best supplement?

If I should only take natural supplements, what are the best all natural supplements?

Due to some problems, I will not be playing school ball and can not start working out again until about a month from now. When I start working out again I will be doing isometric leg stuff, lots of rotational core stuff and Setpro. I really just want to know what I can do to TOTALLY maximize my workouts. I would really appreciate input from as many people as possible, especially Ibarber4, Centerfielde2150, KC86, and anyone else that knows this stuff really good. Thanks


#2

Alwyn Cosgrove has explained supplements best:

“Supplements are progress enhancers” They cannot create progress, yet if you are working hard, they will enhance the gains that you are already seeing.

If you’ve gotten some experience under your belt, and are lifting hard and heavy they can definitely be beneficial.
I take a fair number of supplements to really help with recovery and keep everything in order for me. My parents allow me to invest some into them as if they were paying for extra meals, so they’ve really helped me out.

My mainstays:

ZMA (this has really helped my sleep and it helps keep everything in order)

Fish Oil: People take this, but RARELY enough of it. I’m talking 4grams or more of EPA+DHA, that’s when I gain more benefits.

Creatine: Just too much information on this supporting positive benefits, and its cheap as heck. I notice better cognitive function as well

Whey protein: obviously for post workout

Metabolic Drive Complete Protein Shake: This stuff has been amazing too me. I start my days off with it. It has like 50 some grams of protein, along with 8grams of fiber and other goodies. It makes me start off my day feeling great. I (along with a large part of the population) don’t handle carbs well right early in the morning.

Vinpocetine: This is a nootropic, not a sports supplement, but I have noticed enhanced memory for sure. I recall stuff far easier. Its pretty cheap too.

Rhodiola Rosea: This helps manage stress and anxiety for me. My cortisol levels drop and I’m able to see my abs better too. I love it.

I’m a big Biotest/T-nation fanboy, they have quality products and their free shipping can’t be beat, to my house on the east coast from colorado in two days sometimes. Some of their products are pricey, but I figure things out.

ALso, juice plus seems to look solid. i take biotest’s version of it, called “superfood” on occasion, its similar pricepoint, and it makes me feel better. Cause of cost I use it sparingly, but if I start to come down with a cold, it knocks it right out by adding in all the antioxidants.


#3

I think I’m in the minority with my thoughts on this one, especially with what people are willing to put into their bodies nowadays. What happened to having good nutrition? Eating properly? Drinking more water, less pop and beer. How about having drive from within, and not stuff meant to speed up your heart rate. How about learning more about your diet to improve performance, and to improve health conditions. Why is everybody so quick to look for the “quick” fix? Why is everybody looking for the magic bullet? Most people who take supplements don’t even know what’s in them. I think it’s pretty pathetic actually. But hey, our role models do it right?


#4

What happens when you have your diet figured out and you’ve been busting your butt in the weight room? Where does a person go from there?

Why the paranoia, acting like its instantly some harmful substance or something?

My list includes, fish fat, vitamins and minerals, milk protein and a couple herbal substances that have been used for centuries with amazing effectiveness in some parts of the world.

I like the devil’s advocate and find it necessary. Yeah, most kids are on tons of stimulants and garbage. That sucks. But why the extreme approach? No one said it was a magic bullet. I specifically said its a progress “enhancer.” Would you take whey protein for 15% more strength gain over 8 weeks? Its milk…

The kid is looking for research and information. Is it necessary to slam all the broad generalizations out there? I’ve vastly improved my overall well being as well as enhanced my gains… None of the stuff I listed is hardly even a sports supplement, it simply enhances the quality of life for just about anyone.

Do I need to start citing my posts with the studies as well?


#5

What happens when you have your diet figured out and you’ve been busting your butt in the weight room? Where does a person go from there?

Why the paranoia, acting like its instantly some harmful substance or something?

My list includes, fish fat, vitamins and minerals, milk protein and a couple herbal substances that have been used for centuries with amazing effectiveness in some parts of the world.

I like the devil’s advocate and find it necessary. Yeah, most kids are on tons of stimulants and garbage. That sucks. But why the extreme approach? No one said it was a magic bullet. I specifically said its a progress “enhancer.” Would you take whey protein for 15% more strength gain over 8 weeks? Its milk…

The kid is looking for research and information. Is it necessary to slam all the broad generalizations out there? I’ve vastly improved my overall well being as well as enhanced my gains… None of the stuff I listed is hardly even a sports supplement, it simply enhances the quality of life for just about anyone.

Do I need to start citing my posts with the studies as well?[/quote]

CF, I never stated your name in my post. You are amongst a rare few who know what your doing with your body. The vast majority aren’t like yourself. The vast majority of athletes, including some at the professional level, turn to supplements before they improve their diet and nutrition. Some even turn to it before they improve their workout regimen. You are also one of the rare few who knows what is and is not harmful in supplements. Most young athletes assume everything sold at GNC is just fine. This certainly is not the case, as you know. You do your research, other people come on this site and listen to random strangers on what to put in their body. Is this a little more clear?


