Seams for a curball

Do you want to throw it so all 4 seams hit the wind or 2 seams. I was under the impression 2 seams are better. Or the smoother the better.

Curve balls should have four seam top spin to ensure that you’re getting the proper 12-6 movement

I would think 12-6 has to do with arm slot and not seam. you could throw a 3-9 curve ball and still use 4 seams, depends on how u throw the ball.

What kind of movement are you looking to get from the pitch?

I want to know if a curve ball thrown 4 seam or a 2 seam, which one will get the most movement.

Ok I found this
[i]"THE ROLE OF SEAMS

The 108 stitches on a baseball grab the air around the ball and create a larger boundary layer than a ball with no seams would create. The horseshoe shape all around the baseball allows a pitcher to throw just about any pitch as a two-seam pitch, a four-seam pitch, or something that isn’t quite either of those (a three seamer?). Most sliders fall into the third category.

A four-seam pitch spins on an axis that allows four seams to influence the boundary layer. The four seams are evenly spaced (balanced) around the baseball. This symmetry creates a stable and relatively predictable Magnus effect.

A two-seam pitch, though, spins on an axis that unbalances the seams even though all four seams still influence the boundary layer. This axis puts a seam loop on either side of the ball, leaving the two connecting seams close together on one side of the ball.

With the axis turned slightly to the left or the right, one of the seam loops moves toward the point of pressure (where the ball breaks through the surrounding air and experiences the greatest wind resistance), and the other seam loop moves away from it. This axis exaggerates the Magnus effect of the seam that moves toward the point of pressure, and reduces the Magnus effect of the seam that moves away.

The dominant seam, because of its almost circular shape, creates a point of nearly constant friction as it pushes boundary layer air almost directly into the air breaking across the point of pressure. When the seam catches that angle just right, the baseball will dart left or right depending on which seam is dominant."[/i]

But dont really understand it. So 2 or 4 seams makes more break?
got it here = http://www.texasleaguers.com/articles/the-magnus-effect-why-pitches-move.html

It’s individual.

It’s all how YOU can get the most amount of break possible.

That’s why there’s so many different grips because EVERYONE is DIFFERENT.

If there was one way to get more break then another way then everyone would be throwing a curve the same way.

It boils down to playing around with different grips and seeing what works best for you.

You can look at theories and go by theory, but once you start applying things in theory it doesn’t necessarily transfer over correctly.

To add onto what wales said, it’s less about what 2 vs. 4 seams will do, but more about how you impart spin on the ball. If one grip allows you to impart more break then use it, regardless of how you hold it.

A lot of pros throw two-seam curve balls. It’s not uncommon, though traditionally you would use a four-seam grip. Sometimes you just can’t get the feel of a certain pitch, though. For example: I throw almost exclusively two-seam fastballs inside, because I am not confident in commanding a four-seam fastball to the inside part of the plate. (Steven Ellis said the same thing, I think.)

[quote=“Wales Diesel”]It’s individual.

It’s all how YOU can get the most amount of break possible.

That’s why there’s so many different grips because EVERYONE is DIFFERENT.

If there was one way to get more break then another way then everyone would be throwing a curve the same way.

It boils down to playing around with different grips and seeing what works best for you.

You can look at theories and go by theory, but once you start applying things in theory it doesn’t necessarily transfer over correctly.[/quot

Absolutely right! Well said

Certainly there are other parameters that affect the pitch. But, all other things being equal, the more seams there are pushing into the wind, the more air resistance is created on the side of the ball spinning into the wind resulting in more movement towards the opposite side of the ball.

The force responsible for movement or lack thereof in any pitch is called the Magnus Force. This is the same force that gives airplanes lift.

The Magnus force works as such:

When an object is moving through the air, air flows around the object. If air moves faster over one surface of the object than the other, the object tends to go in that direction.

A curveball curves because the seams rotating forward makes the air flow over the top of the ball slower, and the air flow under the ball faster. This gives it the downward movement.
Conversely, with a four seam fastball, the air over the top is moving faster because it has backspin. This gives it a little bit of lift, which in some cases gives it the appearance of rising.

You see, its all a matter of physics. Everything is. So take these facts, and determine for yourself how many seams you want to go against the flow of air.