Side arm

http://www.thecompletepitcher.com/sidearm_pitching.htm
"It is proven that sidearm pitchers are more prone to injuries than over the top pitchers. "

http://www.thecompletepitcher.com/sidearm_pitching_mechanics.htm
"Sidearm pitching can be a very effective throwing method for some pitchers. It puts less stress on your arm, and produces a natural movement of the baseball."

Which statement is true?

Any videos of other side arm pitchers besides Randy?

Laflippins YouTube Channel!

If you read Stevens stuff all the way through, he points out that it is effective…but…he caveats much of it as being a method of delivery more suited today, to relief pitchers and generally speaking guys in the bigs with that aspect, picked it up as a means to stay in the league.

Great pitchers besides Randy have delivered from this aspect…but statistically, if you look at it, they are outliers and it is the uniqueness of the arm angle which makes them effective but usually only for an inning or so.

One states more injury, the other states less injury

I disagree with your assessment. I think. He’s in essence saying that it “can be” effective but that there are caveats. Iow he doesn’t just say bad or good just lays out his knowledge and exp. are you trying to determine something or did you see an inconsistancy and want it explained?

(sidearm is) “prone to injury” versus (sidearm)“puts less stress on your arm”

Im not trying to argue, just these two phases seem to be opposites, and I want to try to understand before trying to switch to side arm. thanks

Well why would you?
Is there a pain issue? Or is it performance based?
The upshot is that today, the side-armer (Good or bad) is a specialty pitcher, as a general rule, I’ve seen college coaches attempt to make at least one of their staff “designated” as the side-armer, this in and of itself can lead to injury so it is a path frought with possible negatives but the upside is that many teams desire at least one.

Uber awsome jd. :smiley:

I am naturally a side arm (3 yrs) and got changed up to 3/4 at the beginning of this spring from my pitching coach because he also states “rumors” of side arm injury. I think I throw a little harder 3/4, but I dont like my movement, and now want to go back to side arm.

My mechanics resemble more like Randy Johnson then Eckersley. Eckersley seems to have a lower slot then Randy. Thanks for the info, I think Im going to go Sidearm.

I wonder why Randy J uses Split finger as his changeUp and not a regular straight changeUp. Maybe the Split finger is a better pitch, of course much harder to learn.

WHOA NELLIE!!!
And so here we go again—round and round the mulberry bush and getting nowhere fast. Now let me add my 75 cents’ worth on the subject (inflation, you know).
The sidearm delivery is actually the easiest on the arm and shoulder, being the most natural delivery, and believe me, it puts no strain on said arm and shoulder. There are two ways to deliver a pitch this way—long-arm, as exemplified by Walter Johnson, and short-arm, like Jeff Nelson used to do. The beauty part of pitching this way, however one does it, is that batters can’t pick up the pitches, they can’t set themselves because they don’t know where the darn thing is coming from. And sidearmers have a weapon other types of pitchers don’t have: the crossfire. How well I know, because in my playing days I was one of those exasperating, infuriating sidearmers who used the crossfire all the time and racked up more than my share of strikeouts. And I never had any arm or shoulder problems.
So…if you’re really comfortable with this delivery, stay with it, and don’t let anyone try to change what you’re doing. 8)

my experience and what I have read tells me that it may be slightly more stress on the elbow and less at the shoulder, in addition to much more potential lumbar stress.

I’m always the most sore at the elbow, with only minor shoulder soreness. My back injury history has taught me that rotating at the lumbar spine from this type of delivery can be particularly harmful. Hip and thoracic mobility is a must, and great scapular mobility is necessary to achieve respectable velocity from this slot

[quote=“Zita Carno”]WHOA NELLIE!!!
And so here we go again—round and round the mulberry bush and getting nowhere fast. Now let me add my 75 cents’ worth on the subject (inflation, you know).
The sidearm delivery is actually the easiest on the arm and shoulder, being the most natural delivery, and believe me, it puts no strain on said arm and shoulder. There are two ways to deliver a pitch this way—long-arm, as exemplified by Walter Johnson, and short-arm, like Jeff Nelson used to do. The beauty part of pitching this way, however one does it, is that batters can’t pick up the pitches, they can’t set themselves because they don’t know where the darn thing is coming from. And sidearmers have a weapon other types of pitchers don’t have: the crossfire. How well I know, because in my playing days I was one of those exasperating, infuriating sidearmers who used the crossfire all the time and racked up more than my share of strikeouts. And I never had any arm or shoulder problems.
So…if you’re really comfortable with this delivery, stay with it, and don’t let anyone try to change what you’re doing. 8)[/quote]

Do you believe LHP stands on the Left side and RHP stands on the right side of the rubber? in general and especially sidearm?

[quote=“LankyLefty”]

[/quote]

That “looks” like a low side arm, high submarine pitcher like Eckersly as opposed to high sidearm like Johnson.

it honestly varies a little bit…throwing my hardest it is probably more like johnson, but on bad mounds or when I start to fatigue it drops a bit and I’m more in that 86-88 range instead of 89-91

either way, I get sore in the same places. Definitely not “no stress” on the arm.

Yea ur arm slot is a higher here. I wish I could see ur windup better. Johnson also shows a lower arm slot when he is tired, but adds the new slot makes the batters re-read him.