Sinker


#1

How do you throw a sinker?


#2

Well, you hold the ball with a 2-seamer grip. You will get better movement if you throw 3/4. It is hard to get any sinking coming from a straight overhand position. I grip the ball with the 2-seam grip at the widest part of the seams. Then I throw the ball and try to follow through with the ball and stay on top of the ball. That’s really all you can do without pronating your wrist. Pedro Astacio has a good 2-seamer. Almost along the lines of a screwball.


#3

Two-seam grip, with middle finger against outside of a seam and thumb directly underneath or riding just slightly up toward the side of the ball. Upon release, apply pressure with the inside pad of the tip of your middle finger against the outside of the seam.

You can also try curling the thumb underneath the ball to cause more drag.

Target should be the catcher’s knees or ankles.


#4

[quote=“Jay21328”]How do you throw a sinker?[/quote]\

A sinker that is derived at by basically throwing a two seam fastball, which is how it is generally thrown would be released off of the index finger. There may be some semantics at work here too inso what a sinker is. A true sinker is a ball thats fades which generally is meant to mean it goes down and away from the hitter. A cutter or slider, two different pitches generally run in on the hitter . The slider also goes down a true cutter just runs into the hitter with no downward movement. Which brings another point to light. If you got a kid throwing a cutter and it is dropping that is no cutter more often than not it is a “weak slider” Back to the point about fading and running, fade/away as opposed to run/hitters side, Im not saying anything about a slider or cutter other than they run in on the hitter opposed to a sinker or perhaps screwball/certain changes that fades or runs away from the hitter. A long while back Stephen made a good observation about the varying lengths of peoples index and middle fingers and how this could affect the two seamers movement/effectiveness due to the difference in the lengths of the two fingers. Meaning for some it is more difficult to put the spin where it needs to be in order for the sinker to actually work. One things for sure as joe said it must be thrown down in the zone to be effective for most pitchers. Some people have better results by[ for lack of a better explanation ] sort of “predialing” the pitch when you grip the ball. In other words when you grip the ball try gripping in a way that when you throw it it just “feels” like it is going to ALREADY have that sinker spin. This can be done by having the throwing arm hand already a tad pronated or the way the pitcher just grips the ball and than sets his thumb. It just feels like it is going to have that spin on it that makes it fade. After this has been solved than the pitcher must learn how hard he has to throw it to getr the best sinking action for him. You may have heard some people say “hes throwing it through the sink” aka jeff weavers problem at times. he just throws it to hard and thus “hes throwing through the sink”. hope this helps a little good luck!


#5

A cutter or slider, two different pitches generally run in on the hitter

I believe you are backwards here Chin, on a right handed batter with a right handed pitcher, a slider breaks away from him as evidence I’ll point to the most famous WS slider I can think of, Bob Gibson to Gates Brown, the pitch started behind his back and broke to the outside corner. You almost never see a Maddux sinker do anything but move down and in, usually causing a batter to fist a weak ground ball. Everything else sounds good.

Jay…learn this pitch, it’s a real good pitch that has no more harmful effect than a fastball, because that is all that it is a variant of the fb. It’s a great way to get to many many 3 pitch innings, fame, fortune and a happy New Year!!!
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#6

[quote=“jdfromfla”]A cutter or slider, two different pitches generally run in on the hitter

I believe you are backwards here Chin, on a right handed batter with a right handed pitcher, a slider breaks away from him as evidence I’ll point to the most famous WS slider I can think of, Bob Gibson to Gates Brown, the pitch started behind his back and broke to the outside corner. You almost never see a Maddux sinker do anything but move down and in, usually causing a batter to fist a weak ground ball. Everything else sounds good.

Jay…learn this pitch, it’s a real good pitch that has no more harmful effect than a fastball, because that is all that it is a variant of the fb. It’s a great way to get to many many 3 pitch innings, fame, fortune and a happy New Year!!!

.[/quote] Yes you are correct, my mistake. The real point was about the sinker it goes away or fades. It also should come off the index finger upon release, actually that was the main point I wanted to make. Im a lefty so everything I think has to be reversed for a righty I didnt take that into consideration. happy new year


#7

[quote=“chinmusic”][quote=“jdfromfla”]
The real point was about the sinker it goes away or fades. It also should come off the index finger upon release, actually that was the main point I wanted to make. [/quote]

A sinker does not NECESSARILY have to come off the index finger. It varies from pitcher to pitcher — and as you mentioned it could have something to do with the length of the fingers.

Some coaches teach pronation, I teach pressure points; both can create the same result. Even with pressure points, there’s variation in method. For example, I tend to teach that a pitcher use his middle finger for all pressure (though it depends on the person). Tom Seaver believed in alternating pressure with the index or middle finger depending on the pitch.

In the end, a pitcher should be taught all the different methods until something “clicks”, and/or he finds a comfort zone (and results!).

Just wanted to point out that there aren’t necessarily any absolutes with this pitch — generally, a pitcher can work on different grips and concepts and eventually find what works best for him.

Good luck and happy new year!