Should the arm be straight at release?

Should it be at 180 degrees or less at the release? I think I have had a straight arm at the realease this year and it causes soreness and some pain. Here are some pics:




if anything is causing you to have pain then stop doing it but you can tell by these pictures that their arm is almost straight at release

why is this question even being asked? It’s impossible to throw a baseball at high speed (or even average speed) without your arm going to full extension at release. It has absolutely no connection to injury…all pitchers do it. That’s like asking if you can jump without your legs straightening out…sure I guess it’s possible, but if you want to jump high at all, your legs will straighten out naturally. Stop obsessing over this.

Sorry, but this is wrong. Look at the picture of Smoltz. His elbow is not fully extended. A fully extended elbow will slam your ulna and radius bones together. It can also rupture your UCL.

If you jump and fully extend your knees such that it locks out, you are doing damage to your knees AND not jumping any higher than you would with knees bent less than 180 degrees.

For the original question, NO you do not want full 180 degrees extension. You want it to be slightly bent. See picture below. Courtesy of KyleB. Koufax’s elbow is closer to full extension than the other pitcher. Ask yourself why did Koufax retire?

This is called “forearm separation”. It is something that Mike Marshall and Bill Peterson
http://rpmpitching.com/
teaches their pitchers. Some MLB pitchers exhibit less separation than others.

As you can see, Smoltz has more than Mussina and Kazmir. Kazmir is currently on the DL with a hyperextended elbow. Gee I wonder how that happened?

Sorry, but this is wrong. Look at the picture of Smoltz. His elbow is not fully extended. A fully extended elbow will slam your ulna and radius bones together. It can also rupture your UCL.

If you jump and fully extend your knees such that it locks out, you are doing damage to your knees AND not jumping any higher than you would with knees bent less than 180 degrees.

For the original question, NO you do not want full 180 degrees extension. You want it to be slightly bent. See picture below. Courtesy of KyleB. Koufax’s elbow is closer to full extension than the other pitcher. Ask yourself why did Koufax retire?

This is called “forearm separation”. It is something that Mike Marshall and Bill Peterson
http://rpmpitching.com/
teaches their pitchers. Some MLB pitchers exhibit less separation than others.

As you can see, Smoltz has more than Mussina and Kazmir. Kazmir is currently on the DL with a hyperextended elbow. Gee I wonder how that happened?[/quote]

ok

Yes, from all the video I’ve watched, the arm is always fully extended at release. The release points and arm angles, of course, are what’s different here between different pitchers.

Steven Ellis posted:
Yes, from all the video I’ve watched, the arm is always fully extended at release. The release points and arm angles, of course, are what’s different here between different pitchers.

The reason for his post is due - more than likely, to the fact that professionals are train’d in a totally different mode than other ball players. Yes - their arms are fully extended … and yes they do have release points and arm angles …BUT… unlike the amateur pitcher(s) who FIRES at a release point and is rarely train’d to complete the entire pitching exerience with a TEMPO of complete and smooth exchanging of the glove shoulder (G) with pitching § shoulder… complimenting this exchange with support by the torso… bending and leaning forward INTO THE PITCH.

Take a look at my expample below and you’ll see just how important this process is. Basically, from the start of your delivery to its end … there is energy that must be released TO THE BALL … NOT TO YOUR ARM. I know this sounds like a play on words … but it’s anything but.

When I see a rookie or even a veteran pitcher cranking out heavy duty stuff … and their arm/elbow/shoulder…etc is taking the brunt of the pitch, I let them go through their motions (delivery) at one third (1/3 ) game speed with a medium duty mason’s hammer. At the point where the player feels the “tugging” of the weight as he brings his arm up and over, I’ll instruct him to avoid this weight shifting and concentrate on a smoother more proportional delivery. After usually three days … on average, the player will exibit a smoother … less dramatic pitching arm compliment… and that’s on all pitches. A simple start to this process by the way … is to remember to … BURY THE PITCHING SHOULDER INTO THE CATCHER. For those of you who make it to the upper college level(s), you’ll hear that a lot.

So, arm extension and elbow stress are one of many subjects topical to poor upper body discipline(s).

Also, I know the above sounds confusing, and if further comments are asked for, I’ll try to explain my example better.

Coach B.