#6

What happens when you have your diet figured out and you’ve been busting your butt in the weight room? Where does a person go from there?

Why the paranoia, acting like its instantly some harmful substance or something?

My list includes, fish fat, vitamins and minerals, milk protein and a couple herbal substances that have been used for centuries with amazing effectiveness in some parts of the world.

I like the devil’s advocate and find it necessary. Yeah, most kids are on tons of stimulants and garbage. That sucks. But why the extreme approach? No one said it was a magic bullet. I specifically said its a progress “enhancer.” Would you take whey protein for 15% more strength gain over 8 weeks? Its milk…

The kid is looking for research and information. Is it necessary to slam all the broad generalizations out there? I’ve vastly improved my overall well being as well as enhanced my gains… None of the stuff I listed is hardly even a sports supplement, it simply enhances the quality of life for just about anyone.

Do I need to start citing my posts with the studies as well?[/quote]

CF, I never stated your name in my post. You are amongst a rare few who know what your doing with your body. The vast majority aren’t like yourself. The vast majority of athletes, including some at the professional level, turn to supplements before they improve their diet and nutrition. Some even turn to it before they improve their workout regimen. You are also one of the rare few who knows what is and is not harmful in supplements. Most young athletes assume everything sold at GNC is just fine. This certainly is not the case, as you know. You do your research, other people come on this site and listen to random strangers on what to put in their body. Is this a little more clear?[/quote]

Hammer, this is just a microcosm of the general population. Go to any gym and look where people congregate - cardio machines (treadmills, bikes and ellipticals) and weight training machines. The dumbbell area is normally empty except for people doing curls and the squat rack is almost always empty (unless some idiot is in there doing curls). People dont do pullups, dips or other bodyweight exercises either. Why is that? Because people want to do things that are easy. They dont like working out when actual work is involved. I mean, if you can read a book while “working out” on the recumbent bike, then you are not working out. Same goes with nutrition. People have the opportunity to learn and eat properly, but few actually do. The internet allows anyone to research supplements and their effects, but the minority actually do any work.

And just to clarify, I do not even think this is a modern issue. This is just how human beings function. The easiest way is always going to be the most crowded way. You can grab a magazine from 1930 and the back would be filled with ads to help you quite smoking in 7 days, or go from skinny to buff in a month (I actually have a magazine excerpt from 1930 for a paper, and yes, these ads were in the back). This also explains why you have elite participants in everything (sports, business, school, and life) and then you have everyone else who lags far behind. As they say, thats why there is only room for one at the top of the medal stand.


#7

Great post kc, nail has been struck right on the head.


#8

[quote=“centerfield2150”]Alwyn Cosgrove has explained supplements best:

“Supplements are progress enhancers” They cannot create progress, yet if you are working hard, they will enhance the gains that you are already seeing.

If you’ve gotten some experience under your belt, and are lifting hard and heavy they can definitely be beneficial.
I take a fair number of supplements to really help with recovery and keep everything in order for me. My parents allow me to invest some into them as if they were paying for extra meals, so they’ve really helped me out.

My mainstays:

ZMA (this has really helped my sleep and it helps keep everything in order)

Fish Oil: People take this, but RARELY enough of it. I’m talking 4grams or more of EPA+DHA, that’s when I gain more benefits.

Creatine: Just too much information on this supporting positive benefits, and its cheap as heck. I notice better cognitive function as well

Whey protein: obviously for post workout

Metabolic Drive Complete Protein Shake: This stuff has been amazing too me. I start my days off with it. It has like 50 some grams of protein, along with 8grams of fiber and other goodies. It makes me start off my day feeling great. I (along with a large part of the population) don’t handle carbs well right early in the morning.

Vinpocetine: This is a nootropic, not a sports supplement, but I have noticed enhanced memory for sure. I recall stuff far easier. Its pretty cheap too.

Rhodiola Rosea: This helps manage stress and anxiety for me. My cortisol levels drop and I’m able to see my abs better too. I love it.

I’m a big Biotest/T-nation fanboy, they have quality products and their free shipping can’t be beat, to my house on the east coast from colorado in two days sometimes. Some of their products are pricey, but I figure things out.

ALso, juice plus seems to look solid. i take biotest’s version of it, called “superfood” on occasion, its similar pricepoint, and it makes me feel better. Cause of cost I use it sparingly, but if I start to come down with a cold, it knocks it right out by adding in all the antioxidants.[/quote]

Thank you very much! This post is extremely appreciated.

Oh, and last night I spent like 3 hours ready your log. I have recently just been thinking about sleep cycles and REM sleep and that stuff. I will probably be doing some more research and asking some questions about that stuff. Thanks again!


#9

I haven’t read all the posts in this thread, just the first few … but I’m not so sure about the “just take JuicePlus” thing. My aunt’s sold it since 2001, and I’ve read the guy’s book and even attended an Amway, I mean Mary Kay, I mean JuicePlus conference in St. Louis a few years ago. So I’m very familiar with it. But IMHO, I still prefer plain-old fruits and veggies for the nutrients and fiber to keep you going strong. But again, that’s just me. I know everyone’s different.


