Setting batters up?

Ok, i’m 15 almost 16 and last year was my first year playing (JV) since 5th grade (HUGE mistake). Anyways, i’ll be trying out for JV again since last year was my first year pitching to real hitters in a while. So all i wanted to know was if anyone could help me with setting up batters. Like i said, i’ll be on JV hopefully unless my coaches call me up to varsity.

So here is my arsenal…
1.4 and 2 seam fastball
2.nasty curve (not joking, i’ve broken off some sharp 2.5-3 footers, my best pitch.
3.Change or splitty, i don’t know which, i’m going to try to work on one during tryouts.

P.S.The only two pitches i’ll be throwing are my 4 and 2 seamer, and my uncle charlie untll i get a third pitch later in the year 8) I’ll want help mostly w/my fastball (low-mid seventies) and curve combo…all help will be appreciated.

my favorite combination for the first set of batters is as follows:

Lead-Off: 4 seam, 2 seam (sinker), curveball (i used this combo last year in every game, and in every game i struck out the first batter)

2nd: curveball, curveball, fastball (good way to throw off a batter)

3rd: mix up your change up and 2 seamer. typically w/ good schools the 3rd guy is not fooled by any breaking pitch or blown away by a fastball. work this hitter.

if you have a low to mid 70s fastball and a great curveball, a smart hitter will get on top of the plate and sit on your curveball because he doesn’t have to honor the fastball at that speed unless it has good late movement.

can you throw strikes? how many hitters do you normally walk in a 5 to 7 inning outing. let’s start from there.

never keep the same pattern of pitches during the game, switch them up or hitters will know what to expect.

also dont go into an inning already planning on what to throw. you need to read the hitters and how they react to your pitches to know what to throw.

Personally I don’t see why people keep asking this question. there is no fool proof way to set up a batter. Every pitcher should go in with a plan as to how he wants to pitch to a certain batter and you just have to make changes as you go. It’s more of a feeling thing. The more you pitch to batters the more you will naturally understand and grasp the concept of “setting up”. Although to be honest with you… at the JV level there really wont be many batters with setting up… Dont make things more complex then they have to be. Hit your spots and trust your catcher.

[quote=“dusty delso”]if you have a low to mid 70s fastball and a great curveball, a smart hitter will get on top of the plate and sit on your curveball because he doesn’t have to honor the fastball at that speed unless it has good late movement.

can you throw strikes? how many hitters do you normally walk in a 5 to 7 inning outing. let’s start from there.[/quote]

not very many…last year was my first year pitching and i’d say i walk 1-4 batters in 7 innings.1 on a good day 4 on a bad day

I walked 12 in one inning last year.
lol (TOTALLY sore arm)

actually…i had a summer league last year, i was in left field and all of a sudden the coach comes out and yells out “HEY MUTCH, COME IN AND PITCH”

i dont mind him calling me in to pitch, i just like a little heads up first, i think i threw a total of 2 strikes to 7 different batters. (i also came in with the bases loaded)

i told the coach that i like a little heads up before i pitch (at least a chance to warm up good and get my mindset). The next week, he gave me a full day notice ahead of time and i got all of our outs, except one dribbler to 2nd, on strike outs.

this is straight from the notes vern ruhle handed to his pitching staff when he was at houston. we live by this plan.

throw the first pitch low to the middle of the plate. if it runs a little either way it’s still a strike. many times they are taking anyway. do not be too fine. 70% of low strikes put into play are outs. we love 1 pitch outs.

if the first one is a strike use a swing to guide your 2nd pitch, or if the ball ran in, go away. if it went away we really need to come inside. one of the first 3 will be inside if we get a strike. you must pitch inside. if you don’t throw hard, the inside pitch is a ball off the plate to protect your other pitches.

if the first pitch is a ball the second pitch is thrown to the same place. doesn’t have to be the same pitch, but anywhere low in the zone. we want one of the first three balls hit preferably on the ground or popped up.

2 of the first 3 pitches are strikes. if you can’t do this consistently you will not last long. a 5 to 12 pitch inning is ideal. let the other guy work. get back in the dugout as quick as you can.