Slitter/Split change help

Ok so i have tried every type of changeup with little success. I was looking for a little help with a splitter since it is one of the alternatives to a changeup. I have tried just a split 2-seam grip, but when i throw it, it’s not much slower and only moves like a sinker when i do throw it. I was wondering if anyone could give me a few tips or could upload some pics of a Lincecum or Halladay Splitter grip.

Look at “articles” right next to the discussion forum. Pitching grips are a big topic.

The biggest thing with throwing a changeup is throwing it like a fastball. Your probably slowing down your arm. I’ve also noticed with a changeup, that if you drop your arm below your elbow your changeup success will drop.

You have to throw every pitch, and I mean EVERY pitch, with the same arm motion and the same arm speed as the fast ball. Not only does slowing down your arm speed adversely affect your changeup, it also tips off the batter as to what’s coming.
I watched Saturday’s and today’s Red Sox-Mariners games on TV, and I watched Mariners closer Brandon League closely. He threw a lot of fast balls, yes, but on the two-strike count he threw an 88-MPH splitter that had the Red Sox batters swinging and missing by a mile—and he threw that splitter with the same arm motion and the same arm speed as the fast ball. which is what one is supposed to do. You use the different grips to alter the speed of changeups.
The splitter is actually a first cousin to the forkball, but it’s easier to throw because you don’t use the extreme grip that you have to use for the forkball. Grip the ball with the index and middle fingers off the seams, spread as wide as is comfortable, but you don’t actually grip the ball between those two fingers—I wouldn’t advise attempting the forkball unless you have a King Kong-size paw. Now, as for the slider—the grip is very much off-center, with the index and middle fingers very close together and one of those fingers just touching one seam, with the thumb underneath, on a seam, for balance and support. And you throw it like a curve, but roll your wrist, don’t snap it—think of a chef flipping a pancake or a crepe.
And there’s a whole closetful of changeups to choose from, so you can have your pick. But the cardinal rule is the same: you have to throw each one with the same motion and the same arm speed as for the fast ball. Oh yeah—consider the knuckle-curve. The name speaks for itself; you get a knuckleball grip and throw the curve ball with it. A suggestion: when you throw it, try a sharp karate-chop wrist snap. I used to do this, and that curve broke very sharply downward, and the batters couldn’t do anything with it! 8) :baseballpitcher:

You have to throw every pitch, and I mean EVERY pitch, with the same arm motion and the same arm speed as the fast ball. Not only does slowing down your arm speed adversely affect your changeup, it also tips off the batter as to what’s coming.
I watched Saturday’s and today’s Red Sox-Mariners games on TV, and I watched Mariners closer Brandon League closely. He threw a lot of fast balls, yes, but on the two-strike count he threw an 88-MPH splitter that had the Red Sox batters swinging and missing by a mile—and he threw that splitter with the same arm motion and the same arm speed as the fast ball. which is what one is supposed to do. You use the different grips to alter the speed of changeups.
The splitter is actually a first cousin to the forkball, but it’s easier to throw because you don’t use the extreme grip that you have to use for the forkball. Grip the ball with the index and middle fingers off the seams, spread as wide as is comfortable, but you don’t actually grip the ball between those two fingers—I wouldn’t advise attempting the forkball unless you have a King Kong-size paw. Now, as for the slider—the grip is very much off-center, with the index and middle fingers very close together and one of those fingers just touching one seam, with the thumb underneath, on a seam, for balance and support. And you throw it like a curve, but roll your wrist, don’t snap it—think of a chef flipping a pancake or a crepe.
And there’s a whole closetful of changeups to choose from, so you can have your pick. But the cardinal rule is the same: you have to throw each one with the same motion and the same arm speed as for the fast ball. Oh yeah—consider the knuckle-curve. The name speaks for itself; you get a knuckleball grip and throw the curve ball with it. A suggestion: when you throw it, try a sharp karate-chop wrist snap. I used to do this, and that curve broke very sharply downward, and the batters couldn’t do anything with it! 8) :baseballpitcher:
OOPS!!!DOUBLE POST

I have tried the traditional splitter grip and played with the depth of the grip while keeping fastball arm speed the problem is that with fastball arm speed my ball either does nothing or barely talils. I was wondering how Roy halladay and Tim lincecum gripped their split-change because theirs seem to have more of a change-up effect as opposed to a splitter like Jon papelbon where there is less drop. Also how is a splitter supposed to spin? I saw lincecum throw his in slow mo and it looked like the ball spun like a slider but not as fast a rotation. I don’t understand how this makes the ball drop.

Holding the ball farther back in the palm of the hand will probably slow down the speed of the splitter (making it more like a fosh change). Make sure to throw it with fastball arm speed.

That is interesting I’ve never tried holding a split closer to the palm. I thought itwas just a pitch with the ball away from your palm like a fastball. I’ll give it a try, but if anyone has pictures of a lincecum or halladay split tha would be very helpful. Also how is a splitter supposed to spin?

Generally the splitter is held like a fastball,
but when held farther back in the hand it turns out more like a change-up.
Slows it down, not quite sure about the movement.

Here’s Halladay pitching a splitter/change-up.

Here is Dan Haren throwing a splitter.
It’s one of his better pitches.

To answer your question about the rotation of the splitter/ forkball. The rotation is such that it allows essentialy a traectory change; with my forkball this change happens very late. When gripped correctly and thrown like a fastball (see wrist snap specifically), the ball will start with back spin. As it travels closer to the plate, the ball will transition to losing all of the back and start gaining forward spin (this accounts for this pitch’s ability to drop off the table).

I apologize if I sound arrogant but in all of my years playing baseball (18), my forkball is the most unhittable pitch I’ve ever witnessed in person; even at the D1 SEC level. Due to the rotation of the pitch and my blessing to be able to throw it with the efficacy that I do, it honestly seems like it is literally unhittable. I find that 9 times out of ten, the nature of my forkball freezes batters, meaning that it looks so appealing out of the hand, yet has such drastic change in trajectory/movement/ spin/ velocity that they are simply baffled; even with two strikes. If they do manage to get a swing in, it is so futile that I actually feel sorry for most batters i throw it to. The more you choke the ball between your two fingers the more forkball like it will be, and with the opposite, the more splitter like it will be. The glory of these two pitches is if they do manage to hit it when it’s thrown well, it pretty much a gauranteed ground ball.

With that said, with everything in life, there are multiple sides to the coin. The first being that you really can’t afford to hang this pitch. I feel like this is definitely the worst pitch to hang; being a result of lack of movement and not neccesarily of location. In addition, I am very lucky to be able to throw this pitch, especially with the movement that i do however, I tend to be a max effort pitcher; therefor I tend to sweat very easily, especially in my pitching hand. anytime there is sweat/ moisture on my pitching hand i have to ditch this pitch. If you don’t have big hands/ long fingers, any sort of slippage will really mess with this pitch.