#10

Is it connected to Amway? I don’t know anything really about it except that it is a replacement for fruits and veggies. I do know Amway has some stuff called Perfectwater that is super good stuff. It supposedly is just water with an extra amount of oxygen. They claim that it increases flexibility and strength immediately, by re hydrating you much faster or something.

I can say that the first time I tried it, I took about one drink and it did immediately increase my flexibility. I couldn’t tell a difference in strength though. Pretty cool stuff.

Oh, but it’s about 2$ a 16 oz. bottle.


#11

But isn’t some supplementation improving your diet? Like I take a whey protein isolate shake mixed with maltrodextrin and dextrose. It gives me protein and carbs that I might not be able to get directly after my workout. For example, I’ll workout after school then I have basketball practice. It takes me 1 minute to inhale a shake.

I also take creatine monohydrate before my workout. It works very good for making you stronger. In my opinion.


#12

No, I was just kidding about the Amway and Mark Kay ref. But the organization is structured similarly. Look, I’m not at all against taking supplements. I took them. So do it if you’re getting the desired results. I just think a well-balanced diet consisting of fruits and veggies and lean meats, in addition to some supplementation is the way to go, if you choose to take something. I just don’t like seeing guys take Juice Plus and loading up on protein shakes as a 100% replacement for “real” food … and trust me, a lot of guys I played with in college did that.

Bower, what kind of creatine and what are you mixing it with?


#13

4everfit creatine monohydrate. I mix it with water. I read up quite a bit on creatine and found a lot of stuff about caffine but I didn’t read that stuff because I rarely ever consume caffine. I had a Mountain Dew today but I’m thinking it was the only soda I’ve had all week.


#14

Yeah, man. I’m with you. Dropped soda in high school. Even diet. But I drink the coffee like mad. Straight up Dunkin Donuts, skim and two splenda. I should try adding some creatine to it for a punch. :slight_smile:

j/k


#15

my opinion CF hit the nail on the head with his post.

If you have a tighter budget Id say the Fish Oil, Whey protein and Creatine are the ones to go with.

That should set you back less than 30 bucks a month.

If you have more to spend then the other ones he listed would be something to look into.


#16

Yeah, man. I’m with you. Dropped soda in high school. Even diet. But I drink the coffee like mad. Straight up Dunkin Donuts, skim and two splenda. I should try adding some creatine to it for a punch. :slight_smile:

j/k[/quote]

I bet I’ll be drinking coffee soon enough. I can sort of see how things work, when the middle schoolers are bouncing off the walls early in the morning and I’m dead tired. I bet soon I won’t even be able to get up.


#17

Hammer, I would say that I am with you most of the way, same with Mr. Ellis, Nutrition plays a huge part in my plan to improve my level of play. It is very hard work to sit down and figure out what foods to put together and how many meals to get everything your body needs.

One of the main reasons supplements are good is that a lot of foods don’t have “all” of the minerals and nutrients in them that they use to. Supplements are just there to help. You can get all the results you need from your foods with some added supplements to pick up what ur food left behind.

I take a multivitamin, multimineral, fish oils, and B complex.
I take whey isolate shakes at certain times of the day, only because of the time involved. At other times, it takes too long to eat whole food meals.
They should never be a substitute for the real thing.

I personally have never been a fan of creatine, I have seen what it has done to people, but that is just my opinions…

If you ever find you are low on energy, or that you aren’t improving in the Gym…a lot of it will depend on what you are putting in your body.

Thanks for reading,
Dan


#18

elaborate… I personally love it, haven’t seen any negative effects in myself or any of my friends using it. but I’m talking just straight monohydrate here.


#19

I was also talking about the monohydrate…I have two friends who have creatine since it first came out and still take it.

Both of them chose to take a break from creatine for a couple months. They notice a lot of side effects. They lost a great deal of mass even in that short period of time, while maintaining all of the nutrition they were taken prior to the break.

The one stipulation that I was always concerned about with them was after taking it for such a long period of time…they bodies almost felt like they didn’t have to produce the small amount of creatine that the body produces naturally…so they were so dependent on the supplement…

But perhaps that’s a small scale to judge on, but that’s a bit of the background…


#20

[quote=“zippa_head”]I was also talking about the monohydrate…I have two friends who have creatine since it first came out and still take it.

Both of them chose to take a break from creatine for a couple months. They notice a lot of side effects. They lost a great deal of mass even in that short period of time, while maintaining all of the nutrition they were taken prior to the break.

The one stipulation that I was always concerned about with them was after taking it for such a long period of time…they bodies almost felt like they didn’t have to produce the small amount of creatine that the body produces naturally…so they were so dependent on the supplement…

But perhaps that’s a small scale to judge on, but that’s a bit of the background…[/quote]

The lost mass was most likely from the loss of the “water weight” straight monohydrate usually puts on. I lost 10lbs when i laid off the stuff in the winter.