Slurves

Are slurves good or bad? I’ve been told that its good because the batter cant tell if its gonna drop or cut and how much it will. And others tell me its bad cause batters can get an easy read of where its gonna go. I learned to throw it, but I dont know if I should bother with it.

they say it is slow and easy to read
if it is easy to hit a hanging slider it is easy to hit a slurve
a slurve is just a cruve thrown from a lower arm angle

NEW NAME Clider

unless it has a s***load of break its gonna be an easy pitch to hit. i would stay away from it and learn a 2 plane curve, 1-7 or 12-6 would be the harder ones to hit.

They say Johnny Sain used to throw one, and he used it effectively. My guess is he did something with it that caused it to break in a way that was hard to hit. You might want to experiment with it and see what happens. If it works, fine; if not, drop it. 8)

a lot of people throw “slurves” they just call it 1/7 or 2/8 breaking balls. its a very effective pitch agains same handed batters and usually a very bad pitch for other side. basically you just want to get some break away from their bat like when throwing it down and away. usually its your regular curveball thrown from lower arm angle or thrown without suppination like a 12/6 curve, almost like a slider but you keep your curveball arm action, the ball spins almost bullet like but slower than a slider

some people call the forkball a poorman knuckleball, you could probably call the “slurve” a poorman slider.

1/7 shouldn’t be called slurves
1/7 is almost 12/6
a slurve is supposed to sweep across
2/8 is the right break

curves, slurves nd sliders should all spin like a bullet
(some k-curves and 12-6 dont)

1/7 shouldn’t be called slurves
1/7 is almost 12/6
a slurve is supposed to sweep across
2/8 is the right break

curves, slurves nd sliders should all spin like a bullet
(some k-curves and 12-6 dont)[/quote]
Wow, great job champ. Good thing nobody here can read a clock.
And I throw a fairly low arm angle sometimes and my curve doesn’t spen remotely like a bullet and, not trying to boost myself up or anything, it’s been ridiculously nasty.

And, I think the difference between a curve and a slurve are slides more than it breaks down. I throw pretty much a 2/8 curve but it looks like a curveball, not a heck of a lot of side movement, thats just the way it travels out of my hand.

[quote]Wow, great job champ. Good thing nobody here can read a clock.
And I throw a fairly low arm angle sometimes and my curve doesn’t spen remotely like a bullet and, not trying to boost myself up or anything, it’s been ridiculously nasty.[/quote]

very sarcastic
duh you throw from a lower arm angle
its probaly not 12/6 neither

thats what i meant by sweeping across

[quote]Wow, great job champ. Good thing nobody here can read a clock.
And I throw a fairly low arm angle sometimes and my curve doesn’t spen remotely like a bullet and, not trying to boost myself up or anything, it’s been ridiculously nasty.[/quote]

very sarcastic
duh you throw from a lower arm angle
its probaly not 12/6 neither

thats what i meant by sweeping across

I’ve also thrown straight over the top nad it doesn’t spin like a bullet then either.

Sorry to be blunt but…kelvinp apparently does not have a clue about this topic.

The gyroball has bullet-spin, with the spin axis directed exactly at the target. Gyroballs drop under the influence of gravity (same as any pitch does) however, they have no lateral movement when thrown correctly.

Sliders have off-center bullet-like spin. They drop normally under the influence of gravity; however, the off-center axis of spin causes these pitches to break slightly to the side away from the pitcher’s throwing arm. Because they are thrown with fairly high velocity, many hitters have a hard time adjusting to good sliders even with the small break.

Curve balls have a spin axis that is perpendicular to a straight line from rubber to plate. This is the same as the spin axis of a fastball; however, the curveball is thrown with topspin (which gives it a big downward drop compared to what is expected from gravity alone) and, of course, the fastball is thrown with backspin (which gives it much less of a drop than expected from gravity alone). The pitcher’s functional arm-slot will largely determine orientation of the spin axis with respect to the plane of the ground. Thus, an over-the-top pitcher–a Koufax, Nomo, or Hoffman–can get approximately 12-to-6 topspin rotation on curves and 6-to-12 backspin rotation on FBs. The same pitch types delivered by side-armed pitchers will also have “topspin” and “backspin”, respectively, because of the way they are released. However, the spin axes of their versions of these pitches are at right angles to the over-the-top pitchers.

[quote]Sliders have off-center bullet-like spin. They drop normally under the influence of gravity; however, the off-center axis of spin causes these pitches to break slightly to the side away from the pitcher’s throwing arm. Because they are thrown with fairly high velocity, many hitters have a hard time adjusting to good sliders even with the small break.

