Sidearm Mechanics Analysis


#1

Hey guys, I’m a sophomore in college and just looking for some help with my mechanics. I know this video is not the best camera work, so i’ll try to get another one up with more angles asap. Thanks


#2

I do not think it would be responsible to make many suggestions without seeing you at game speed and get more background from you before making any recommendations.

What does your coaching staff have to say about your mechanics? Is there any kind of injury you are rehabbing from? Do you have any concerns? What kind of velocity do you have currently?

With that said, I will say that I’m not crazy about your arm action from what I can see in this clip. You have very little forearm layback so it makes your throwing arm look very stiff and not “whippy”. You have little scapular loading.

But some or all of this may change when/if you are at full speed.


#3

I agree with 101. It also looks like your leg kick height and body speed are a little inconsistent pitch to pitch, too. And you could probably come “set” a little taller, not sitting back so much.

What issues have you been working on?


#4

First of all, thanks for the quick response. The only mechanical component that my coaches really stress is tempo, and speeding up the delivery. Typically, though, as long as you get the ball to the plate in 1.4 sec. or quicker, you’re good.

No injuries to speak of other than a few nagging injuries but nothing requiring significant rehab.

My only real concern is that in the 3+ years I’ve been pitching sidearm, I’ve never really been able to break down my mechanics. Past pitching coaches helped me with the basics of dropping down, but I don’t think I’ve ever broken down my mechanics systematically other than the absolute fundamentals (which admittedly, I may have become a little too comfortable with these fundamentals).

As far as my velocity is concerned, my fastball typically sits 81-83. I’ve always been a guy that has relied on control and movement to get guys out, so the most honest reason for figuring out the nuances of my mechanics now is in hopes of adding a few ticks on my fastball.

Thanks again guys


#5

You might want to study these guys:

Personally, I liked your mechanics pretty well the way they are right now…


#6

[quote]You might want to study these guys:

Personally, I liked your mechanics pretty well the way they are right now…[/quote]
Thanks for the links, laflippin. I’ll definitely look more into those. Being from Atlanta, I love watching clips of Peter Moylan, but these should help me grasp certain aspects of my delivery better.


#7

I like Moylan, too. I don’t have any video of him but there’s a nice clip of PM warming in a bullpen in the LTP video clips collection.

Sidewinders need to stick together…here’s a clip of my son, pitching at a prospect camp:


#8

[quote] agree with 101. It also looks like your leg kick height and body speed are a little inconsistent pitch to pitch, too. And you could probably come “set” a little taller, not sitting back so much.

What issues have you been working on?[/quote]

I definitely agree about the inconsistencies in my leg kick, thats something I’ve been working on recently. After looking at the video, one major thing I see is very little hip/shoulder separation, so thats something I will start working on in my next throwing session tomorrow. Thanks for the input.


#9

I remember when I was eleven years old, and one day a bunch of us was playing catch in the schoolyard during recess, and I discovered that I had a natural sidearm delivery. The funny thing was what came attached to it—a pretty good curve ball. So I worked around with it, learned to change speeds (not that I was very fast), added a knuckle-curve and a palm ball, and got into playing baseball. A couple of years later I picked up on the crossfire—that’s a move that works only with the sidearm delivery—and then, at age 16, I met Ed Lopat and learned how to throw a good slider.
I used the slide-step all the time, which enabled me to add some speed to my delivery, and I quickly found out that throwing sidearm, being the most natural of all pitching deliveries, meant no sore arm or sore elbow or sore anything else. What fun it was, building up a whole arsenal of breaking pitches around that slider, using the crossfire, discombooberating the hitters, and winning a lot of games. And whoever said that sidearmers need to stick together was absolutely right! :slight_smile: 8) :baseballpitcher: