Slider, At what age?

I know it isn’t. I was just asking why he thought most pitchers wanted that particular action on the ball. I know why its generally the “most” effective action on the ball, but I don’t know that most pitchers want that action for that reason.

4pie has pretty much nailed it. Excellent narration and approach. In addition, very well thought out for the very young who read this site and decide on adding this pitch (slider) to their inventory.

Again, very well stated - 4pie, nicely done.

Coach B.

So I went back and read what he said.

I’m not sure how one “works” on control besides proper mechanics. If one could “develop” control pitchers would be a dime a dozen and nobody would be talking about the “greats”, they’d all be great.

My son has worked pretty hard but just can’t get the pinpoint accuracy some show. So if he has a future in ball it won’t be as a pitcher, so be it he has other assets.

To compensate he has worked hard on his change and added his “slider”. In tournament ball having pitchers is a must, and he can eat up some innings. So he has become an asset on the mound even though he’s not the “go to” guy.

And I can show you a few kids that would argue the pitches effectiveness, even when thrown off-speed (form a lower arm slot at least).

[quote=“4pie”]

first of all, who have good sliders? pitchers with good fastballs. because a slider is a fastball until it disapears and if you arent scared of the fastball youre not scared of the slider either. and a good fastball doesnt always means a overpowering one, it mostly means a fastball you can control. when you control the fastball you can add any pitch you want to your arsenal and it will be a great pitch, just because hitters always have fastballin the back of their mind and everything else is off speed or with movement.[/quote]

Well said. First, get a good FB. 67% - 70% strike to ball ratio is a good (and hard) goal to achieve. If and when the hitters are scared of the FB, experiment with the slider . . . or the cutter, etc. It seems to me the 2-seamer, 4-seamer, slider and cutter are FB in essence with different ball movements and using different grips.

[quote=“SomeBaseballDad”]…I’m not sure how one “works” on control besides proper mechanics.

If one could “develop” control pitchers would be a dime a dozen and nobody would be talking about the “greats”, they’d all be great. [/quote]

While I don’t believe proper mechanics is the way to best work on control either, I’ve many times expressed the other thought you expressed. I’ve heard it said many many that pitchers should 1st worry about velocity because they can be taught to “pitch” later. That generally expresses the idea that velocity can’t be taught but control, movement and mental discipline can.

Well, look at any team on any level and what percentage of those pitchers has both way above normal velocity, plus above normal movement on his other pitches with above normal command. When you do that you see that the old saying isn’t so accurate. :wink:

[quote]My son has worked pretty hard but just can’t get the pinpoint accuracy some show. So if he has a future in ball it won’t be as a pitcher, so be it he has other assets.

To compensate he has worked hard on his change and added his “slider”. In tournament ball having pitchers is a must, and he can eat up some innings. So he has become an asset on the mound even though he’s not the “go to” guy.

And I can show you a few kids that would argue the pitches effectiveness, even when thrown off-speed (form a lower arm slot at least).[/quote]

The entire pinpoint accuracy thing for pitchers is so blown out of proportion its pathetic. People who believe pitchers have pinpoint accuracy or imply that average and above pitchers have pinpoint accuracy should be forced at the point of a gun to define what they mean by PINPOINT.

When one thinks of accuracy, they have to have a picture of what that means in their head. Pinpoint accuracy for a rifle marksman might be 6-6 shots in a 1” bullseye at 100 yards with the rifle and ammo of his choice, standing still and firing at a stationary target. For someone shooting darts it might be 3-3 shots in a ½” bullseye at 7’6” with the darts of their choice, standing still and throwing at a stationary target.

But even the very best rifle marksmen and dart throwers don’t always have pinpoint accuracy. Its that they are MORE accurate MORE often that allows them to win on any given day, not that every shot they take is perfection. With pitchers though, it a bit different.

Yes their target is stationary, but their bullseye changes with every hitter! The vertical size not only goes up and down, but every hitter has different traits that mean different targets all the time. Plus, in order to get that batter out, different pitches are thrown very often, each with slightly different mechanics. But the really big difference is, a pitcher is trying to do it while his body is moving at full speed! So in the end, there are pitcher who are very accurate indeed, but not in comparison to a guy with a rifle or throwing darts.

In the end, it doesn’t take great control for a pitcher to be successful. What it takes is a blending of velocity, control, movement, and mental discipline. Plus, a great offense and defense supporting him helps a bunch too. I’m betting everyone could think of at least one really good pitcher who never got to go to the next level because of that, or did go to the next level because of that. :wink:

Tell your kid to just keep doing his best and working hard. As long as he gets the job done at the level his coach expects, he’ll be fine.