Curve balls have a spin axis that is perpendicular to a straight line from rubber to plate. This is the same as the spin axis of a fastball; however, the curveball is thrown with topspin (which gives it a big downward drop compared to what is expected from gravity alone) and, of course, the fastball is thrown with backspin (which gives it much less of a drop than expected from gravity alone). The pitcher’s functional arm-slot will largely determine orientation of the spin axis with respect to the plane of the ground. Thus, an over-the-top pitcher–a Koufax, Nomo, or Hoffman–can get approximately 12-to-6 topspin rotation on curves and 6-to-12 backspin rotation on FBs. The same pitch types delivered by side-armed pitchers will also have “topspin” and “backspin”, respectively, because of the way they are released. However, the spin axes of their versions of these pitches are at right angles to the over-the-top pitchers.[/quote]

a curve does not hav ethe same spin axis as a fastball
a curve shouldn’t have backspin
when you snap your wrist and supinate that should give it a spiral spin
no matter what armslot it is thrown from, sliders and curves are upposed to have side spin
when you release the pitch you come across the side of the ball making side spin

if you throw over hand your curve might spin like a fastball if it is 12/6

HAHAHHAHAHAHA HE DOESN’T KNOW WHAT AN AXIS IS?[/youtube]

[quote=“kelvinp”][quote]Sliders have off-center bullet-like spin. They drop normally under the influence of gravity; however, the off-center axis of spin causes these pitches to break slightly to the side away from the pitcher’s throwing arm. Because they are thrown with fairly high velocity, many hitters have a hard time adjusting to good sliders even with the small break.

Curve balls have a spin axis that is perpendicular to a straight line from rubber to plate. This is the same as the spin axis of a fastball; however, the curveball is thrown with topspin (which gives it a big downward drop compared to what is expected from gravity alone) and, of course, the fastball is thrown with backspin (which gives it much less of a drop than expected from gravity alone). The pitcher’s functional arm-slot will largely determine orientation of the spin axis with respect to the plane of the ground. Thus, an over-the-top pitcher–a Koufax, Nomo, or Hoffman–can get approximately 12-to-6 topspin rotation on curves and 6-to-12 backspin rotation on FBs. The same pitch types delivered by side-armed pitchers will also have “topspin” and “backspin”, respectively, because of the way they are released. However, the spin axes of their versions of these pitches are at right angles to the over-the-top pitchers.[/quote]

a curve does not hav ethe same spin axis as a fastball
a curve shouldn’t have backspin
when you snap your wrist and supinate that should give it a spiral spin
no matter what armslot it is thrown from, sliders and curves are upposed to have side spin
when you release the pitch you come across the side of the ball making side spin

if you throw over hand your curve might spin like a fastball if it is 12/6[/quote]

Oh so wrong again. My curve spins like my fastball but topspin instead. You come over the top of the ball, thus creating that drop down. Why in God’s name should a curveball and slider spin the same if they have different movement? Do you read what you post?

[quote]Oh so wrong again. My curve spins like my fastball but topspin instead. You come over the top of the ball, thus creating that drop down. Why in God’s name should a curveball and slider spin the same if they have different movement? Do you read what you post?

[/quote]

you probaly dont get alot of lateral movement either
different armangles produce different spin

a curve and slider can have the same spin but be thrown at different speeds
when you throw a curve with the one finger grip you get side spin like a slider

if you snap your wrist and supinate you are gonna have side spin

[quote=“kelvinp”][quote]Oh so wrong again. My curve spins like my fastball but topspin instead. You come over the top of the ball, thus creating that drop down. Why in God’s name should a curveball and slider spin the same if they have different movement? Do you read what you post?

[/quote]

you probaly dont get alot of lateral movement either
different armangles produce different spin

a curve and slider can have the same spin but be thrown at different speeds
when you throw a curve with the one finger grip you get side spin like a slider

if you snap your wrist and supinate you are gonna have side spin[/quote]

Kelvin, your digging yourself into another hole. a curveball and a slider are totally different pitches, a slider moves sharp and horizontal, when most curves are slower and drop off the table. you dont suppinate on a curve like you do a slider. you do exactly what 3and0 said, come over the top.

Actually a correctly thrown 12-6 curve will have the same axis as a fastball. If you take a baseball drill a hole in it, place a rod through the hole and spin it like a 4-seam, its the same axis if you spin it backwards it will be the curveball spin.

Where in his quote does he state that a curveball has backspin. Actually it says quite the oposite. Here I will enlighten you.

[quote=“kelvinp”]
no matter what armslot it is thrown from, sliders and curves are upposed to have side spin
if you throw over hand your curve might spin like a fastball if it is 12/6[/quote]

A curve should never really have side-spin. That is a slurve. A real curve should be 12-6 or 1-7. Sliders are more side to side but are thrown harder like a fastball.

kelvinp is a parasite to this website in the way that he always thinks he’s right while he’s 90% of the time wrong and that makes young kids coming up here get the bad information and lead to them trying to do stuffs the wrong way.

if i were you kelvinp i would read a little bit about baseball instead of just making things up from your mind or what you think you see.

[quote]Actually a correctly thrown 12-6 curve will have the same axis as a fastball. If you take a baseball drill a hole in it, place a rod through the hole and spin it like a 4-seam, its the same axis if you spin it backwards it will be the curveball spin.

[/quote]

i know that
but it is not possible to throw a 1/7 or2/8 with complete backspin

i beleive that is only for 12/6 break

it should have side spin
but not complete side spin
the snapping of the wrist and supination will cause an off axis spin

If a curve and slider have the same spin, wouldn’t they just be the same pitch? Why are they two different pitches? Are they moving differently?

So Josh Beckett throws a slider with his one finger grip curve?