Shot putters and pitchers?


#1

they launch heavy metal balls about 60 feet which is about the mound to homeplate. They need extreme strength and skill to do this.

Good we do the same workout routines as a shot putter.
or is it the same thing?


#2

No, lol nice idea though. There action is different. They push the ball upwards where as we throw the ball horizontaly. the ball weight as u mentioned is a lot different so they have more strain on the arms.
But, the work they do on there tricept should be good for a pitcher.


#3

[quote=“Booma”]But, the work they do on there tricept should be good for a pitcher.[/quote]The triceps have very little to do with pitching.


#4

From what ive been told by many coaches and book, in terms of the upper arm, its the tricept the does most of the work not the bicept. I got told not to do bicept curls to work on tricept and rotatorcuff work.


#5

DM,

I think I know what you’re alluding to - that the extension of the elbow happens so fast that there is no concsious activity in the tricep, there’s only a whipping action created by rotation and elastic energy. (Correct me if I’m wrong.) But, on the other hand, pitchers have been known to complain of tricep pain. Also, House says that bicep pain indicates a mechanical issue while tricep pain indicates a (lack of) strength issue.

This issue is not so clear to me. Especially when I watch the Arizona Diamondbacks’ closer Jose Valverde. This guy seems to pause at the cocked position and then very consciously and forcefully chucks the ball from that position. And his fastball is frequently around 94-95 mph with what looks like very little whipping action. In fact, he also appears to me to move fairly slow and to open up early a lot. Go figure. (I haven’t analyzed video of him, though.)


#6

[quote=“RawTalent”]they launch heavy metal balls about 60 feet which is about the mound to homeplate. They need extreme strength and skill to do this.

Good we do the same workout routines as a shot putter.
or is it the same thing?[/quote]

While the shot put and pitch are very different motions there are similarities that are actually rather important. It really doesn’t have to do a whole lot with the arm muscles though.

Two important similarities:

Use of total body and timing create power
Maximum rate of force production (creating as much power in as little time)


#7

On a related note, Mike Marshall describes his motion as being similar to throwing a javelin and actually emphasizes use of the triceps muscle.


#8

You’d hard pressed to even throw a ball without using the tricep muscle as it is nearly impossible bio-mechanically. The tricep muscle pushes the the elbow away from the body e.g., throwing motion. You can’t pitch without it.


#9

OK. Write this one down. I admit I was wrong on that one. Somewhat. I spoke to soon. :oops: Jobe’s studies showed that the triceps activity was very early on in acceleration. Specifically, his EMG studies’ report in 1984 said:

Other muscle physiology studies I’ve read (Journal of Applied Physiology) state that muscle activity in a Stretch Shortening Cycle activity, like pitching, is only effective for the first 300 milliseconds and then it’s effectiveness drops off as speed of movement has increased. Jobe’s statements are pointing to “decelerating” and subsequent “initiation” of acceleration.

Papibon
Although the triceps do play a role, I’d say that other forces that have already been applied (transfer of energy up the chain) via rotational aspects, also play a role in the extension of the forearm and that it’s not ONLY from tricep contraction. Centrifugal force plays a large role here.


#10

[quote=“dm59”]Jobe’s studies showed that the triceps activity was very early on in acceleration. Specifically, his EMG studies’ report in 1984 said:

Jobe’s statements are pointing to “decelerating” and subsequent “initiation” of acceleration.[/quote]
DM,

Good info.

Am I right that this says, in simpler terms, that the triceps help stop elbow flexion and initiate elbow extension? If that’s correct, I don’t really see the connection to the terminating of external rotation. Do you?


#11

Good question Roger. Here’s my amateur kinesiologist’s reading of Jobe’s studies (and only the abstracts of those). Let’s look at a synopsis of what Jobe’s 2 studies said:

1983
EMG electrodes were inserted in the deltoid and rotator cuff muscles

Conclusion: Rotator cuff plays little role, if any, in acceleration.

1984
EMG electrodes were inserted in the biceps, long and lateral heads of the triceps, pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi, serratus anterior, and brachialis

[i]Conclusion: The termination of external rotation would be with reference to the action of the pecs, lats and serratus anterior. The triceps would only do this with respect to stopping further elbow flexion and then initiating elbow extension.[/i]


#12

If anyone is as much of a geek about this stuff as I am, here’s an excellent site that shows what each of those muscles actually does.


#13

Thanks, DM. That clarifies it for me.