Short mounds

how do pitchers pitch on short mounds when ther stride foot lands halfway on and off the mound we are new to travel ball allways pitched on dirt mound are long mound at pitching lessons

thanks

There’s not much you can do about those short mounds. Unless you have a pretty short stride to begin with, overstriding to get past the end of the mound is not a good answer. I would say to shorten the stride to stay on or just get used to it as best you can. I find it easier to adjust mechanics while shortening the stride over lengthening it. Especially if this is just for a game or two.

I hate portable mounds with a passion. I used to have a kid with a long stride and even though the mounds we played on were reasonably long, they weren’t long enough for him. He’d end up shortening his stride which would throw off his timing. On days when he was scheduled to pitch, the first thing I would do when we arrived at the park was to step off the length of the mound. That would tell me before the game even started if the kid would do ok or if he was going to struggle. Did I say how much I hate portable mounds? :pullinghair:

Short Mounds and Short Strides

When a pitcher short-strides during his/her pitching cycle/delivery, this is usually the signs of fatigue, sprains, momentary discomfort, and other physical ailments. Add lack of concentration, mental distractions, and so forth compound the short-stride.

Take away the lack of proper training, which is a topic all by itself, and we have the body’s management of a host of impressions that an athlete is trying to deal with other than the topography of the pitching surface. So, a pitcher is dealing with conditions that he/she has internally, thus passing on to other parts of the body extra loads of stress.

The lengthy two paragraphs above were designed to approach this topic from a different angle – namely the physical discomfort of pitching off a short-stride mound, by a not so healthy pitcher. Thus, instead of the mound itself causing problems, the not so healthy pitcher has brought ailments to the mound.

When a healthy pitcher encounters a short mound, more often than not, this design can cause ailments – sore lumbar, stiff neck, sore shoulders, leg cramps and a host of other things.

These prefab mounds are primarily designed for one purpose and one purpose only – to save money with field maintenance and other related issues. In effect, these mounds will inevitably cause an overly upright posture, total dependency on the arm to deliver the baseball, and a pitching surface that’s a journey in … surprise, surprise, surprise during every pitch.

Monitor your son for early signs of pain and discomfort in the lumbar (lower back), neck, shoulders and arm, groin, and leg cramps.

I know travel teams are an expensive proposition, but I suggest shutting him down at the first signs of what I mentioned heretofore. Don’t let someone else’s decision to save a buck influence your son’s health.

Coach B

[quote=“Coach Baker”]Short Mounds and Short Strides

When a healthy pitcher encounters a short mound, more often than not, this design can cause ailments – sore lumbar, stiff neck, sore shoulders, leg cramps and a host of other things.

These prefab mounds are primarily designed for one purpose and one purpose only – to save money with field maintenance and other related issues. In effect, these mounds will inevitably cause an overly upright posture, total dependency on the arm to deliver the baseball, and a pitching surface that’s a journey in … surprise, surprise, surprise during every pitch.

Monitor your son for early signs of pain and discomfort in the lumbar (lower back), neck, shoulders and arm, groin, and leg cramps.

I know travel teams are an expensive proposition, but I suggest shutting him down at the first signs of what I mentioned heretofore. Don’t let someone else’s decision to save a buck influence your son’s health.

Coach B[/quote]
I failed to mention the health-related issues of short mounds but Coach B nailed it and I agree 100% with him.

It was always a dilemma for me as the coach of the kid I referred to above as to whether or not to let him pitch on a short mound knowing that he would be shortening his stride, altering his timing, and exposing himself to greater risk of injury.